Heroic Actions On The Battlefield

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posted on Sep, 8 2004 @ 10:26 PM
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Originally posted by tomcat
... the V.C is definately harder to recieve than a Purple Heart (or 8).


Thats what I thought, but I wasnt sure...

[edit on 2004/11/6 by Hellmutt]




posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by Popeye
LACHHIMAN GURUNG (Reg. No 709)
Rifleman (later Havildar*) 8th Gurkha Rifles, Indian Army.
Born on 30th December 1917 at Dakhani (village), Tanhu, Nepal.

...now alone and disregarding his wounds, loaded and fired his rifle with his left hand for four hours, calmly wainting for each attack which he met with fire at point-blank range.

87 of the enemy dead were killed by C company. 31 were dead in front of Lachhiman Gurung's position. He is reported as shouting "Come and fight. Come and fight. I will kill you."


Sorry I shortened your entry in this quote
(visit original post on page 4 for full, original entry).
I just wanted to point out these details.

Gotta have respect for that...
That was one hell of a guy.



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 06:59 AM
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Great Topic!!!!

Well i could go on and on but im short on time so......

The Red Baron.
It was common for him to shoot a british aircraft down and then land next to the downed enemy airman and thank him for the the thrill of the engagement,shake hands and take off again.

Paddy Dunblane-ww2 sas hero who would often enter german airfields in the deserts and when running out of explosives and ammunition would physically tear enemy equipment apart with his bare hands whilst using a knife to kill german soldiers.

My grandad-awarded a medal for single handedly riding a 500cc norton around in front of a german machine gun bunker to draw fire away from a pinned down british recon patrol,he was shot several times in the arm and legs,survived and went on to take part in D-Day.


will put some more down later,great topic!!



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 08:20 AM
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This is an excellent topic, but its very difficult to anwser. Naturally I have to say my great-grandfather. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge during WWII. All but him and another guy in his unit were killed yet he remained fighting for freedom. Sadly his finger was shot off and then he was taken prisoner. Right know his purple heart is on display in the room were I am typing this.

But other than people I know I'm going to have to say anybody who ever served in a war. I feel that if a person serve in a war and fights for freedom they're already a hero in my book.



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 08:39 AM
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But other than people I know I'm going to have to say anybody who ever served in a war. I feel that if a person serve in a war and fights for freedom they're already a hero in my book.


A fine point.



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 09:03 AM
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I feel all who serve for freedom are hearos, but hear is a story I do like.
Corp Einar H Ingman.
Ingman joined the army in 1948 at the age of 19. In feb. 1951 hi regiment was fighting a series of skirmishes with the chinise when the squad leader was killed. Ingman assumed comand, later the leader of another squad was wounded, ingman took over that squad as well. While he was leading the two squads against a machine gun nest, a grenade exploded a foot away from his head, blowing off his ear. Ignoring this he charged ahead with his bayonet, only to be struck full in the face with a rifle bullet. Dazed he leaped forward killing 10 chinese with bayonet and rifle. Then he staggered away and collapsed. Later he said, "that bullet through my head kind of made me quit thinking."

[edit on 1-10-2004 by Red Golem]



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 09:21 AM
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For personal bias I'd have to vote my father, a 14 year verteran of the Special forces Green Berets who served in Vietnam, behind enemy lines.

Now, when it comes to bravery I'd have to say when the American Colonial Army gave the collective middle finger to the Brittish Empire. Well, maybe that should be considered for biggest balls in military history


Food for thought, the story of the Spartans could be correlated to the Iraqi "insurgants" fighting us off. Valour is determined by the winner



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 01:31 PM
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Originally posted by optimus fett
...when running out of explosives and ammunition would physically tear enemy equipment apart with his bare hands whilst using a knife to kill german soldiers.


Now that sounds incredible...



Originally posted by optimus fett
My grandad-awarded a medal for single handedly riding a 500cc norton around in front of a german machine gun bunker to draw fire away from a pinned down british recon patrol,he was shot several times in the arm and legs,survived and went on to take part in D-Day.


Went on to D-Day after that stunt!

Brave grandad...

