Found a book called Morals & Dogma

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posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by pianopraze
It actually makes me interested in being a Mason to gain access to further readings on the topics.


You do not need to be a Mason to enjoy reading other esoteric works on the Fraternity. An open solicitation of suggestions would yield you years worth of reading.



edit on 22-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.


I have a back log of years worth of reading. My problem is lack of framework for understanding.

Studying this material is akin to reading strait through a bible... you have to know a lot of back material before you can understand what you are reading.

I know some but when it comes to this material most writings seem deliberately obscure. I was surprised how direct and open pike was with much of this material. He confirmed much of what I was suspecting from other readings. Bust still yet I'm not sure I understood a lot of what is presented. Everything is in layers of understanding, and the book still is missing a lot of context because it is referencing things not written obviously as it is a commentary on each degree.




posted on Jul, 26 2011 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by pianopraze
 


Pike wrote for a 19th century audience, and thus expected his readers to have a background in philosophy, comparative religion, etc. The wall you're running into is the same one encountered by many modern Masons who read the book.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 12:15 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
reply to post by pianopraze
 


Pike wrote for a 19th century audience, and thus expected his readers to have a background in philosophy, comparative religion, etc. The wall you're running into is the same one encountered by many modern Masons who read the book.


Yes!, which is a great reason to give yourself a background in philosophy and world religions....!!!
Modern Masons should remember their Fellowcraft and always take time to learn.

I would also add to what Masonic Light said, that while brother Pike is one of our best minds and Morals and Dogma one of my most favorites books ever......he speaks for Albert Pike, and not all of Masonry. Many people seem to think if Pike believes something all Masons do. Pike doesn't define masonry, however every mason should read come of his works, I think.

Pike read such a VAST amount of literature, history, and religious works. Things he considers to be common knowledge might not be known to many PHD's and many then did not understand some of his points, also some of his information was well...wrong, as he had more limited information historically and about many religions due to the lack of scholarship on some topics in the 1800s.....so just read what he says with a tendency to fact check. They had less access to much that we have today then, however he had more time to read, then then most of us do today. That said I doubt I have met anyone today even on collegic level that have anywhere close to his width of knowledge. He's fascinating.



posted on Jul, 27 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
reply to post by pianopraze
 


Pike wrote for a 19th century audience, and thus expected his readers to have a background in philosophy, comparative religion, etc. The wall you're running into is the same one encountered by many modern Masons who read the book.


This is a very often-overlooked point. Modern people, Mason or otherwise, simply lack the specific background and context that many 19th century people had. Not to sound condescending, but I'd wager that the average "liberal arts" graduate would be hard-pressed to debate philosophical, historical, and religious issues. And I lump myself right in with them as well. Despite being more than 20 years out of college, I find that I now appreciate things like history, philosophy, etc. FAR more than I did when I was younger.

The simple notion of an organization that promotes virtue, truth, obedience to God and country seems so foreign to so many today.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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I have a very well-used copy of M&D that I have read (and parts of it I have re-read and re-read) It has tons of underlining and marginal notes that I have made and I often use it for references when writing Masonic articles. I personally think it's a wonderful book but too many non- and anti-Masons believe it's "Pikes Word" and the so-called "Bible" of Freemasonry. Nothing could be further from the truth. Pike notes in the preface that he's about 1/2 author and 1/2 compiler; additionally he states that "everyone is entirely free to reject anything in the book he finds to be unsound" (paraphrased; I'm too lazy today to get the book off the shelf and quote)

I keep extra copies around to give to sincerely interested people and have given away at least two dozen over the last 15 or 20 years.
Also, at the upcoming Supreme Council meeting in Washington DC the new "Annotated Morals And Dogma" will be released. It will be for sale at the Scottish Rite Store on their website scottishrite.org... sometime in September. ANYONE may purchase it.

