Found a book called Morals & Dogma

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posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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So I was going through my garage last night and I found a book called Morals & Dogma. My grandfather was a mason, the scottish rite or whatever (Masonry isn't my strongest subject) It said it was written by Albert Pike and that this copy was published in 1953. I've started to flip through it, it's pretty interesting. So I ask you ATS, what should I do with it? It says to be returned to the masons upon death of owner, but I think i'm gonna keep it.




posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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you wana give it back m8 before they send some cia hitman after you



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by gremlin2011
 


They can have it back if they want it so bad haha



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by leemann123
 


Keep and cherish it... There's no reason to return it as the Scottish Rite Southern Jurisdiction no longer uses it (unfortunately). If there happens to be a dried rose pressed between pages, please take great care, it is of more than a little significance.

The book itself is an excellent source of eclectic thought and reason. There will be those that scoff and will make ill claims regarding your recently found tome... As the profane oft do when faced with unattained knowledge...



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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Unless you believe that there's some special reason, why would you not keep it and read it?

I know I would.



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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Pretty much all religious and secret society documentation is self-supporting circular logic arguements that have little to no verifiable means with the Universe that actually exists. Reality is what exists though no lifeform observed it as such. Flowery, self-perpetuating pseudo-universe that only exists in the group minds that want it to be reality.
edit on 20-7-2011 by tkwasny because: Spelling



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Just reading a few pages sorta blew my mind regarding balance and justice. I will really enjoy reading this it looks like.



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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I read so much anti mason mumbo jumbo about Pike, that i had to buy the book.


Read it for gods sake. There isnt much as well written available anymore. You may or may not like everything you read, but Pike was a genius, and your mind will stretch reading this book.



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by leemann123
 


Excellent, you will have much to ponder, I'm sure. Upon completion of Morals & Dogma, there are several other Masonic texts that can stir the cognitive juices... Focus on what you have before you, but be assured, there is more...

On a side note, neither the book you are now reading or other Masonic titles require membership to read and enjoy... Additional insight by taking the Degrees can provide further Light, but are not necessary...



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by leemann123
It says to be returned to the masons upon death of owner, but I think i'm gonna keep it.


The reason for that is explained in the preface to Morals and Dogma:


THE following work has been prepared by authority of the Supreme Council of the Thirty-third Degree, for the Southern Jurisdiction of the United States, by the Grand Commander, and is now published by its direction. It contains the Lectures of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in that jurisdiction, and is specially intended to be read and studied by the Brethren of that obedience, in connection with the Rituals of the Degrees. It is hoped and expected that each will furnish himself with a copy, and make himself familiar with it; for which purpose, as the cost of the work consists entirely in the printing and binding, it will be furnished at a price as moderate as possible. No individual will receive pecuniary profit from it, except the agents for its sale.


In other words, specialty books can be a financial pain you know where to procure, and one way to keep costs down is to get it back from people who, well, don't need it anymore. As the Scottish Rite no longer furnishes it to members and its contents are available online, feel free to keep and read.



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 03:08 PM
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Yes, read it, and you will learn that Masons--at least Albert Pike--really do believe in a one-world government and that Masons will be the stewards of that system because they are the possessor's of superior knowledge.

There is brilliance in it on a lot of matters, but my own take is that I personally read in it to better understand the occult mindset as I have my own conception of God that differs from Albert Pike's.

A question to Masons: Do y'all believe, as Pike did, that a one world system set up on Masonic principles and governed by Masons to be a worthy goal?



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by The GUT
A question to Masons: Do y'all believe, as Pike did, that a one world system set up on Masonic principles and governed by Masons to be a worthy goal?


No, and I'm fairly sure Pike didn't either. Could you cite the relevant passage(s)?



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by The GUT
Yes, read it, and you will learn that Masons--at least Albert Pike--really do believe in a one-world government and that Masons will be the stewards of that system because they are the possessor's of superior knowledge.


Pike is quite clear in his book that Masons should be loyal to their own individual nations, providing that such nations were not tyrannical. This precludes Pike being in favor of a "one world government".



A question to Masons: Do y'all believe, as Pike did, that a one world system set up on Masonic principles and governed by Masons to be a worthy goal?