Looking forward to hear more...



posted on Oct, 1 2004 @ 02:22 PM
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For me the Answer to this question would be all the Men, Women that fought in the First World War.This has been forgotten as the people who survived have now passed along with there memories.
For me one man stands out that is Captain Noel Chavasse of the Royal Army Medical Officer to the 10th Battalion,the Kings (Liverpool Regiment) The LIverpool Scottish.He is the only person of that conflict to recieve the Victoria Cross (Bar) Twice.Second time was during the battle for Passchendaele known as the third battle of Ypres.In that battle total British casualties are still unknown but have been estimated around 100,000.The battle lasted between 31 July - 10 November 1917.Sixty Victoria Crosses were awarded between these dates.The cemetries at Passchendale Ridge tell there own story. the largest Tyne Cot contains 12,000 graves of known British and Commonwealth Soliders.The names of 34,000 others who last resting place is unknown.The Menin Gate commemerates a further 60,000 dead from Britain and the commonwealth who have no known graves.The Liverpool regiment lost all 955 men and officers.
His second Victoria Cross was recommended after the following action.

During an attack he tended the wounded in the open all day under heavy fire,frequently in view of the enemy.During the ensuing night he searched for wounded on the ground in front of the enemy`s lines for four hours.Next day he took out one strecher bearer to the advanced trenches,and,under heavy fire carried an urgent case for 500 yards into safety,being wounded in the side by a shell splinter during the journey.The same night he took up a party of trusty volunteers,rescued three wounded men from a shell hole twenty five yards from the enemiy`s trench,buried the bodies of two officers and collected many id tags although fired on by bombs and machine guns.Altogether he saved the lives of some twenty badly wounded menbesides the ordinary cases which passed through his hands.
Noel Chavasse MB, V.C and Bar,Military Cross was killed whilst attending to wounded at the battle of Flanders August 4th 1917.

Every person that is sent to a War whether justified or not deserves the uttmost respect for there courage to do the tasks that civillians will never understand.Yes War is wrong but sometimes the ends justify the means.Iraq does not come close to conflicts of the past.

[edit on 1-10-2004 by weirdo]

[edit on 1-10-2004 by weirdo]



posted on Oct, 2 2004 @ 07:50 AM
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Went on to D-Day after that stunt!


He was also a British Army Boxing Champion and a total hell man,he enlisted at 15 (lying about his age) and hes still alive at 87,has a yacht that he still sails with his best freind-Hans, he was a radio operator onboard a Junkers Ju88 shot down over London,he stayed in England after the war and married an English women.I take it from your post that you think i perhaps made this info up and you find it hard to believe? Ive been inspired all my life by the exploits of others and many truthfull events are far more awe-inspiring than what i posted here-its not about war-right or wrong its about the men and women next to you that you give for-My grandfarther killed many germans and i Know that ways heavy on his heart,he will always be fighting that war somewhere deep down-people like him gave so,so much for all freedom loving people along with their familys that watched them go,there all heros,in all battles-i salute them all.



posted on Oct, 2 2004 @ 08:10 AM
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As for individual acts of Courage my Vote goes for Tom Custer, the younger brother of Col G.A. Custer of Little Big Horn fame. Almost forgotten by history Tom Custer is one of a very small number to recieve the Congressional Medal of Honour twice.


First Medal
Tom was to exceed Autie's expectations on two occasions during the next few days. At Namozine Church, on April 3, three regiments of enemy cavalry made a rearguard stand which elements of Custer's division had to dislodge. The Northerners charged in front and flank and the Confederates broke. In the middle of their line the color-bearer of the 2nd North Carolina lost his flag to a young man in the thick of the melee. It was Tom, discovering that a staff position could be far more exciting than it sounded, especially when one's commander was George Armstrong Custer! Autie wrote to Libbie the next day: "Tom in the most gallant manner led the charge of the Second Brigade... [He] is always in the advance." For the second time that month Tom had his horse shot from under him (the first was at Five Forks). As well as the color-bearer and flag, he took a dozen prisoners, including two or three officers, and was to be awarded a Medal of Honor for his actions

Second Medal
Tom led the assault upon the enemy's breastworks, mounted, was first to leap his horse over the works on top of the enemy while they were pouring a volley of musketry into our ranks. Tom seized the rebel colors and demanded their surrender. The color-bearer shot him through face and neck... So close the muzzle Tom's face was spotted with burnt powder. He retained the colors with one hand, while with the other he drew his revolver and shot the rebel dead.

