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ADHD Statistics-causes, and effects on people's lives

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posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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I have 2 sons who were diagnosed at knidergarten/1st grade level. One is now 15, and will most likely suffer this disorder the rest of his life. My other son is 13 now, and may outgrow this, time will tell, but I do see improvement. I also have 2 girls, 11and 17, who are completely uneffected by this condition.
I have great reason to believe my younger brother has undiagnosed ADHD (now in his mid 30's), and has become "one of the statistics", sadly enough.

What ADHD is:

There are 3 types of ADHD:



There are three different categories of ADHD symptoms: inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity.
Inattention may not become apparent until a child enters the challenging environment of school. In adults, symptoms of inattention may manifest in work or in social situations.

A person with ADHD may have some or all of the following symptoms:

difficulty paying attention to details and tendency to make careless mistakes in school or other activities; producing work that is often messy and careless

easily distracted by irrelevant stimuli and frequently interrupting ongoing tasks to attend to trivial noises or events that are usually ignored by others

inability to sustain attention on tasks or activities

difficulty finishing schoolwork or paperwork or performing tasks that require concentration

frequent shifts from one uncompleted activity to another

procrastination disorganized work habits forgetfulness in daily activities (for example, missing appointments, forgetting to bring lunch)

failure to complete tasks such as homework or chores

frequent shifts in conversation, not listening to others, not keeping one's mind on conversations, and not following details or rules of activities in social situations
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Hyperactivity symptoms may be apparent in very young preschoolers and are nearly always present before the age of seven.

Symptoms include:
fidgeting, squirming when seated

getting up frequently to walk or run around running or climbing excessively when it's inappropriate (in teens this may appear as restlessness)

having difficulty playing quietly or engaging in quiet leisure activities

being always on the go

often talking excessively
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Impulsivity symptoms include:

impatience

difficulty delaying responses

blurting out answers before questions have been completed

difficulty awaiting one's turn

frequently interrupting or intruding on others to the point of causing problems in social or work settings

initiating conversations at inappropriate times

Impulsivity may lead to accidents such as knocking over objects or banging into people. Children with ADHD may also engage in potentially dangerous activities without considering the consequences.

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Things get worse as the damands of life increase:


There are several warning signs for ADHD that seem to get worse when demands at school or home increase. They include:

difficulties following instructions being unable to get organized, either at home or at school

fidgeting, especially with the hands and feet

talking too much

failing to finish projects, including chores and homework

not paying attention to and responding to details

getting poor grades in school being isolated from peers due to poor grades

secondary depression

www.webmd.com...

Other indicators:


Absolute Indicators of ADHD Neurology
Hyperactivity/Fidgetiness

Impulsivity (hyperactivity of the mind)

Unexplained inattention for "boring" activities

Primary nocturnal enuresis (bed-wetting) (48% of ADHD children have bed-wetting)

Episodic Explosiveness or Emotional Outbursts Strongly



Suggestive Indicators of ADHD Neurology

Waking slowly, not snapping awake, or being excessively grouchy (91% of ADHD cases)

Difficulty falling asleep at night (73%)

Unexplained irritability and rapid frustration

Unexplained negativity with or without depression

Verbal and/or spatial dyslexia (number, letter, and often word reversals)




Causes of ADHD?

It is a disorder of the brain's neurotransmitters. It is thought to be hereditary:


Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is caused by neurological rather than parental, social, or emotional causes. The cause of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been linked with the brain's chemical system, not it's structure. Thus, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a problem with brain chemistry - not brain damage or injury. The brain uses multiple chemical substances for operation, regulation, and communication. These chemicals, called "neurotransmitters", serve various functions in the brain. Three neurotransmitters have been linked to behavioral and emotional conditions: Dopamine, Serotonin, and Norepinephrine.

To pay proper attention, the brain must be adequately stimulated. To have proper control of our impulses, areas of the brain must be adequately controlled, repressed, or slowed down. In ADHD children, both systems of stimulation and repression are not working correctly. Some studies suggest that ADHD Children/Adults may have only ten to twenty-five percent of these two neurotransmitters found in the normal brain.

The impulse and behavior problems found in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) appear related to low levels of Dopamine in the brain.

Low levels of dopamine in the brain makes control of impulsive behavior almost impossible in the ADHD Child/Adult.

www.enotalone.com...


A VERY IMPORTANT part to understand what it is like for the ADHD person:


ADHD Children can exhibit a type of "hyperfocus" - intense concentration and single-minded focus when the activity is very interesting. This situation is most often found when ADHD Children play computer games. ADHD Children may have an amazing ability to hyperfocus on a computer game, one of the few things that moves fast enough to maintain their attention, unlike homework or routine chores. The hyperfocus found in ADHD Children is not a normal type of concentration or focus. Remembering the neurochemical aspects of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), hyperfocus requires the child to use the maximum attention and sustained concentration available. For parents and teachers, imagine trying to thread a needle, in low light, while sitting in a row boat in the ocean - the waves tossing and rolling all the time. The amount of concentration required to thread that needle makes us anxious, tense, and irritable - as if somebody were asking us questions while we were trying to thread that needle. This is way ADHD Johnny is so fidgety while trying to listen to your conversation or correction.



