It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I agree with the Inuit people , The sun is definetly moving over a different path in the sky . See M

page: 23
57
<< 20  21  22    24 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Orion75
 

I see.
But you did talk about Sirius being visible on August 1.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


He was just using it as an example as the annual movement of the stars. He didn't actually mean he saw sirius; just that it would be in the same relative position at the same time of year




posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:41 AM
link   
reply to post by Solasis
 

I see.
But if you can't see it, how would you know it's in the wrong place? I just get the impression he isn't as familiar with the night sky as he thinks. Similar to the way people aren't as familiar with the position of the Sun as they may think.

From where I stand, the Sun and the stars are where they belong.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Solasis
 

I see.
But if you can't see it, how would you know it's in the wrong place?
edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I observed this when it was visible, not when it wasn't.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:45 AM
link   

Originally posted by Orion75

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Solasis
 

I see.
But if you can't see it, how would you know it's in the wrong place?
edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I observed this when it was visible, not when it wasn't.


You said Sirius. You said August 1st.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:49 AM
link   
reply to post by Orion75
 




It was just an example. You *can* see Sirus in the summer since it is so bright but only very early I believe.

No. It rises after the Sun.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Solasis
 

I see.
But if you can't see it, how would you know it's in the wrong place? I just get the impression he isn't as familiar with the night sky as he thinks. Similar to the way people aren't as familiar with the position of the Sun as they may think.

From where I stand, the Sun and the stars are where they belong.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Phage, I never thought I'd see you being dense like this... He said 'Like, say, Sirius." And he used the current date in the same way, just as an example. You're arguing with an entirely irrelevant part of the post, and for little reason.

Sirius would indeed be in the same place on the same day in different years; he hasn't observed a discrepancy in sirius. I'm with you in doubting that he actually observed a discrepancy in Orion (though I'm also allowing that it could be distantly possible, through some unlikely and unknown circumstance), but he didn't make any such claim about sirius.
edit on 1-8-2011 by Solasis because: (no reason given)



Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Orion75
 




It was just an example. You *can* see Sirus in the summer since it is so bright but only very early I believe.

No. It rises after the Sun.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Though I believe you're completely right here, hehe.
edit on 1-8-2011 by Solasis because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 11:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by Orion75

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Solasis
 

I see.
But if you can't see it, how would you know it's in the wrong place?
edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I observed this when it was visible, not when it wasn't.


You said Sirius. You said August 1st.


Yes I did. And have also explained to you the mention of Sirus was an example.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 12:03 PM
link   
reply to post by Orion75
 

I see.
Maybe a better example would have been Capella since it is visible.
But, as I said, from where I stand it's in the right place.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 12:21 PM
link   
Okay, So here I am in N. America, it's the middle of the day, and I can see the Southern cross from inside my house! Obviously somethink funny is going on and anyone who denies it is a sheeple



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 12:36 PM
link   
Today we finally had nice weather so we ate dinner in the garden.
The table and chairs where placed on the same spot and position as they where last year.

I remember one day last year when we had spaghetti in our garden, my mother and sister came for dinner. I remember sitting in my usual chair, me and the persons sitting next to me having the sun in our faces. I remember this very clearly because at one point I moved my chair to the right so the tree would block the sun from my face and everyone started making jokes about it.
I remember that every time we had dinner in the guarden, between 6 and 7 pm, the sun was behind that single tree and every time I looked for the perfect alignment of sun-tree-me, to get the sun out of my face.

But today, at 6.30pm, the sun wasn't even near the tree!
It was almost two hours to the left of it!

I hadn't payed much attention to these topics on ATS, but today I noticed it myself.
My husband simply said 'that isn't possible', although he also admitted remembering the sun jokes from last year. He saw the difference in the possition of the sun, but still keeps saying "not possible".

Right now I'm like "wth???"
need to catch up on my reading now... just wanted to share this.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 12:38 PM
link   
reply to post by GypsK
 


are you comparing the same day this year as last year? Or even the same week/month?



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 12:46 PM
link   
reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


I'm comparing the same month.
Last years dinner party was in August, but I don't remember the exact date though.