As mentioned above, Pike did not believe in a "one world system". Nor did he ever advocate one, nor did he ever any mention one.

As an aside. for those interested, Pike's Morals and Dogma can be read in full here:

www.sacred-texts.com...
edit on 20-7-2011 by Masonic Light because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by OnTheLevel213

Originally posted by The GUT
A question to Masons: Do y'all believe, as Pike did, that a one world system set up on Masonic principles and governed by Masons to be a worthy goal?

No, and I'm fairly sure Pike didn't either. Could you cite the relevant passage(s)?

Maybe I'm mistaken, it's fairly dense reading on the whole and I'm one chopstick short of a pair sometimes, it seems, these days.


Thank you and Masonic Light for answering, but I do believe I found some passages in the past that seemed to suggest that concept to me.

Since I opened my big mouth I'll try to find some time to scan through my pdf and find the parts that hit me that way. If I'm lucky I might have taken some notes.



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 



You are to be true unto all men.

You are to be frank and sincere in all things.

You are to be earnest in doing whatever it is your duty to do.

And no man must repent that he has relied upon your resolve, your profession, or your word.

The great distinguishing characteristic of a Mason is sympathy with his kind. He recognizes in the human race one great family, all connected with himself by those invisible links, and that mighty net-work of circumstance, forged and woven by God.

Feeling that sympathy, it is his first Masonic duty to serve his fellow-man. At his first entrance into the Order, he ceases to be isolated, and becomes one of a great brotherhood, assuming new duties toward every Mason that lives, as every Mason at the same moment assumes them toward him.

Nor are those duties on his part confined to Masons alone. He assumes many in regard to his country, and especially toward the great, suffering masses of the common people; for they too are his brethren, and God hears them, inarticulate as the moanings of their misery are. By all proper means, of persuasion and influence, and otherwise, if the occasion and emergency require, he is bound to defend them against oppression, and tyrannical and illegal exactions.

He labors equally to defend and to improve the people. He does not flatter them to mislead them, nor fawn upon them to rule them, nor conceal his opinions to humor them, nor tell them that they can never err, and that their voice is the voice of God. He knows that the safety of every free government, and its continuance and perpetuity depend upon the virtue and intelligence of the common people; and that, unless their liberty is of such a kind as arms can neither procure nor take away; unless it is the fruit of manly courage, of justice, temperance, and generous virtue--unless, being such, it has taken deep root in the minds and hearts of the people at large, there will not long be wanting those who will snatch from them by treachery what they have acquired by arms or institutions.

He knows that if, after being released from the toils of war, the people neglect the arts of peace; if their peace and liberty be a state of warfare; if war be their only virtue, and the summit of their praise, they will soon find peace the most adverse to their interests. It will be only a more distressing war; and that which they imagined liberty will be the worst of slavery. For, unless by the means of knowledge and morality, not frothy and loquacious, but genuine, unadulterated, and sincere, they clear the horizon of the mind from those mists of error and passion which arise from ignorance and vice, they will always have those who will bend their necks to the yoke as if they were brutes; who, notwithstanding all their triumphs, will put them up to the highest bidder, as if they were mere booty made in war; and find an exuberant source of wealth and power, in the people's ignorance, prejudice, and passions.

The people that does not subjugate the propensity of the wealthy to avarice, ambition, and sensuality, expel luxury from them and their families, keep down pauperism, diffuse knowledge among the poor, and labor to raise the abject from the mire of vice and low indulgence, and to keep the industrious from starving in sight of luxurious festivals, will find that it has cherished, in that avarice, ambition, sensuality, selfishness, and luxury of the one class, and that degradation, misery, drunkenness, ignorance, and brutalization of the other, more stubborn and intractable despots at home than it ever encountered in the field; and even its very bowels will be continually teeming with the intolerable progeny of tyrants.

