Water And Life On Mars

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posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 11:56 AM
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I believe Mars is habitable, and habitated. Has flowing water, and flora.
I believe the reason this Mars information is supressed and ridiculed, is because when our world "ends", like some big event, the "chosen elites" will go to Mars to escape. That's why this information about life and water on Mars cannot be allowed to come out.

The scenario, I believe, will be just like that movie, 2012, except it won't be giant water Arks, it will be a smaller select few going to Mars.




posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


Mars reminds me of something, like a peak into the future of what Earth can be.

Second.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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This thread is reopened.
edit on Sun Jul 10 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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Sorry for that delay guys, there was an issue with an article that copied my thread and posted it on their website, and my OP was mistook as a copy and paste of that article so it got temporarily closed.

The OP should be back to normal anytime now, so carry on the discussion.
 



I believe Mars is habitable, and habitated. Has flowing water, and flora.
I wouldn't exactly say it has flowing water on the surface, but I would definitely agree that underground there is both liquid and frozen water. I also believe that bacterial life probably exists where the ice/water exists.


I believe the reason this Mars information is supressed and ridiculed, is because when our world "ends", like some big event, the "chosen elites" will go to Mars to escape. That's why this information about life and water on Mars cannot be allowed to come out.
Who's suppressing it? NASA releases the information on their website, it's made public, nobody's hiding it. If anything, the mainstream media is at fault for wasting people's time with BS stories, such as the Royal Wedding or Casey Anthony, that distract us from the real groundbreaking discoveries that everybody should be interested in.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


The current theory is that the iron core of Mars cooled down, thus slowly depleting its own magnetic field, and allowing radiation from the sun to do its dirty work on the planet. All of this while slowly moving further and further away from the sun.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


Great post,

Although, I cannot help but laugh at the current theories about life on Mars. I mean, current life on Mars. I can't believe that people actually think that there are aliens on that planet, living out their lives.

Elsewhere in the universe, yes, for sure. But not on Mars, not without space craft.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by PubertySpider001
 

Great post,

Although, I cannot help but laugh at the current theories about life on Mars. I mean, current life on Mars. I can't believe that people actually think that there are aliens on that planet, living out their lives.

Elsewhere in the universe, yes, for sure. But not on Mars, not without space craft.


Yeah, remember this image?:
I can't imagine complex life forms like "bigfoot" here roaming the arid surface of Mars. Bacterial life forms are definitely a possibility though, I don't think that can be ruled out since there is still both frozen and liquid water on the planet.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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What if we are looking at this the wrong way, instead of looking for life that once existed on mars, what if we are looking at a planet that is beginning its process of forming life?



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
...I'm still in the camp that liquid water didn't ever flow on Mars, for whatever that is worth. Liquid water simply can't exist on the surface of Mars, I believe those signatures are from something else, respectfully.


What I meant to say (but ran out of editing time) was:

"Having said that, I believe water could have once flowed freely on Mars, possibly creating seas or even oceans."

I'm not in the camp that water definitely once flowed on Mars in relatively large quantities, but I don't have too many reasons to doubt that water once flowed freely, either. As you pointed out, many of the features attributed to ancient seas on Mars, such as apparent shorelines, could have been caused by wind erosion.

However, evidence such as:

- the "blueberries", or spherical hematite concretions,
- larger features that look like dried-up river deltas, and
- the sulfate material dug up by Spirit's stuck wheel

gives me cause to believe that water possibly did once exist on Mars in relatively large quantities. The hematite and sulfates, especially, are a strong indication of standing water deposits. Whether that standing water was a puddle, ocean, or something in between has yet to be determined.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


I've seen those blowout pics of water remains flowing down sides of craters and such. Mars had Oceans and lakes long ago, and then whatever happened made mars lose it's atmosphere and boil off most of it's water. This answer could be answered if we are able to get a lander with heavy duty digger or auger to drill into the soil. Just with those tires, it revealed ice water and salts. It would be even better if we could get people onto the planet, but that is still far off. I believe and others have too (Richard Hoagland, etc.) that Mars was a moon of a planet that exploded (which formed much of the asteroid belt and threw debris around the system, wonder about the asteroids that made the dinosaurs extinct).



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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I imagine Mars is full of spiders. That's were we get our fears from.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 07:02 PM
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Awesome post OP. I for one am a firm believer that Nasa is not telling us truth about what has been found on Mars, big shock, I know. I remember one time seeing a phtograph from one of the Mars rovers that depicted blue skies and brown soil. Nasa immediately cut the broadcast and returned with a false orange color enhanced version of the same photo.






posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by hoghead cheese
 

This answer could be answered if we are able to get a lander with heavy duty digger or auger to drill into the soil. Just with those tires, it revealed ice water and salts. It would be even better if we could get people onto the planet, but that is still far off
It's funny that you say that, because at the end of The Universe episode, an astronomer said that we will never truly know just how much water is underneath the surface and if life exists until humans are actually there. Until we set up a system of actually doing some serious digging and drilling, we will only have surface clues that indicate whether or not life/water are present.

All of the evidence makes it pretty clear though, water definitely was on the surface of Mars at one point, and seems to still exist underground. There are some clues that life was present too, but not any absolute proof. Hopefully if our government gets it's priorities straight and quits spending most of the taxpayer money on wars, we can get the space-travel ball rolling and find out for sure if life exists on Mars. IMO that should be one of humanities top 5 priorities: exploring the universe.

