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Street View cars grabbed locations of phones, PCs

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posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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Street View cars grabbed locations of phones, PCs


news.cnet.com

Google's Street View cars collected the locations of millions of laptops, cell phones, and other Wi-Fi devices around the world, a practice that raises novel privacy concerns, CNET has confirmed.

The cars were supposed to collect the locations of Wi-Fi access points. But Google also recorded the street addresses and unique identifiers of computers and other devices using those wireless networks and then made the data publicly available through Google.com until a few weeks ago.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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It's no news that Google is a major source of concern for those of us interested in Privacy and Freedom (yes they deserve capital letters!!!)

The role of information has never been more unclear in society. It is becoming one of the most central issues of the day. In recent weeks, with Anonymous and similar phenomena in the news, the issue takes on new urgency, whatever side of the debate you weigh in on.

Who's watching you? Who's watching them?

Stay safe, ATS.

news.cnet.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


You must have read my mind today Silent,
I had even donned a new avatar.

S&F from me.

And the article makes mention that as if its not bad enough Google collected
this info, they also had made it publically available until a few weeks ago.



The cars were supposed to collect the locations of Wi-Fi access points. But Google also recorded the street addresses and unique identifiers of computers and other devices using those wireless networks and then made the data publicly available through Google.com until a few weeks ago.
Read more: news.cnet.com...

edit on 26-7-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Haha fantastic!


The article says that a programming accident is probably the "most likely" cause for the whole thing but of course I don't trust google farther than I could throw it. Even if they were up to something sinster it does seem strange to make the info publically avalable, no?



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 



Haha a programming error Laugh ...cough ...sputter. Grrrrrrr......

Thats hysterical...

Oh yeah its no big deal thats why they are getting fined for it.

Thing is, what if no one had taken notice or did not care to report it.
Well on one did in the U.S. ???

Are we that apathetic as a society?

I am going to answer my own question, yes...look at Facebook. Unreal!



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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It was on our news last night. Google said they had no plans to offer an opt-out for it either. So why would you map access points in peoples homes to begin with? Are they empowered by DHS? Are they in bed with TPTB?



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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i read something someone said about the new google social network that fits with this.

"i love how google plays coy and asks me to fill in my information."



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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I ve learned, since having a computer for online, since 1999, anything wireless sucks, mostly because they break alto quicker and you have to buy the wireless unit at a higher cost, than something that still uses cables* and connections. back in the mid 90's, scam artists would steal credit card numbers, things like that, from people using cell phones...wireless* technology jsut makes it easier for people to scam and steal. i still have a phone at home, that plugs in, with the wire from its body to handle, and it has never ever failed, nor does it suck up tons of electricity, run on a battery, and the reception on both ends is flawless..compared too todays cheap plastic phones.



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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The mapping of wifi networks has something to do with location sharing software like latitude from google i think.
Tie that in with their new social "network" setup google+ and you could have a real use scenario for this collected data.



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 07:11 PM
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Don't worry people, we can trust Google. ATS has been working with them lately so we have no reason for concern.



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 




Interesting... it makes you wonder what else, like the google street cars. have gone around collecting "data" and for what reasons?


Strange times we live in.
edit on 26/7/11 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Man, google was running around snooping on
all kinds of people
this should be illegal...oh wait it is.
here is a thread i started a while back about google getting
the attention of the F.C.C
Above Top Secret thread

WASHINGTON — The Federal Communications Commission said Wednesday that it was investigating whether Google had violated laws when it collected Wi-Fi data as part of its Street View photo project.

Last month, Google disclosed that its Street View cars collected passwords, e-mails and other personal information wirelessly from unsuspecting people across the country,” Michele Ellison, chief of the F.C.C’s enforcement bureau, said Wednesday in a statement.
.

SnF

edit on 26-7-2011 by paradiselost333 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


how is this new? I recall hearing about this years ago.

Also, wasn't it just 'packets' of data, in incomprehensible pieces, as it filtered out of people s unsecured wireless networks?

If so, I seriously doubt there was much decipherable. Why would anyone not have a password on their wireless?
edit on 26-7-2011 by incrediblelousminds because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


because people are idiots. they buy the thing at best buy or walmart, get it home and spend an hour trying to figure out how to make it work. once they get it working they don't change anything because they are afraid it will quit working again. my previous CEO was like that. his wireless at home was wide open. he wouldn't put a password on it because he was afraid his kids wouldn't be able to game online fast enough with it.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 07:22 AM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


Yea, because your 32 bit WEP key is gonna stop anyone.

Anybody with even the the smallest amount of computer knowledge can crack a WEP key in under a minute. It's not even that difficult. And if you think Google doesn't have a program crunching through the packets as it passes every neighborhood then you a living in ignorance.

Let me introduce you to backtrack

www.backtrack-linux.org...

This linux distro is free to anyone and comes with instructions and the programs needed to crack WiFi passwords. Even the latest WPA2 protection can still be cracked given enough time. But unless thats what you set up yourself, most likely you are still running the out of box standard 32 bit WEP which has proven to be completely useless.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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What's wrong with Google? Am I missing something?



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by Dr. Strange
And if you think Google doesn't have a program crunching through the packets as it passes every neighborhood then you a living in ignorance.


I have yet to see even a shred of evidence implying this occurred.

Have you? If so, can you point me towards it? Thanks!



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


i dont own any Wi-Fi, my Desktop isnt a Wi-Fi so


So google isnt part of the big brother eh? what about now.
edit on 27-7-2011 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 





The cars were supposed to collect the locations of Wi-Fi access points. But Google also recorded the street addresses and unique identifiers of computers and other devices using those wireless networks and then made the data publicly available through Google.com until a few weeks ago.


That's from the C-Net article. The program used to "collect" addresses is the same packet sniffing program used to break the keys. I am not saying that is what Google is doing, I was simply replying to your absurd statement that having some kind of wep protection is going to keep hackers or ,anyone for that matter, out.



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by Dr. Strange
reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 





The cars were supposed to collect the locations of Wi-Fi access points. But Google also recorded the street addresses and unique identifiers of computers and other devices using those wireless networks and then made the data publicly available through Google.com until a few weeks ago.


That's from the C-Net article. The program used to "collect" addresses is the same packet sniffing program used to break the keys. I am not saying that is what Google is doing, I was simply replying to your absurd statement that having some kind of wep protection is going to keep hackers or ,anyone for that matter, out.


Interresting Thanks for that.

I think you may have misinterpreted my statement, though. I don't think I said anything about expecting web protection would "keep hackers out". I merely seemed surprised that people dont have any kind of password. I see it all the time.




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