I think I'll go to the park one of these days to check the 'solar clock' that has been standing there for years (not sure if you call it a solar clock in english as well.... I mean one of those stone tablets that give the hour by the shade of the pin). Anyway, If that one is still giving the right time, then I must be losing my mind

but if it isn't.... well, what then ?
edit on 1/8/2011 by GypsK because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 01:05 PM
link   
reply to post by coffeesniffer
 


That's a good suggestion coffeesniffer!
The one thing I'm not going to do, though, is move my bed back to where it was to see if the moon shines in my face a 3:00 AM...lol

This is an interesting thread. I would like to see some actual data on the subject. In the mean-time maybe we can start gathering data on our own.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 01:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by GypsK
reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


I'm comparing the same month.
Last years dinner party was in August, but I don't remember the exact date though.


Well, I'm guessing perhaps your dinner party was much later in august last year. The sun can move a significant distance from mid-late july to late august. Is there a friend you can check with or some other way to pin down an exact date?


(not sure if you call it a solar clock in english as well....


Sun Dials we say. Please come back here with your findings either way.
edit on 1-8-2011 by incrediblelousminds because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 05:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by kdog1982
I used my compass for magnetic north,
then used this declination calculator
www.ngdc.noaa.gov...
to determine true north,
took some measurements and used this calculator
www.csgnetwork.com...
with info on where the sun is with this
www.sunearthtools.com...

and,no,that is not my location,just using it for a reference


I was just wondering if anyone used my links and methods to determine
if the sun is where it should be.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 10:24 PM
link   
reply to post by kdog1982
 



I wish someone would respond with a resounding yes to my question and put this to rest once and for all. Does anybody own or have access to a real navigation grade sextant? If so please shoot the sun, moon, and stars and check this along with a magnetic compass reading for a known surveyed spot. Something like a lighthouse that would have been surveyed hundred plus years ago would be ideal. Check this against the historical data and then check this against a GPS.

I would go do this myself but a “real” sextant is around $3,000. I can find cheaper ones around three or four hundred, but these specifically say they are not accurate and should not be used for navigation purposes. So I am afraid any reading from them would be worthless.



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 10:27 PM
link   
reply to post by byeluvolk
 

No need for a sextant. The house I have been living in for 15 years has picture windows looking north across a bay. On the other side of the bay is a point. That point is due true north of my house. Every night for fifteen years (when I've been home and when it hasn't been cloudy) Polaris is above that point.

edit on 8/1/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2011 @ 10:43 PM
link   
I am in Canada and I know the sun is rising further to the North than normal. The Sun rises before 6 AM here so I wake up to the sun rising in My bedroom. It was very noticable in June, less noticable now.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 04:41 AM
link   
I have noticed, and been asking everyone around me if they have too... nobody has.. or seems to care.

I'v also noticed that the leaves have started turning red and orange, and started falling to the ground...
It's only the beg of Aug, Summer just started, but it seems like it's late Sept and Autumn is upon us already...

....very strange.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 05:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by jondave
I am in Canada and I know the sun is rising further to the North than normal. The Sun rises before 6 AM here so I wake up to the sun rising in My bedroom. It was very noticable in June, less noticable now.


Yes, the sun does rise further and further north each day in the summer until June 20-23, which is called the "summer solstice," when the sun rises at its northernmost point and appears to stand still. After the 3rd week in June, it begins rising further and further south each morning, by an average of about 1 degree further every day---it's where the Babylonians came up with 360 degrees in a circle, from 360 regular days in a calendar year.

The phenomenon is caused by the fact that the earth's equator is at a 23.3 degree angle with the plane of its revolution around the sun. It's what causes the seasons.

Stonehenge, Thebes, Chitzen Itza, and even the cathedral at Chartres enshrine these celestial rhythms in their architectures.


It's amazing to me, that we live in a time when most people online are so divorced from nature that they've never noticed the seasonal changes in the sun's course around the ecliptic. And at the same time that they depend on the internet, they are ignorant of the science behind such basic phenomena as the seasons. No wonder so many people here think that stonehenge must have been built by aliens!!



new topics

top topics



 
57
<< 20  21  22    24 >>

log in

join