The book is the complete original M&D with copious notes showing where Pike got his various quotes, etc. along with scriptural references that were left out and so forth. It's pretty clear that this isn't a secret book and I highly recommend it to anyone who's interested in Scottish Rite Masonry. (By the way, it's good to see all my old ATS friends again. It's been a while!)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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FORTHCOMING TITLE:

Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry: Annotated Edition (hardbound)
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Available for sale at the Supreme Council Session – AUGUST 22, 2011.
Available at scottishritestore.org – SEPTEMBER 1, 2011.
----------------------------------------​----------------------

By Arturo de Hoyos, 33°, G.C., Grand Archivist and Grand Historian; Contributions and Glossary by Rex R. Hutchens, , 33°, G.C., Past Grand Master; Foreword by Ronald A. Seale, 33°, Sovereign Grand Commander.

A Masonic classic! The fundamental source book of Scottish Rite philosophy--now available in a new, user-friendly, and scholarly edition!

First published from 1872 to 1969, "Morals and Dogma" is one of the most insightful works ever prepared for Freemasonry. It is a collection of thirty-two essays which provide a rationale for the Scottish Rite degrees. It encompasses a study of Freemasonry, wise philosophy, ancient mysteries, mythology, ritual, and religion. It serves the useful purpose of putting Masonic morality and ethics within the context of the general society, and bids man to think large--to cast aside the petty concerns of everyday life and to improve ourselves.

This new edition includes the complete original text, but has been fully updated and improved. Spelling errors have been corrected, and it is set in clear, easy-to-read type; it retains the original pagination within the body of the text, while new subject headings and paragraph numbers make finding passages easy!

Approximately 4,000 notes reveal the original sources used by Pike, clarify passages, suggest further reading, and include cross-references. New "ready references" reveal scriptural sources.

Profusely illustrated with many images from the original sources Pike had before him when he prepared the original edition.

New glossary, with primary and secondary bibliographies, and a new index.

A detailed introduction on the history of Morals and Dogma.

Hardbound (8" x 10") with decorative covers, printed in two colors; illustrated, indexed; 1116 pages.



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by senrak
Hardbound (8" x 10") with decorative covers, printed in two colors; illustrated, indexed; 1116 pages.
Any wagers on what percentage of that 1116 pages is on the 28th degree?
(For whatever reason, in the original M&D, Ch. 28 is more than a quarter of the book. Some degrees get a measly 3 or 4 pages by comparison.)



posted on Aug, 2 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by leemann123
 


I've read a large portion of it....If you ever want to know anything about the REAL Masons, it is required reading....I say read it, unless you just want to keep believing the malarky that anti-Masons put out.



posted on Aug, 12 2011 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by leemann123
 


I read Morals & Dogma. I do not recall anything of specific value other than maybe a forced altering of consciousness after one trudges through it all. I don't remember any real data of value. I have read other books that were much more illuminating. M&D could be a good start though for somebody new. It definitely requires effort and it will have you thinking in new ways.

Blavatsky is much more valuable. The real secret is tipped by Blavatsky. I believe that is why she is ridiculed. 99.99% of people reading Blavatsky have no idea.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by Theosophical
I read Morals & Dogma. I do not recall anything of specific value other than maybe a forced altering of consciousness after one trudges through it all. I don't remember any real data of value. I have read other books that were much more illuminating. M&D could be a good start though for somebody new. It definitely requires effort and it will have you thinking in new ways.

Blavatsky is much more valuable. The real secret is tipped by Blavatsky. I believe that is why she is ridiculed. 99.99% of people reading Blavatsky have no idea.


When I was a teenager I tried reading Morals and Dogma and also thought it contains no valuable information whatsoever. I also deemed Blavatsky more interesting. Now, a few decades later, I picked the book up again and am enthralled by it, while having no interest in Blavatsky.

So it might be an age thing.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating

Originally posted by Theosophical
I read Morals & Dogma. I do not recall anything of specific value other than maybe a forced altering of consciousness after one trudges through it all. I don't remember any real data of value. I have read other books that were much more illuminating. M&D could be a good start though for somebody new. It definitely requires effort and it will have you thinking in new ways.

Blavatsky is much more valuable. The real secret is tipped by Blavatsky. I believe that is why she is ridiculed. 99.99% of people reading Blavatsky have no idea.