Titan, a moon of one of the outer planets, is also thought to possibly harbor life, because it's thought to have deep oceans underneath the surface. There's another moon of the outer planets that's thought to have liquid water oceans too, I want to say Europa, but I could have it mixed up. The moon I'm referring to has a cracked eggshell like surface, it's covered in ice that's constantly shifting and cracking, I think because of the tidal forces from the planet that it orbits. So just in our solar system we have three possible bodies that could have life, Earth excluded. That's just one solar system, and there are thought to be around 50 billion planets in the Milky Way Galaxy alone. And that's just one galaxy out of hundreds of billions or even trillions in the visible universe.



I believe and others have too (Richard Hoagland, etc.) that Mars was a moon of a planet that exploded (which formed much of the asteroid belt and threw debris around the system, wonder about the asteroids that made the dinosaurs extinct).
I've never heard of that theory, but I've heard a similar one that the asteroid belt most likely came from a destroyed or failed planet. I would find your theory more believable that it was actually flipped; Mars had a moon that was destroyed and it formed the asteroid belt. I feel that Mars is too big to be a moon of an inner planet, but I could be wrong, because there's a moon in our solar system, Ganymede I think, that's MUCH bigger than Earth's moon.

If I could pick a body for life to evolve on, I would pick one of Saturn's moons, because imagine looking in the sky and seeing those huge rings every day. That would be awesome.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 08:01 PM
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Mars looks like a dried up Earth.Maybe it looked like Earth before and maybe it was hit by an asteroid or meteor or something?

They should get some water,freeze it,then send it to mars.Freezing the water would make easier for transport!And lots of plants for oxygen.I bet it would change the atmosphere into a more suitable planet to live on.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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Jupiter's moon Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system, Titan next, both are larger than Mercury, another Jovian moon Callisto is slightly smaller than Mercury. If Ganymede somehow escaped the Jovian system, it would be classified as a planet, according to NASA, it has an iron-metallic core that generates a magnetic field.

The current asteroid belt is believed to contain only a small fraction of the mass of the primordial belt. Computer simulations suggest that the original asteroid belt may have contained mass equivalent to the Earth. Primarily because of gravitational perturbations, most of the material was ejected from the belt within about a million years of formation, leaving behind less than 0.1% of the original mass. There has been no observed deviation of the mass of the main asteroid belt, it has been relatively stable for millenniums.

One has to realize the main asteroid belt is very vast, and it's not really that crowded out there.



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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Nice read.

I just wanted to mention the axis wobble of Mars. I was wondering if it were necessary to maintain a steady spin to properly hold a giant body of water? Or at the least, what kind of effects it would have on an ocean size body of water.

I know that this is a representation of earth. I believe it shows the variance of wobble compared to Mars. I was going to paste the link but it is way to long.


I mean if the planet is all over the place "wobbling" enough to affect the seasons, then it would definitely play a role in an ocean body........

Just a thought. S&F
edit on 10-7-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 






Water is one answer. Lava flows is another possible answer. Using our own Moon as an example, the side of the Moon that faces the Earth has fewer visible impact craters because lava flows the created the "mare" has flattened out that part of the surface (and, no, it's not because the Earth was shielding that side of the Moon. The Earth is too far from the Moon to make that big a difference). Having said that, I believe water once flowed freely on Mars, possibly creating seas or even oceans.


I think the laval flat areas on the moon otherwise known as 'seas' if i'm correct are actually created by a collosal impact not volcanoes so its totally different than the mars lava flows.

Laval flows don't typically cover the entire hemisphere and make it devoid of any craters.

Heres a picture of where the lava flows end from mars Largest volcano

Notice how the Lava Flows from the Volcanoes form a shelf or a rise in elevations per-se.

How can the entire Northern Hemi-sphere be de-void of craters from an impact.

This doesn't really make sense unless there were 3-4 major collosal impacts on all 4 sides of Mars near to the point when there weren't many objects left colliding with planets in our early solar system.

When the solar-system was much more violent .... impacts all the time.

Because the Northern area(Sea)(Former Ocean) Is actually devoid of many impacts like the south.

I'd like to think that and its most-likely was an ocean considering all the water Co2 on the planet and the presence of hematite.

Many people don't like to think this though. I can't see why.


Now for the other option if an impact crater caused the entire smooth surface of the northern hemisphere.



I doubt this had happened because if such a large object had caused this most likely would have wiped out all craters on the surface. It just doesn't make sense.


But this does




reply to post by Illustronic
 
edit on 10-7-2011 by TheUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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Great thread mate
but for anyone who isn't up to speed this is old news but still thanks for letting anyone that didn't have a clue know



posted on Jul, 11 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by sith9157
Awesome post OP. I for one am a firm believer that Nasa is not telling us truth about what has been found on Mars, big shock, I know. I remember one time seeing a phtograph from one of the Mars rovers that depicted blue skies and brown soil. Nasa immediately cut the broadcast and returned with a false orange color enhanced version of the same photo.


Nice one. It could be that Mars robots were really exploring Death Valley here on Earth and not Mars.

"Oops, our colour filter broke down, oh, wait, all fine now - we're back on Mars."



posted on Jul, 11 2011 @ 07:01 AM
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If it was abundant with life as it was believed to have been once, it is still very likely there is still small fertile pockets of life littered around the planet's equator, anyone would be arrogant to assume otherwise.





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