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Mega Tsunami The Hilina slump

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posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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It's not "if" but when large pieces of the Hawaiian Islands will slip into the ocean, the entire Pacific Rim will be smashed by the resulting tsunamis. In New South Wales, Australia, and the west coast of the United States there is geological evidence that parts of these coasts was scoured by a Hawaii generated tsunami over 100,000 years ago. The postulated wave started out about a 1/2 mile high in Hawaii.



Perspective view of the Big Island of Hawaii, looking northeast. The giant Alika landslide descended the western slope of the volcano Mauna Loa (ML). The northern lobe of the landslide, Alika 2, was about 120 cubic miles in volume (the 1980 Mt. St. Helen's landslide was less than one cubic mile). Sediments lying on top of the Alika 2 debris are 120,000 years old. credit: Gerard Fryer, SOEST/University of Hawaii


Geologists classify these slides as either "slumps" or "debris avalanches." These move just a few inches a year but are prone to much bigger movements. In Hawaii, both varieties of movement can involve massive blocks of real estate. In the huge Nu'uanu debris slide, stone blocks 6 miles across tumbled 30 miles out to sea. Both slumps and debris slides may create colossal tsunamis.




Worse waves are possible in very near future. A 4,760 cubic mile chunk of Hawaii is breaking away at the rate of 4 inches per year. This is the Hilina Slump, and it is the "the most rapidly moving tract of ground on Earth for its size." The Hilina Slump can and will move much faster. At 4:48 AM, November 29, 1975, a 37-mile-wide section suddenly dropped 11½ feet and slid seaward 26 feet. The result was a magnitude-7.2 quake and a 48-foot-high tsunami. This was a just speck of the slump. If the entire 4,760-cubic-mile block decided to break off, it would most likely create a magnitude-9 quake and a tsunami 1,000-feet high. All the coast-hugging cities of the Hawaiian Islands would be destroyed.



links
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posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by flyingfish
 


That is seriously scary; I know of another threat to the east Coast and/or the Atlantic Ocean from that one place in Africa.

www.armageddononline.org...


A volcano named Cumbre Vieja on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands of North Africa is where geologists suspect the next tsunami could begin. The reason for the concern... In 1949 during a volcanic eruption part of the island slid into the ocean before ending its descent. Should another large eruption of the Cumbre Vieja occur, the western side of the island is likely to collapse into the Atlantic.

Predicting the next eruption isn't a likely happening; geologists cannot say whether or not the next eruption will be the one to make the island shed its western shore. Until then, we have to watch and wait.

500 billion tons of rock creating five thousand trillion, (that's fifteen zeros), joules of kinetic energy, that is transferred and converted to a 600 to a thousand meter tall wave with excessive speeds. Ten minutes and it will have traveled 250 kilometers, all the while powered by the underwater landslide.





There will only be approximately 6 hours to evacuate that's if news of the landslide/tsunami spreads fast. I hope to heck they are monitoring this baby.

This is why i am glad i live in the Great Lakes Region away from the Ocean (Tsunami Prone Areas)
edit on 3-7-2011 by TheUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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And its number 5 on the most dangerous volcano decade list"


Avachinsky-Koryaksky, Kamchatka
Colima Volcano, Mexico
Mount Etna, Italy
Galeras Volcano, Colombia
Mauna Loa, Hawaii
Merapi Volcano, Indonesia
Niragongo Volcano, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Mount Rainier, Washington
Sakurajima Volcano, Japan
Santa Maria/Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala
Santorini Volcano, Greece
Taal Volcano, Philippines
Teide Volcano, Canary Islands, Spain
Ulawun Volcano, Papua New Guinea
Unzen Volcano, Japan
Vesuvius Volcano, Italy

USGS



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by flyingfish
 





Worse waves are possible in very near future.A 4,760 cubic mile chunk of Hawaii is breaking away at the rate of 4 inches per year. This is the Hilina Slump, and it is the "the most rapidly moving tract of ground on Earth for its size."The Hilina Slump can and will move much faster. At 4:48 AM, November 29, 1975, a 37-mile-wide section suddenly dropped 11½ feet and slid seaward 26 feet. The result was a magnitude-7.2 quake and a 48-foot-high tsunami. This was a just speck of the slump. If the entire 4,760-cubic-mile block decided to break off,
it would most likely create a magnitude-9

quake and a tsunami 1,000-feet high.

All the coast-hugging cities of the Hawaiian Islands would be destroyed.




OMG That is insane


I guess that's the one negative thing about living on Hawaii

it may be a paradise

But its one heck of a ticking time-bomb
edit on 3-7-2011 by TheUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:46 PM
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Nice finds. As mentioned, I seriously hope these locations are being monitored "to a T". There are probably a few more too right?


I did one quick french research and found this from the Canadian Federal Government and made sure to get the source in english.




A large earthquake hazard is recognized for southwest British Columbia and adjacent United States as reflected in the seismic zoning. However, a poorly know threat has been from great thrust earthquakes (M>8) on the Cascadia subduction zone extending from southern British Columbia to northern California. Although common for most other subduction zones, no such events have occurred on this coast in the 200 year historical period. A multidisciplinary program has now demonstrated that they have occurred in the past and that elastic strain is accumulating toward future fault rupture. Paleoseismic evidence includes abruptly submerged intertidal coastal marshes and turbidite layers from widespread deep sea landslides. The interval between past great earthquakes average about 500 years but have been irregular; the last was 300 years ago


source
edit on 3-7-2011 by spaceshrimp because: did some research



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by TheUniverse
 


Yes very scary.There are independent thinkers that support the theroy that these giant landslides occur during periods of higher than normal sea level, like we have now.
High sea levels tend to correspond with wetter climates. High rainfall causes high surface runoff and formation of canyons, and increases groundwater pressure that during dike intrusions may lead to flank failure.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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There are many such places through out the world like this and it is very dangerous. Erosion and streams is my main field of study withing geology and this is a very real threat.

