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Giant Optical Magnifying Glasses in space found

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posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 




The cell wall contains the contents of the cell... the heliosphere serves no such function.


The heliosphere contains the electrically charged solar winds from the interstellar medium.



And what sort of waste does the solar system dispose of?


Light, gravity, maybe other stuff as well that can breach the heliosphere.



You seem to have an inaccurate image of the universe and its mass distribution. You're treating it like a gas, which works to keep equilibrium by dissipating dense areas and filling thin areas. The universe doesn't work that way. To say that deleting the solar system would cause surrounding matter to flow in to fill the void means we should also expect the contents of a living room to shift to fill the void left by taking the TV out.


The interstellar medium contains a lot of gas. If this living room was under water then liquid would also act the same way. If our living room was underground then you would have to carve out a very large room before enough potential is reached for it to cave in on you, being in seismic unstable place and weak rock helps with reaching the potential quicker.



Now, what, exactly, do you mean by gravity and the direct relationship with mass?


The strength of the gravity that is on the surface of a planet is in direct relation to the mass of the planet.




posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by kwakakev
reply to post by CLPrime
 


The heliosphere contains the electrically charged solar winds from the interstellar medium.


Maybe we have varying definitions of "contains". If by "contains" you mean that other objects exist within, then yes, the heliosphere contains the solar system. But the heliosphere in no way keeps the solar system contained the way the cell wall keeps the cell contents contained (as in, preventing the contents from escaping).



Light, gravity, maybe other stuff as well that can breach the heliosphere.


Okay...but what does this "waste" have to do with anything?



The interstellar medium contains a lot of gas. If this living room was under water then liquid would also act the same way. If our living room was underground then you would have to carve out a very large room before enough potential is reached for it to cave in on you, being in seismic unstable place and weak rock helps with reaching the potential quicker.


The interstellar medium is, on average, 10^20 times less dense than water. So, "a lot" might be the overstatement of the millennium. And the driving force of galaxy interactions is gravity, not gas distribution... as I've tried to explain.



The strength of the gravity that is on the surface of a planet is in direct relation to the mass of the planet.


Of course. It's also in direct relation to the radius of the planet. But what about it?



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 






Light, gravity, maybe other stuff as well that can breach the heliosphere

Okay...but what does this "waste" have to do with anything?


It is about the topic of this thread, gravitational lensing. Perhaps we should pick this up after a decent sleep


On a side note, if you see the nearby galaxy spreading out if the solar system was removed then I see the solar system imploding if the universe was removed. The books on gravity have changed a bit over the years and it is a tough on with lots of theories around.



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by kwakakev
reply to post by CLPrime
 


Perhaps we should pick this up after a decent sleep


You can tell?



On a side note, if you see the nearby galaxy spreading out if the solar system was removed then I see the solar system imploding if the universe was removed. The books on gravity have changed a bit over the years and it is a tough on with lots of theories around.


The "books" on gravity have merely been amended over the years, and only one theory truly holds up - General Relativity. GR is our gravitational foundation, and, even after numerous tests of the highest required precision, it has yet to fail us.

When the solar system is in the midst of other stars, it exerts an inward gravitational pull on those stars that are nearby. If the solar system were removed, then that inward pull would disappear, and the external mass would dominate...thus leading to less of an inward movement, and, potentially, causing an outward movement. This is an extreme generality, though, as such a situation demands more details than we can model in our heads. But that would be the overall effect if the solar system were to disappear.
edit on 18-8-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


i am going to compile a list of observable conditions which should be found if gravitational lensing foci is present
1. a hot focus point along the axis of rotation of the parent galaxy
2.the foci would not gravitationally interact with source galaxy
3. signature in the sub mm and infrared wavelengths
4. radio emitions from the superheating of gases
5. ultra high redshift of foci
6. the helio lenses act to concentrate light within the galaxy and focus the light exterior to the galaxy
7. the "appence" of the galaxy would be "bright" AGN and a source of light must be present
8. the smaller helio bubbles should show gravitational microscoping increasing the size and brightness of the stars within them
9. galaxies with the center reigion "missing" are suspect of gravitational microscoping at the galaxy scale
10. jets from galaxies may follow the "light" along the axis of rotation
11. the foci may "draw" gasses to be consumed and the signature of the gasaes being consumed may show "what" the gases are

12.stars sizes and brightness can be increased by gravitational microscoping


Interestingly enough, though, the majority of class M stars are red dwarfs. So, this immediately puts a single question in my mind: could Mirach be a red dwarf gravitationally microscoped to look like a red giant?


from CLPrime

13. there should be two distinct effects 1 gravitationally induced foci and a seperate caustic
14. difuse emitions of reflected non focused light could give the "milky" apperence to galaxies
15. temperatures in the high KeV reigion found without gravitational interaction with host galaxy would provide a sample to study

please feel free to add anything i have missed to the list

xploder



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:08 AM
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number 15 requires attension lol
been a long day
xploder



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


I think you've done a beautiful job of summing up the points of observation. In fact, you've got about 15 more points there than I would've thought of.

I'm just glad I was able to contribute even a little bit.
Actually, I'm quite happy simply when I don't screw something up.

Regardless, I hope to be able to continue to contribute. Even if it is just 2 cents worth.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


i would like to give you direct credit for the helio foci as this scale size foci was not anticipated by me,
i had previously looked at clusters and galaxies, but after reading the sun sized foci i realized that the helio lense would also create a focus point, directly behind it from the source of light exterior to the lens.

after looking at the diagram from the (GM) thread of mine i realized i had over looked an optical signature on the heliospherical scale.

your contributions have helped me realize there could be potential focal points exterior to the helio bubbles,

the other point is the obervational questions you asked about stars within our parallex,
and the ability of one star to "optically" mimic a different class and size of star

the cluster lensing foci and galaxy lensing foci had occoured to me but the helio scale observation is very largly due to you and unexpected by me




i was so busy looking at the larger scale interactions,
i missed the smaller scale of helio foci

i would like to ask the staff here if we could run a colaberation with members to complie images and information on suspect optical interpretations.

an ATS member survey of heliospheres, galaxies and clusters with suspect images "optical" to be inspected against the criteria (to be refined) and an "optically" picked survey sample could be studied in more depth.

or we could pick samples where the Kev readings are strangly high along the axis of rotation.

and work backwards to optical images

xploder



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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Originally posted by XPLodER

Originally posted by Gemini67
cool find

but im left confused and dumbfounded


if the galaxies are capable of magnifying images,
they are also able to collect and focus light,
if you have ever played with a hand held magnifying glass in the sun,
you will now the power of the focused sun,

now imagine the galaxy as a giant hand held magnifyer,
if enough light goes through the lens there should be a focal point for the light and
it would be "hot"

xploder


I'm certainly not smart enough to hang with you on this but the way you explained it is superb and easy to grasp.

However, if so, wouldn't this be a great way to get off this planet? This must be how UFO's get around.





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