Often forgotten Tom Custer was prob one of the Bravest, and reckless, Troopers to fight for the Union during the Civil War. Custer ( George) once said "Do you want to know what I think of him? Tom should have been the General and I the Lieutenant."
Captain Tom Custer




[edit on 2-10-2004 by Janus]



posted on Oct, 2 2004 @ 09:09 AM
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Heh Romanus,would you mind telling me where you got your aviator picture from-very nice-?



posted on Oct, 2 2004 @ 09:16 AM
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I found it when i was surfing the net, if its your work ill happily change it.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 04:32 AM
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I found it when i was surfing the net, if its your work ill happily change it.


no dude,its not mine-i just liked it-just wondered if you could remember where it came from roughly?

Regards.



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 05:27 AM
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I Googled Templar Knightson the image tab at the top of Google mate



posted on Oct, 3 2004 @ 08:46 AM
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I like the Randy Schugart (sp?) and gary gordon in somolia in 1993



posted on Oct, 4 2004 @ 10:46 PM
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Fleischer, Carl G.
(1883-1942)

  • 1934 Commanding Officer 14th Regiment
  • 1939 - 1940 General Officer Commanding 6th Military District
  • 1940 General Officer Commanding 6th Division
  • 1940 General Officer Commander in Chief Northern Norway
  • 1940 - 1942 Chief Army High Command - Commander in Chief Norwegian Forces in Canada
  • 1942 Military Attaché to Washington
  • 1942 Suicide

    He was leading the attack against Narvik, Norway 1940 after the Germans had occupied the city. Narvik was an important strategic city b/c of the Iron-ore which was shipped from there. He managed to capture the city of Narvik, causing Hitlers first ever defeat in WWII. He was fighting with his troops. How many Generals does that nowadays? Unfortunately the allies eventually decided to give up Norway and moved their troops back home. Not a wise descision. Hitler was happy about that move and occupied Narvik once again.

    Unfortunately, Fleischer made some wrong "enemies" during this war also. Some people were jealous, I think. Powerful people in the norwegian government (the foreign minister was one of them) decided to push him around. Causing him ultimately to commit suicide in 1942. And they used their powers after the war to "rewrite history" (hiding the facts) and robbing him of the honor and glory he deserved. Somebody wrote a book about him, in hope of bringing some justice to his case. Somebody tried to threaten the author to give up writing this book. This "mafia" should not sleep well at night. The truth will be known. For scandinavian readers . It's about a history-forgery (lie) which should be exposed...

    Wikipedia: Carl Gustav Fleischer

    Norwegian general and the first allied general to win a major victory against the Germans in World War II.


    [edit on 2006/4/23 by Hellmutt]



  • posted on Oct, 5 2004 @ 09:25 AM
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    Originally posted by Shadowflux
    Food for thought, the story of the Spartans could be correlated to the Iraqi "insurgants" fighting us off. Valour is determined by the winner


    Ahem, you've got to be kidding right ?

    I didn't know the Spartans hid behind their own people while fighting. Did the Spartans kill their own people to make a point to their enemy ?



    posted on Oct, 5 2004 @ 10:04 AM
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    Old, but remembered where I come from.

    The Battle Of The Golden Spurs in Flanders anno 1302.
    Flemish cilvians,farmers and other normal people fight and overcome an army of knights and nobles.

    www.liebaart.org...

    www.trabel.com...

    www.deremilitari.org...

    [edit on 5-10-2004 by Calibre]



    posted on Oct, 5 2004 @ 10:27 AM
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    And anotherone. World War I

    I have been there. To the region I mean before anyone thinks Im a +100 year old guy typing this. The remains are still visible in the landscapes. There are quite a few impressive graveyards also. This hangs of course together with the battles around Ypres and Diksmuide, Paschendaele and other little towns. If you ever have the chance to visit Belgium, I can only recommend you to visit the region. There are few musea aswell as parts of the battlefield who are kept like it was then to visit. Graveyards (some of them are really impressive when you realise how many people died there)to visit and a lot more.

    I dont single out persons, but it is my believe that the soldiers who died for the good cause there are all heroes.

    And also at the German side there where probably heroes. Being Flemish and Belgian and having family killed in both great wars I do not keep any grudge against Germans. Most of them where told what to do and if not, they got shot. And family had troubles also. So it is not totally fair to only see them as evil. I am sure that they had good decent people who stood up for their friends, who tried to or did save lives also.


    www.firstworldwar.com...

    www.lib.byu.edu...

    [edit on 5-10-2004 by Calibre]





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