These are the first enemies to be subdued; this constitutes the campaign of Peace; these are triumphs, difficult indeed, but bloodless; and far more honorable than those trophies which are purchased only by slaughter and rapine; and if not victors in this service, it is in vain to have been victorious over the despotic enemy in the field.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. XI, pp 176–178



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 



Civil and religious Freedom must go hand in hand; and Persecution matures them both. A people content with the thoughts made for them by the priests of a church will be content with Royalty by Divine Right,--the Church and the Throne mutually sustaining each other. They will smother schism and reap infidelity and indifference; and while the battle for freedom goes on around them, they will only sink the more apathetically into servitude and a deep trance, perhaps occasionally interrupted by furious fits of frenzy, followed by helpless exhaustion.

Despotism is not difficult in any land that has only known one master from its childhood; but there is no harder problem than to perfect and perpetuate free government by the people themselves; for it is not one king that is needed: all must be kings. It is easy to set up Masaniello, that in a few days he may fall lower than before. But free government grows slowly, like the individual human faculties; and like the forest-trees, from the inner heart outward. Liberty is not only the common birth-right, but it is lost as well by non-user as by mis-user. It depends far more on the universal effort than any other human property. It has no single shrine or holy well of pilgrimage for the nation; for its waters should burst out freely from the whole soil.

The free popular power is one that is only known in its strength in the hour of adversity: for all its trials, sacrifices and expectations are its own. It is trained to think for itself, and also to act for itself. When the enslaved people prostrate themselves in the dust before the hurricane, like the alarmed beasts of the field, the free people stand erect before it, in all the strength of unity, in self-reliance, in mutual reliance, with effrontery against all but the visible hand of God. It is neither cast down by calamity nor elated by success.

This vast power of endurance, of forbearance, of patience, and of performance, is only acquired by continual exercise of all the functions, like the healthful physical human vigor, like the individual moral vigor. And the maxim is no less true than old, that eternal vigilance is the price of liberty. It is curious to observe the universal pretext by which the tyrants of all times take away the national liberties. It is stated in the statutes of Edward II., that the justices and the sheriff should no longer be elected by the people, on account of the riots and dissensions which had arisen. The same reason was given long before for the suppression of popular election of the bishops; and there is a witness to this untruth in the yet older times, when Rome lost her freedom, and her indignant citizens declared that tumultuous liberty is better than disgraceful tranquillity.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. II, pp 33–34
edit on 20-7-2011 by AlbertPike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 



France became centralized in its government more by the apathy and ignorance of its people than by the tyranny of its kings. When the inmost parish-life is given up to the direct guardianship of the State, and the repair of the belfry of a country church requires a written order from the central power, a people is in its dotage. Men are thus nurtured in imbecility, from the dawn of social life. When the central government feeds part of the people it prepares all to be slaves. When it directs parish and county affairs, they are slaves already. The next step is to regulate labor and its wages.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. II, pp 52–53
edit on 20-7-2011 by AlbertPike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by The GUT
 



It is not the mission of Masonry to engage in plots and conspiracies against the civil government. It is not the fanatical propagandist of any creed or theory; nor does it proclaim itself the enemy of kings. It is the apostle of liberty, equality, and fraternity; but it is no more the high-priest of republicanism than of constitutional monarchy. It contracts no entangling alliances with any sect of theorists, dreamers, or philosophers. It does not know those as its Initiates who assail the civil order and all lawful authority, at the same time that they propose to deprive the dying of the consolations of religion. It sits apart from all sects and creeds, in its own calm and simple dignity, the same under every government.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. IX, p 153



posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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Besides the reading of it.. depending on its printing it can be quite valuable. The small red we have from my husbands grandfather is valued at 400.00. Ive seen them on amazon for between 150-300 as recent as last year.. but hadnt looked this year.

Read it and enjoy it. Just because I read the Book of Mormon didnt mean I woke up a mormon one morning. Im sure you wont become a baby eating satanic scary Mason if you read it



( joke joke.. my husband is a mason and Im oes.. LOL!)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 05:57 AM
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Originally posted by Advantage
Read it and enjoy it. Just because I read the Book of Mormon didnt mean I woke up a mormon one morning. Im sure you wont become a baby eating satanic scary Mason if you read it



( joke joke.. my husband is a mason and Im oes.. LOL!)


didn't they tell you that stuff is supposed to be a secret?
What are they teaching the OES these days?





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