What are you currently reading?

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posted on May, 31 2013 @ 09:57 AM
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Only Revolutions by Mark Z Danielewski. Really interesting book, reminds me of leaves of grass by Walt Whitman. One long continual poem. Finish one side, then you can turn it over and read the counterpart. Highly recommended.




posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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Just read Blood of the Tree - It's an awesome anti-NWO novel

Plus I got it for free on Amazon!

I would def recommend it



posted on Jun, 10 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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Was reading Cyteen by C.J Cherryh. I had this book for years I bought it at a half price book place. However never could get much into it, I dont know I suppose it appeals to some people, but I never got but a few chapters in. This time however I got a few more pages into it then last time. I know because the page mark was still there from years ago, when I first started reading it...I don't know the whole story seems a bit pretentious to me, that and it does not have enough action, to much talking, yada yada. I still don't know why all the characters in the book as far as I read act like they do and what they hell they keep making a big deal of all there little tit tatts and disputes they have, and whatever...Maybe I need to read farther for it to get interesting...Next year maybe.

So ya! After I could go no farther in that book, I stopped by the local book store and picked up a book called..The Lives of Tao - by Wesley Chu. I admit it was the cover that attracted me, after reading the back the story sounded hilarious and it looked like it had way more action, so I got it. Its a interesting book, people on this site may get a kick out of it as it has to do with aliens and bodysnatchers and secret societies, and covert james bond type stuff, nothing all that serious though, it just a plain sort of story. I would not call it the greatest novel ever written, but its enjoyable, I liked it for the few hours it took me to finish reading it. If you got some time to kill, its a interesting and sometimes freaking hilarious in some instances type book.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:32 PM
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I've just started reading Rose Madder by Stephen King.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 05:37 PM
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I just started "Ready Player One" by Ernest Cline

Its science fiction, in the year 2044.

Most folks that like gaming (and the future of gaming) will like this book.

The world is pretty messed up in 2044 and people live in trailer parks (the young hero of the story does), the trailers are stacked up 15-20 high to save space. The book is about the search for a "hidden easter egg", that is somewhere in a virtual world. It was put there by the creator of the game (a billionair) and if you find it you get his empire (he died and that was in his will) so...



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 10:04 AM
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Reading through Sherlock Holmes for the fourth go-round. Never gets old.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 10:09 AM
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This thread



posted on Jun, 21 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by RUFFREADY
I just started "Ready Player One" by Ernest Cline

Its science fiction, in the year 2044.

Most folks that like gaming (and the future of gaming) will like this book.

The world is pretty messed up in 2044 and people live in trailer parks (the young hero of the story does), the trailers are stacked up 15-20 high to save space. The book is about the search for a "hidden easter egg", that is somewhere in a virtual world. It was put there by the creator of the game (a billionair) and if you find it you get his empire (he died and that was in his will) so...



Ok, I'm about 1/2 through. I have to update my above post. Its also a love story (so I think most women and men that like a little romance will like this book) the protagonist falls for a female "avatar" as he's looking for the "easter egg", she's playing hard to get , because she's trying to find it also... it 's getting really good!

Lots of action also.

Ok, no more spoilers just have to put that out there.






posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 09:58 AM
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I read "Les Fourmis (Ants)" of Bernard Werber, a french writer. It's a good book about ants and investigation.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by Jonna
 


I am currently reading an interesting book by William Golding, author of Lord of the Flies. This one is called The Inheritors. "A gripping novel about the beginning of mankind."



Though I am enjoying it, I don't know if it's the writer's fault or if I'm just not paying attention. Many descriptive passages are hard for me to picture in my head. And, there is something called Oa that I have yet to figure out what it is even though I'm almost done with the book. It's either a living thing that hides under the fur of these primitive humans, or it is a reference to gods.

Still, observing these people as they learn how to use their minds is unique. I don't regret reading it.

Note: Just found out it may have been made into a movie. Gonna check that out!



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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Alice In Wonderland



posted on Jul, 2 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Jack Reacher series (audio books, during my commute). The first one was pretty good, so going on with the series. I cannot see Tom Cruise as this role though.....



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 07:17 AM
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I am reading Christine by Stephen King.



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by The_Truth_Seeker
 


The Ranger (Quinn Colson Novels)
by Ace Atkins

I'm reading # 3 book now "the Broken Places", 1 and 2 were kick butt good!!



Synopsis:


After years of war, Army Ranger Quinn Colson returns home to the rugged, rough hill country of northeast Mississippi to find his native Tibbehah County overrun with corruption, decay, meth runners, and violence. His uncle, the longtime county sheriff, is dead. A suicide, he’s told, but others—like tomboy deputy Lillie Virgil—whisper murder.
In the days that follow, it’s up to Colson to discover the truth, not only about his uncle, but about his family, his friends, his town, and himself. And once it’s discovered, there’s no going back for this real hero of the Deep South.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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Just finished Extinction Machine, by Jonathan Maberry.

It's the 5th in a series that is right up the ATS alley. this one covers all things aliens and ufos with and even has a few recognizeable names dropped into the story.

I started a thread about the series here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Great reading.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 11:26 AM
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The Arabian Nights



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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I am reading A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 02:02 PM
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The Valis Trilogy - Philip K. Dick



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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Recently read these two and thought they were great reads, very accessible.

The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography
by Simon Singh
www.amazon.com...


In his first book since the bestselling Fermat's Enigma, Simon Singh offers the first sweeping history of encryption, tracing its evolution and revealing the dramatic effects codes have had on wars, nations, and individual lives. From Mary, Queen of Scots, trapped by her own code, to the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the Allies win World War II, to the incredible (and incredibly simple) logisitical breakthrough that made Internet commerce secure, The Code Book tells the story of the most powerful intellectual weapon ever known: secrecy.



Salt: A World History
by Mark Kurlansky
www.amazon.com...=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375906943&sr=1-1&keywords=SALT


In his fifth work of nonfiction, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind. A substance so valuable it served as currency, salt has influenced the establishment of trade routes and cities, provoked and financed wars, secured empires, and inspired revolutions.


Currently enjoying the crap out of this one! It is very appropriate for the headline news of surveillance and "rogue" hackers


Cryptography Engineering: Design Principles and Practical Applications
Niels Ferguson (Author), Bruce Schneier (Author), Tadayoshi Kohno (Author)
www.amazon.com...=pd_sim_b_10


Cryptography is vital to keeping information safe, in an era when the formula to do so becomes more and more challenging. Written by a team of world-renowned cryptography experts, this essential guide is the definitive introduction to all major areas of cryptography: message security, key negotiation, and key management. You'll learn how to think like a cryptographer. You'll discover techniques for building cryptography into products from the start and you'll examine the many technical changes in the field.

After a basic overview of cryptography and what it means today, this indispensable resource covers such topics as block ciphers, block modes, hash functions, encryption modes, message authentication codes, implementation issues, negotiation protocols, and more. Helpful examples and hands-on exercises enhance your understanding of the multi-faceted field of cryptography.



posted on Aug, 7 2013 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


If you like crypto you should take a stab at Kryptos:

en.wikipedia.org...

www.elonka.com...





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