There are some things that can be done to lessen the impact when they do eventually slide but it's very expensive and I doubt anything is being done here.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by spaceshrimp
 


There are several organizations monitoring the Hilina slump here is one.
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posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by flyingfish
 





Yes very scary.There are independent thinkers that support the theroy that these giant landslides occur during periods of higher than normal sea level, like we have now.


Yes and now we are Prone to the next big-ones we are still in the Inter-Glacial period where the Sea-Levels are at their Highest in the Earths Fluctuations between Inter-Glacial Periods and Ice Ages.

If anything this is grave news indeed any day we could have a ultra super mega tsunami wipe out hundreds of millions of people.


The Graph Shows Lower Ice Volume in our Inter-Glacial Period This Equates to higher Sea level subsequently.
edit on 3-7-2011 by TheUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by flyingfish
 


I was watching this when it said the next 10-20 thousand years. Although interesting I don't know of anyone that will around that long. Many of us are concerned about being here the next 10-20 months.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by TheUniverse
 


Well don't get carried away here. I doubt it will be that many deaths and high sea levels actually have very little impact on massive slides. It has more to do with what type of rock and how they are layerd and also how much ground water penetration is happening.

It still takes a very long time for the conditions to build up to cause this. Don't worry about sea levels when thinking about mountains sliding.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 


There are indeed, however this slump could devastate the entire U.S. pacific coast and no one seems to know about it.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by redrose123
 


That is from now to 10-20 thousand years.
Look at the data this could very well happen tomorrow.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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That is super scary. Between Hawaii causing a tsunami, "The Big One", and Yellowstone blowing up, the West coast of the U.S. looks to be fried in the future.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 





Well don't get carried away here. I doubt it will be that many deaths and high sea levels actually have very little impact on massive slides. It has more to do with what type of rock and how they are layerd and also how much ground water penetration is happening.


What about the 9.1 Earth-Quake in Japan!

Instead of a 30 metres Tsunami.

The waves from these Mega-Tsunamis could be starting out at up to 1000 feet 300+ metres.

www.armageddononline.org...


The amount of destruction caused by the inevitable Canary Island tsunami would dwarf these numbers by far, causing massive devastation to all shoreline cities, rivers and inland bodies of water connected to the ocean at the point of impact.

Becoming a lower wider wave (15-20 m high) by the time it made its way to America would surge up to 20 miles past the shoreline leaving a path of watery destruction in its wake. Major coastal cities would be in essence washed off the map, skyscrapers would be leveled and swept away, bridges would be torn away from their foundations, and human life would cease to exist by this destructive force in mere minute


And thats probably Low-ball Estimate 15-20m high by time it gets to NA(North America) and the Japan one was 30 Metres. I'm gonna say the Canary Islands Landslide/ Hawaii Land-slide could be even Worse.

It would seem logical since the displacement of so much water seems to be more prominent and prevalent with a landslide opposed to an Earth-quake.


edit on 3-7-2011 by TheUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 


As I stated independent thinkers believe there is a correlation.

SAN FRANCISCO -- Volcanic landslides that generate huge and devastating tsunamis tend to occur during historically warmer times on Earth, a new study suggests. Scientists don't know exactly why, but since the global climate is warming as you read this, the apparent connection was tossed out this week as a reason for scientists to be concerned about the threat now.

link



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by flyingfish
reply to post by kro32
 


As I stated independent thinkers believe there is a correlation.

SAN FRANCISCO -- Volcanic landslides that generate huge and devastating tsunamis tend to occur during historically warmer times on Earth, a new study suggests. Scientists don't know exactly why, but since the global climate is warming as you read this, the apparent connection was tossed out this week as a reason for scientists to be concerned about the threat now.

link


This article says exactly what my other post did. This link of yours has the scientists saying they have 0 proof that warmer weather or higher sea levels causes landslides and it's just a guess. However they do state, as I did, that seepage from water on land may help facilitate landslides however it does take a long time.

Warmer temperatures cause what we call "creep" which is the slow movement of the top soil down. Actual landslides are unlikely to be affected by weather changes or at least very very little.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 


His data makes sense the Earth is alot drier During the Ice-Ages. We are in an Inter-Glacial Period right now the Earth is Warmer and Wetter.

When the Soil and/or Ground is wetter its more prone to land-slides.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by TheUniverse
 


Yes you are correct but we are talking about rock not just the top soil sliding into the ocean, I believe that's the misconception people are having.

When large chunks of mountains or volcanoes slide into the ocean that is a Mega-tsunami that will be very very huge and there are many places around the world where this will happen eventually. Temperature or sea-level has little to no impact on the rock buried within the mountain.

It is more governed by how the rock is layered and how those layers are moving and that can be facilitated through ground seepage. Temperature may certainly affect top soil landslides however but that wasn't what I was referring too.

I was thinking about the real big one coming.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by kro32
 

Volcanic flank failures can be triggered by isostatic load adjustments, extensive erosion, gaseous pressures, violent phreatomagmatic eruptions, magmastatic pressures, gravitational collapse of magmatic chambers, dike and cryptodome intrusions as well as buildup of hydrothermal and supra hydrostatic pore fluid pressures. For a more complete discussion of triggering mechanisms of volcanic flank failures and gravitational flank collapses of island stratovolcanoes go tolink


edit on 3-7-2011 by flyingfish because: (no reason given)




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