I'm thinking of becoming a Freemason.

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posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by Rob37n
I hope you like drinking! It can be an expensive hobby being a mason, especially if you progress up the ladder. There comes a point where the cost can seriously damage your wallet.

It might be cheaper to take up another hobby, model railways, photography, alchemy, that sort of thing.


yea, the $65 a year is KILLIN me!

Model Railways? you don't get out much do you?




posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:55 AM
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reply to post by Saurus
 


I have all those, except 21 years? I thought it was 18. So I guess its the age, then. And I originally said I might not be 100% qualified because I read somewhere that I need to be able to take care of a whole family, or something like that, which I technically can't, because, well I'm not THAT independent. But if the age really is minimum of 21 years old, then it would make sense on how someone could take care of a family, if you know what I mean.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:56 AM
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reply to post by mjleonid12
 


If you are thinking of applying to become a Mason, simply contact your local Lodge. They will arrange to meet you and have an informal chat with you to see if the Masons are right for you and that you are right for the Masons. Do not wait to be invited as we never invite anyone to join. As we say, you must be free and of good report. You must join FM of your own free will.

I wish you all the best in your endeavour.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 


Thank you very much! And yes, that is what I'm planing on doing.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 06:22 AM
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Don't try to be a Mason in the Chicago area.

I wanted to be a Mason at one point.

Then I met some.

I've been told that these people in the Chicago area are seriously breaking their vows.

Watch your back if you meet a Mason from the Chicago area.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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Well, as the Worshipful Grand Master (or whatever title it was) a friend of mine had to cough up for the hire of a 4* hotel at a choice UK resort for two nights, organise dinner, entertainement, etc for the two nights, and also buy a nice present to be presented to each of the ladies present at the weekend. The cost of that shindig ran into thousands! That's a lot of model railway, photographic, or whatever other hobby you may choose to indulge.

I agree the $65 dollars is a reasonable price to join a gentleman's club, but there can be serious implications if you choose to rise up in the ranks. That's all I am saying.

I have nothing against the Masons at all, if I were a drinking man I'd join in an instant.

Maybe the American Rights and organisation are different from how it works in the UK?



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by KatieVA
Don't you have to be recommended and invited in by someone who is already a freemason? You can't just decide you want to join.


Recommended? Yes. Invited? No.

You have to be sponsored by two Masons in good standing. It isn't the end of the world if you don't know any Masons as Masonry pretty much skipped a generation (at least in North America). I was in the same boat and just Googled the local Masonic lodge, explained my situation to the lodge secretary and he helped on the sponsorship front.

As has been pointed out previously, members inviting can happen although it's frowned upon. You're supposed to be joining of your own free will and accord and with a favourable opinion preconceived of the fraternity.

HTH and good luck in 2014 when you can join.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Rob37n
 


Here in the USA, the Lodge generally covers those expenses, not the Master personally.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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Originally posted by mjleonid12
reply to post by Saurus
 


I have all those, except 21 years? I thought it was 18. So I guess its the age, then. And I originally said I might not be 100% qualified because I read somewhere that I need to be able to take care of a whole family, or something like that, which I technically can't, because, well I'm not THAT independent. But if the age really is minimum of 21 years old, then it would make sense on how someone could take care of a family, if you know what I mean.


A point I make with new Masons is that three duties are supposed to be attended to before dealing with Masonry: family, work and faith. These are the three most important responsibilities of any man (Mason or not) and to leave any of them untended or under-attended is to invite disaster over the long haul as well as to miss out on some of the most important lessons Masonry has to offer.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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reply to post by Rob37n
 


Since the Worshipful Master is the big boss, and controls the entire finances of his lodge, and chooses what functions or events do or don't happen, and has the entire funds of the lodge at his disposal to host such functions ore events if he so wishes, I'd suggest that his weekend out and spending spree was entirely voluntary.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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Age varies by state I believe. I am almost certain here in Indiana it is 18, however it is 21 in some states. If you have any questions you can message me. I doubt you are in Indiana, but if you are I can help you out.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by mjleonid12
reply to post by Saurus
 


I have all those, except 21 years? I thought it was 18. So I guess its the age, then.