This is where the anger issues come into play:


To see it from the viewpoint of an ADHD Children -imaging trying to thread that needle for 30 minutes - then accidentally dropping the needle overboard. We'd have a few choice words or a bit of behavior problem as well.



ADHD Children are normally more aggressive, pushy, argumentative and talkative. When upset, as when confronted or in a heated discussion, their neurochemical system explodes in a burst of energy and aggression that is far in excess to the situation.



Parental issues that are experienced:



"I can't take it anymore!" Many parents arrive exhausted and overwhelmed by the constant stress involved in rearing ADHD Children. Single parents are particularly vulnerable to being gradually overwhelmed by the night and day coping required with ADHD Children. At times, parents may require treatment for stress, anxiety, or depressive reactions.

"They say he's all boy." As the infant grows and the symptoms of ADHD surface, parents begin to question the activity level of their child. As they compare their child with other children, they ask the opinions of relatives, friends, and others. Initially, parents are often told "He's just all boy". While many later stick to their original assessment as "all boy", you'll notice that nobody volunteers to baby-sit that "all boy" child.

"We're both crying by the time homework is over!" Homework time, labeled "homework hell" by some parents of ADHD children, is often so stressful that both child and parent are traumatized by the experience. If the child is receiving medication treatment, it is not unusual for the child to experience a period of "emotional instability" after school, as the school-time medication loses effectiveness. Homework during that time would involving crying, yelling, temper tantrums, frustration, etc.

"I must be a bad parent!" With ADHD Children, normal parental discipline and educational techniques don't work. Your neighbor offers "I did this (technique) and Billy hasn't repeated it since!" If your child has ADHD, use of that technique will have little or no effect. After trying various recommendations and reading parenting books, and still nothing works, parents become demoralized and feel they are at fault. In reality, a completely different approach is often needed for ADHD Children.

"Dealing with this is ruining our marriage!" Selecting a coping style to deal with ADHD Children often places parents at odds. One parent may come from the "All he needs is a good spanking" school of discipline (totally ineffective by the way) and the other desires to protect and understand the condition. Parents also argue over issues of medication, who does homework, and who deals with the school. Parents of ADHD Children often receive daily notes from teachers/principals - the record at my office being 37 discipline slips in a two week period. When the marriage is troubled in this manner, marital counseling and support is often needed.



Special parenting techniques are needed:



Signs of neurochemical excitement and outburst:
- Verbally loud, threatening, screaming, and talking excessively. In psychiatry, we use the term "pressured speech" to describe an aggressive, nonstop talking that is difficult to interrupt. The ADHD Children are almost totally unreasonable at this point.

- Physical aggression is strong. The neurochemical excitement becomes so strong at times that arms wave, feet stomp, objects are thrown, furniture/walls are hit, and the ADHD Child closes the physical range and may be intimidating or "in your face". Repeated cautions to calm down have no effect.

- Aggressive pursuit is often present. Recognizing that the situation is out of control, a parent typically offers a truce or attempts to disengage from the argument. The enraged ADHD Child suddenly can't break off their attack. If you walk away, they pursue you - following the parent through the house - still yelling, intimidating, and hitting the walls as they go.

- A major component of an Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is impulsivity, acting before thinking. ADHD Children have difficulty understanding consequences of their behavior, a component related to their problems understanding sequences. For this reason, enraged ADHD Children can be very dangerous and threaten or engage in high-risk behavior. They may destroy their favorite possessions, run out the door, strike at parents/teachers, curse, or threaten suicide. Amazingly, all those behaviors can surface simply because you've asked the ADHD Child to take out the garbage.

- Normal parenting techniques used for discipline or behavior are totally ineffective during these episodes. After the outburst is over and the ADHD Child does settle down, they are always remorseful and apologetic but the parents are traumatized.

Dealing with this excessive chemical reaction involves several components:

Address the ADHD Child in a calm manner. A loud voice will only increase their reaction to being interrupted or addressed.

Expect a verbal reaction. Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) children have "quick-draw mouth" - a verbal reaction and reflex anytime they are addressed or interrupted. I often encourage parents of ADHD children to become deaf for ninety seconds after asking the ADHD child a question. A simple comment such as "Jimmy, can you take your glass into the kitchen for me" produces an aggressive "Why!? Jennifer leaves her glass in here all the time! I'm not the only one with an empty glass around here! You never tell Dad to take his glass to the kitchen! He can do anything!" Expect an overreaction to your comments or requests.

