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Just a question about anasthetics....

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posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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Hi everyone, I was listening to a guy on that Coast to Coast show the other night and he mentioned something which I had never thought about before. Anyway to cut to the point, he mentioned how anasthetics can be dangerous to people if too much is given to a patient, or even a bad reaction I guess while they are in surgery. He goes on to mention that the doctors in this situation have people on the brink of death with anasthetics, but obviously can control the amount so you don't slip into a coma or it becomes fatal.

I have only had one operation and a general anasthetic in my life. Looking back though to when I was recovering after the operation, I remember not having any dreams etc while the operation was taking place... I was just wanting to ask whether anyone else while under has had dreams, visions etc, because from what I can remember, I could of died at the table and I would not of known it... What I'm actually getting at is, maybe there is nothing after we pass away if this is a controlled encounter with the other side.

I will have to find the link if anyone wants to listen to the video but apart from that fire away, cheers...




posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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How often do you remember your dreams when you wake up in the morning or whatever hour. I surely don't remember most of my dreams unless ofcourse I think to myself just before going to sleep that I will remember my dreams. Mostly you will only remember the last one just before you wake up. Then you will have to write it down real quick otherwise you will forget all about it and no matter how much you try to remember it you will not. That is how the mind seems to work. I have been under while having operations and I don't remember any dreams just the pain that comes when you wake up. Sorry. But this is my only answer I can give you. Perhaps others here might give you something better.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Iam not going to get specific,but there are some very incompetent humans working in hospitals, espescially Public ones.

For every competent caring Doctor or nurse you have maybe have two sociopathic imbeciles, who you would swear must be impostors.

My wife recently had a day surgery procrdure and let me tell ya , if you believed in conspiracy theories, ya would swear they were actors who couldn't remember their lines.

No one knows what happens when they go under, better not to even speculate...there are some very scary medical people out there.
edit on 14-7-2011 by Dr Expired because: spelin



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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I have also had this same thought. When I had surgery earlier this year in March, I did not dream at all. It was like "Boom" you're out, then "Boom" you're awake...sort of...I think I drifted in and out for about two hours, talking nonsense and stuff like that. Anyway, I do wonder why only some of the people who die on the table have out of body/near death experencies..see heaven etc...but then there are those who did die on the table, were brought back, and saw nothing. If that were the case,then why wouldn't everyone see heaven or whatever? I have yet to hear about any people or persons using this method to put themselves to sleep to test the theory. I belive there is something after this, but I feel there are some transitions your soul has to go threw, and just being dead for a small amount of time isn't enough to get there. I dunno, I can't wait to read what others think! Great topic!



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:47 PM
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You aren't on the "brink of death" when you are under general anesthesia. Your heart and lungs are working just fine. The only reason they intubate you while under anesthesia is to get what's called a "controlled airway". This is in case you DO have a bad reaction to the anesthetic. Often, this reaction involves your airway swelling up, which can obviously prevent you from breathing. However, if you have an intubation tube in place, you have a secure, constant flow of oxygen. Granted, these bad reactions are pretty infrequent, but it's still a good practice. Better safe than sorry, you know?



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


Its more about the concerntration of the anasthetic if you know what I mean... If they were to pump you up with more of it, you could possibly slip into a coma or possibly die, so how far along are we when they are actually controlling what is going into your body... Brink of death is the wrong words, my apologies..., but i guess it would be the same as being concussed without the drugs... you wake up and think where the hell am I and what happened...



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by Redevilfan09
 


Whenever you are under general anesthesia, the amount of drugs being given are VERY tightly controlled. Additionally, your breathing, heart rate, and blood oxygen content are monitored in real time by either an anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist, whose sole job in the OR is to watch your vital signs for abnormalities.

The rate of complications with anesthesia goes up with your own risks, obviously. If you have a history of heart or lung issues, your risk of heart or lung complications with general anesthesia goes up. If you are a healthy individual, your risk of complications is very, very, very low.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by VneZonyDostupa
reply to post by Redevilfan09
 


Whenever you are under general anesthesia, the amount of drugs being given are VERY tightly controlled. Additionally, your breathing, heart rate, and blood oxygen content are monitored in real time by either an anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist, whose sole job in the OR is to watch your vital signs for abnormalities.

The rate of complications with anesthesia goes up with your own risks, obviously. If you have a history of heart or lung issues, your risk of heart or lung complications with general anesthesia goes up. If you are a healthy individual, your risk of complications is very, very, very low.


Is it normal for a student medical person to be allowed to try and put the needle into a person about to go under, whilst the qualified Anaethnetist is writing notes?

My partner experienced this recently and the student was totally incompetent and was trying to put this needle at a 90 degree angle into her vein,,the pain was excrutiating for my partner ...the mistake was corrected when the qualified one looked up and saw the imbecilic student (from Asis I believe ) trying to butcher my partner.
This is just on epart of my wifes experience recently.



posted on Jul, 15 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by Dr Expired
 


Unfortunately, at a teaching hospital (which would be pretty much any hospital associated with a university), yes, it is common for students to be the ones starting lines, injecting meds, etc.

Luckily, while your partner experienced some pain, the actual dosing of medications and monitoring of vitals is VERY tightly controlled, so there was no risk to your partner's health or well-being. It's still unfortunate that they has to have such an unskilled person practicing on them. When I was a student, we had skills labs that taught us suturing, IV placement, and phlebotomy on pigs LONG before we ever did it on humans.



posted on Jul, 16 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


Thanks for that information, my Partner conveyed to me the Student in question looked terrified and very very nervous , luckily she didn't stab my wife in the eye or something.
Yes there is a University next to the hospital, so that explains it, I have been told once that some foreign students most notably Indians doctor their Uni qualifications to gain entrance to medical degree courses in the west, and notice I have said some.
This if true is outrageous but may explain a Indian doctor once telling me a new lesion on my side was a birthmark and not to worry, he said this whilst grinning.
Needless to say Iam still dumbfounded by the experience today.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by Dr Expired
 


Well, the path that foreign medical graduates take is a bit different. They can either attend university in their home country and then attend medical school here, in which case they have exactly the same medical qualifications and education as an American student, or they can attend medical school in their home country and then must take a series of licensing exams in the USA before they can practice, in which case they may or may not be as clinically skilled.






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