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Geomagnetic Pole Reversals: Part 2 (Effects on Life)

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posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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Geomagnetic Pole Reversals: Part 2 (Effects on Life)

There has been quite a lot of talk about a sudden pole reversal happening for whatever reason recently, I am undecided but I think this is as good a time as any for Part 2 of my Pole Reversal/Pole Shift threads!

A quick catch up and then we'll pick up where I left off here.

A lot of people confuse the two. A pole reversal is where the two poles switch and replace each other quite suddenly and a pole shift is the poles moving over time, often thousands of years before they settle. Scientists have discovered that pole reversals have occurred at irregular intervals throughout history, on average about once every 300,000 years. The last pole reversal was about 780,000 years ago. There is also the 'cataclysmic pole shift hypothesis' which suggests that there have been geologically rapid shifts in the positions of the poles and the axis of rotation of the Earth, creating disasters such as floods and tectonic events. I will be touching on this in Part 3 of this series of threads.

This is going to be a very speculative thread and I require a lot of input and speculation on your behalves! You see no-one really knows exactly what the effects of a sudden pole shift/pole reversal would have for life and geology on earth. It is entirely reasonable to assume that the magnetic field around our earth would diminish very rapidly and and it would take at least a little while for our magnetosphere to build back up again. Whenever it built back up again it would be quite different anatomically than the one we currently have. (Obviously considering the poles have just flipped very quickly and in a very short amount of time) It would most certainly take a lot of adjusting on behalf of life on earth. Pole shifts are easy to adjust to as they are a slow steady process. Pole reversals on the other hand are theoretically in a completely different ball park.

Cells in the human body require a pulsed magnetic field and magnetic resonance stimulation in order to catalyze the reactions that take place every second. When Yuri Gagarin made that historic first manned flight into space we did not know how vital these two processes were to life on earth. Because these two processes were not simulated by technology for Yuri Gagarin when he left earth he experienced depressed metabolism, mental depression, bone loss, muscle degeneration, impaired perception and over all fatigue.

Yuri Gagarin was only in space for 108 minutes.. I can only imagine what prolonged magnetic malnourishment would do to life on earth. But not only that, when the magnetic field stabilises it will be completely different anatomically than what it is now. So how different will our cells react if we do survive long enough to 'Adapt' to this new field?

This subject really interests me and I wish I could speculate further on what effects this would have on us but I honestly don't know seeing as a pole reversal has never happened in our recorded history. (Supposedly). I have obviously only touched on the potential problems a sudden pole reversal could cause for life on earth..

Any thoughts?
-TechUnique




posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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If the effects that Gagarin suffered in 108 minutes were so bad, how come our apollo, shuttle, and ISS crews dont die being up there for so long? They're often in space on the ISS for months at a time, sure they have some issues that come from weightlessness, but I hardly think it's due to magnetism.



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by Mapkar
If the effects that Gagarin suffered in 108 minutes were so bad, how come our apollo, shuttle, and ISS crews dont die being up there for so long? They're often in space on the ISS for months at a time, sure they have some issues that come from weightlessness, but I hardly think it's due to magnetism.


We have technology that simulates the earth's magnetic field.
In all space suits/space stations/space shuttles.
It is vital.



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by Mapkar
If the effects that Gagarin suffered in 108 minutes were so bad, how come our apollo, shuttle, and ISS crews dont die being up there for so long? They're often in space on the ISS for months at a time, sure they have some issues that come from weightlessness, but I hardly think it's due to magnetism.



Because they HAVE THE TECH NOW !

didn't you read his post ?

He said Yuri DID NOT HAVE THE TECH YET ! DUH !!!

people....seriously please read before you post.



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 


I appreciate the kind response, as a matter of fact I did read the post.

I just find the fact that we've apparently had this technology all along and we've never made mention of it. The fact that the Apollo missions circled the moon and were fine is the main thing that seems weird about this theory. I'm not bashing it, I was just curious about that.

Since this technology is both vital and compact enough to be suit portable why can't the average Joe somehow construct such a device to keep them safe?



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by Mapkar
reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 


I appreciate the kind response, as a matter of fact I did read the post.

I just find the fact that we've apparently had this technology all along and we've never made mention of it. The fact that the Apollo missions circled the moon and were fine is the main thing that seems weird about this theory. I'm not bashing it, I was just curious about that.

Since this technology is both vital and compact enough to be suit portable why can't the average Joe somehow construct such a device to keep them safe?


Magnetic Stimulation Simulators but they are expensive!



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by Mapkar
 


Because they learned their lesson. Astronauts still suffer from some effects of space flight, but because we now take steps to mimic earth conditions in space, people don't go through the same level of difficulties that yuri did.



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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I suppose a good question to ask is if we just need a strong magnetic field or if we specifically need one of the same time earth has. Even if we could all build/afford the beastly magnetic devices that the shuttles use, would it do us any good?

The human body, more especially the brain, is known for it's ability to adapt to changing conditions. When a brain receives damage it tries its hardest to rewire itself to make due. So when the pole reversal occurs and our magnetosphere starts to rebuild itself, I suspect our body would attempt to adapt to it.

That said, if a lack of a field can affect an unprotected astronaut both mentally and psychically (thought I'm more interested in the mental part) then a changed field, if the body reacts differently to the new field, could change us mentally as well.

I won't go into any discussions about any awakenings or anything like that, but our civilizations after the reversal could very well be fundamentally different. I for one believe we will survive and continue after what ever dire times we go through, but that's not the point of this discussion.

Onto my next question! If the human body and mind react to SPECIFIC configurations of the magnetic field, and if said field is shifting physically and in power, could we not assume that it would be having an affect on mankind as a whole?

Say what you will about 'it's always been this way' but can you honestly look at the world today and tell me that the humans who inhabit it seem entirely stable?

Not only the human equation, but in part one, one of the sources you linked mentioned a Danish study that suggested that the magnetic field and it's shifting around could be having a significant effect on our climate. If we are seeing an effect now, as the shifting is still within a narrow geographical area, then what happens when the whole world is free game for the wandering poles? Now if that doesn't happen, then at the very least, when they reverse and the field suffers some power loss during that time, there could be some extreme weather patterns. For what ever reasons. I'm no meteorologist.

Finally, and this theory has been put forth by other people, not just mine, but I think it has some merit. Bear in mind that the earths crust is more or less magnetically charged. Near the Atlantic ridge where new crust is being formed, you can actually track the changing magnetic orientations in strips as the poles reversed in earths antiquity. It'll go North South North South and so on and so forth. Every time the poles have reversed in the past, the earths crust has picked up a new orientation. Now if the crust is magnetic, and presumably with equal parts north and south as we've been experiencing these reversals for a long time, then when a suitably powerful magnetic force suddenly moves in one direction or another, I think there would be a pull on the crust from it. Crustal Displacement. That's a whole new ball of wax.
edit on 9-7-2011 by Vaykun because: (no reason given)






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