Different jurisdictions have different rules. 21 was the traditional age, but it's dropped in a lot of places.


And I originally said I might not be 100% qualified because I read somewhere that I need to be able to take care of a whole family


You may have extrapolated from one of two things:

A) A man should not become a Mason if the extra financial obligation would take away from his ability to provide for his family.

B) As a Mason, you must be willing to be called upon (as a function of the lodge) to aid in the relief of a distressed brother and, if deceased, his family.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:22 AM
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reply to post by mjleonid12
 


Good for you!!


In Florida the age dropped to 18 a year or two ago. Some states are still 21.

You must believe in "a single, ever-living God." Remember that the name of the deity is not important, but for simplicities sake, when you are asked, it is much easier to just say God, Allah, YHWH or whatever. There are some places where a long explanation as to how you define your God will just be cumbersome and unnecessary. In Lodge the creator is more commonly referred to as The Grand Architect of the Univerise GAOTU. Don't get to hung up on the idea that "God" equals a Christian God. It isn't that important. That is just friendly advice to smooth your entry along.

A person does not have to be "invited" or "related" to join Freemasonry. In fact, it is just the opposite. Masons do not recruit. A prospective member has to approach us first. We will never ask someone to become a Mason, they must ask us. Some states have gotten tight on money and kind of forgotten that rule, and started to advertise, but the tradition is that we never approach anyone, they approach us.

I suggest googling "Grand Lodge of........" for your state, and you will be able to find the age limit, and you will be able to locate some lodges near you.

Good Luck!!



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Rob37n
 

You don't need to be a drinker to move up the ladder nor does your finances suffer from moving up the ladder.

Most of my drinking was with my junior officers and my now successors in the Eastern Chair. At the Grand body's annual meeting sometimes they'll have a social hour before the banquet, but its voluntary to drink.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by KSigMason
 


In Florida there is no drinking in Freemasonry. We can't even rent the lodge to a group that wants to drink. The drinkers join the Shriners and go to the Oasis.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by Saurus
 


Undoubtedly he chose to fund the event, and he was very proud to do so. He felt strongly that it was his duty having risen to the post.

A good time was had by all.




posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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Yet another thread of inquiry from the curious, and answers from the uninformed speculators until the breathren show up and clear the table. I am thankful for the brethren here to step in and ensure the proper information gets out there.

For both the curious and the misinformed: the ONLY way to learn more about masonry is to visit a lodge, talk to master masons and ask questions. Of course, not everything will be revealed to you - for that, you must make a decision for yourself as to whether you wish to join.

For the OP - it appears to me, based on your statements about your spirituality, that you may find the rituals and teaching of the Blue Lodge quite interesting; however, I think you will be even more intrigued by continuing thereafter to the York and Scottish Rites.

Here's to you finding comfort in your decision and in your path.



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by Saurus
Since the Worshipful Master is the big boss, and controls the entire finances of his lodge, and chooses what functions or events do or don't happen, and has the entire funds of the lodge at his disposal to host such functions ore events if he so wishes, I'd suggest that his weekend out and spending spree was entirely voluntary.


In my jurisdiction, the Worshipful Master has nowhere near that sort of authority. He can only spend $100 of Lodge funds without official Lodge consent. Generally, the WM doesn't control any of the finances, as that's done collectively by the Finance Committee (of which the WM is chairman, having one vote). However, the Finance Committee can only give recommendations to the Lodge, which have to approve all questions of finance by majority ballot.
edit on 14-7-2011 by Masonic Light because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by Masonic Light
 


As Master of my lodge , I can not spend one red cent without approval of the Craft . As a matter of fact , no one has that authority . Every dollar spent is brought to the floor of the lodge for approval .

To be honest I would not want complete control over lodge funds as it belongs to the entire lodge .



posted on Jul, 14 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by whenandwhere
As Master of my lodge , I can not spend one red cent without approval of the Craft . As a matter of fact , no one has that authority . Every dollar spent is brought to the floor of the lodge for approval.


This is not true in my jurisdiction. I could spend every penny the lodge has without any approval from the membership. It is obviously not a smart tact to take so expenses are typically brought up for motions (which do not have to be entertained) and votes.





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