When I was a teenager I tried reading Morals and Dogma and also thought it contains no valuable information whatsoever. I also deemed Blavatsky more interesting. Now, a few decades later, I picked the book up again and am enthralled by it, while having no interest in Blavatsky.

So it might be an age thing.


I'm 42 and the polar opposite it would appear.

And wondering what you found in Morals & Dogma while missing the keys in Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine. I never could have caught the 9-month cycle on my own without Blavatsky preparing me for it. The books literally primed me for the revelation. I've never talked to anybody that understood, or if they did they would not admit it. It is something I have studied for 14 years now and it is the most intense aspect of my life.

That and encoded public broadcast. The invisible inside the visible.



posted on Aug, 13 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by Theosophical
I'm 42 and the polar opposite it would appear.


Then you're older than me.





And wondering what you found in Morals & Dogma while missing the keys in Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine. I never could have caught the 9-month cycle on my own without Blavatsky preparing me for it. The books literally primed me for the revelation. I've never talked to anybody that understood, or if they did they would not admit it. It is something I have studied for 14 years now and it is the most intense aspect of my life.


If you're that much into Theosophy I dont really want to question that or make it bad. All I can say is I appreciate Morals and Dogma today and did not appreciate it when I was younger.

I understand various parts of the book differently than I did decades ago, due to a change in perspective. A gardener notices more about gardens than a layman. A butcher notices more about meat than a baker. Its the same with that book. The eyes through which you read, determine what you pick up.



posted on Aug, 17 2011 @ 10:19 PM
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Reading Pike requires a pretty good back ground in world religions, ancient dead religions, and mythology to understand where his head is at....helps to know abit about the 1800's as well.....so I think as your education, formal, or self taught expands...so does much of Pike......as well as his flaws. The Golden Bough was dry for me at that age....and i didn't see the big deal, now i find it much more interesting. Also I guess as I have gotten older source material tends to become more interesting then someone telling me what to see and think.

Blavatsky......eh no comment aside from, I think her and Phineas Taylor have more in common.



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 02:54 AM
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Originally posted by ForkandSpoon


Blavatsky......eh no comment aside from, I think her and Phineas Taylor have more in common.


Yep. That is the common opinion. Yet Blavatsky explains how the stock market works. She literally spells it out for the ones that can read it. She tells you how the stock market moves and on what time cycle it turns.



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 03:38 AM
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For those that do not have a copy of Moralsand Dogma and would like to read it, may I please refer you to this link:

www.gutenberg.org...

Happy reading.



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by TheLoneArcher
For those that do not have a copy of Moralsand Dogma and would like to read it, may I please refer you to this link:

www.gutenberg.org...

Happy reading.
My preferred online version, as it has page numbers that correspond to the old print editions.



posted on Aug, 18 2011 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by JoshNorton
 


After looking at your version, I bow to your better judgement and star you for it.

S&F



posted on Aug, 22 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by Theosophical
 


...and yet neither she nor most theosophist became filthy rich of the market. Some do become more wealthy off of benefactors, books, and scams.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 01:10 AM
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Originally posted by ForkandSpoon
reply to post by Theosophical
 


...and yet neither she nor most theosophist became filthy rich of the market. Some do become more wealthy off of benefactors, books, and scams.


In that sense then, she is a repository of knowledge. I suppose she wasn't interested in the money market, or she didn't see the connection between the two. Or maybe the world now is even more highly manipulated. Maybe she never knew how the information related to the actual power game. I see it move the money, on time, predictably, cyclically and cryptically.

Morals And Dogma seemed to me to be more of an introduction. It is useful, no doubt.

Other books give much more information, and apparently are not all that popular. Blavatsky's Isis and Secret and Erich Neumann's Consciousness should be read by everybody who has read Morals And Dogma. And stay tuned to the headline news religiously.






edit on 23-8-2011 by Theosophical because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

As an aside. for those interested, Pike's Morals and Dogma can be read in full here:

www.sacred-texts.com...
edit on 20-7-2011 by Masonic Light because: (no reason given)





Hmmmm....

Interesting...





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