Don't take the verbal reaction personally. Parental focus on the ADHD Child's overreaction will often prompt an emotional and behavioral explosion. When the comments include such gems as "I wish I didn't live here!" or "Jennifer is the favorite around here!", the natural tendency is to defend yourself or address the comments. Addressing their reaction only side-tracts the original discussion and raises their agitation.

Ignore the reaction and stay on your original topic. Often a comment such as "I'm sure there are times you don't like our family rules. If you want to talk about that, we can get together after you take your glass into the kitchen."

www.enotalone.com...


Statistics:


Russell Barkley, PhD has done extensive research on ADHD and ADD. Below please find a summary of some of his findings:
· Boys are most likely to be diagnosed ADHD.
· 75% of boys with ADD are also hyperactive while 60% of girls with ADD are also hyperactive.
· 40 % of children with ADHD have a parent with ADHD.
· 50% of children with ADHD also have trouble sleeping.
· Children with ADHD develop 30% slower than non ADHD children.
· 65 % of children with ADHD have discipline problems.
· 25% of children with ADHD have a serious learning disability.
· One half of ADHD children have poor listening comprehension.
· Parents of a child with ADHD are three times as likely to divorce.
· Teens with ADHD have four times as many car accidents and have seven times as many second accidents.

www.adhdchild.org...

Strong link to criminal behavior (which reflects the impulsive behavior). As the study shows,as much as 45% of prisoners have ADHD when only about 5-8% of the population has this disorder:


21-45% of criminals in prison have ADHD 15 clinical studies from peer reviewed journals show that I list below. Only 8% of children and 5% of adults have ADHD.





46% of female prisoners in Rhode Island met criteria for childhood ADHD.

Swedish study showed 40% of adult male longer-term prison inmates had ADHD.

The overall prevalence of ADHD in young male prisoners according to DSM-IV was 45%

Half of the male prisoners in Iceland (50%) were found on screening to have met criteria for ADHD in childhood

Studies show that at least 25% of prisoners in the United States have ADHD.

Diagnosable ADHD was found to occur in 25.5% of the adult male inmates, and major depression occurred in 25.5 % of the inmates.

A significant relationship between ADHD and depression was found to exist.


The impulsive behavior, poor judgement, and lack of thinking about effects of the behavior, and lack of behavior control:


Some reasons why people with ADHD commit crimes
It also appears that when individuals with ADHD commit violent crimes, these acts are more likely to be crimes of spontaneous and “reactive” aggression rather than carefully plotted out offenses. Such crimes are generally impulsive acts driven by a provocation or conflict that triggers an outburst.

Those with ADHD also have other triggers for crimes; adolescents and adults with untreated ADHD are often bored, sensation seeking, or simply impulsive, and this combination of attributes leads them to react with poor judgment. A desired item appears, they want it, so they take it

Children with ADHD are struggling with chronic symptoms of inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity and frequently do not realize this satisfaction. They can become alienated or friendless, and to avoid this outcome, they learn that outlandish behavior can earn them the respect of their peers. To them, negative attention is more desirable than no attention whatsoever, and befriending “bad kids” is preferable to having no friends.

adultaddstrengths.com...


Comorbid disorders that often exist alongside ADHD:


As a quick review, a comorbid condition is defined as another disorder which is also present when ADHD is there. It causes further morbidity, meaning more difficulties or suffering related to the second disorder.

When someone has ADHD it is very common that they would have a second disorder that affects their functioning. (Or maybe even a third disorder as well…)

Here are some of the common comorbid conditions, and how often they come:

Oppositional defiant disorder occurs in up to 60 percent of kids with ADD or ADHD. This is a behavior disorder characterized by testing limits and disobeying and defying which can be mild or quite severe and interfere with school, home etc.

Conduct disorder can be up to 25 percent of individuals with ADHD.This is a much more serious behavior disorder where individuals actually test limits to the point that they are crossing the line. These behaviors are severe enough that they would actually be considered criminal behavior. The symptoms include: stealing, setting fires, hurting animals, starting physical fights, bullying others etc.

Mood disorders occur in 20 to 30 percent of individuals with ADD or ADHD; depression much more common.

Bipolar disorder is less common but causes a lot of difficulty. A child with bipolar disorder and ADHD can be one of the most difficult children to treat in all of child psychiatry.

Anxiety disorders can be up to 30 percent; that can be Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, etc.

Learning disabilities can occur in 40 percent of people with ADHD or higher. It’s very important to realize that these are separate disorders. The ADHD does not cause the learning disability and the learning disability does not cause the ADHD. So if somebody receives good treatment for their learning disability but still has ADHD there is still interference going on or vice versa if somebody receives good treatment for their ADHD but is not receiving educational help for the learning disability there are still difficulties going on.\

A small percentage of kids with ADHD also have Tourette’s (chronic vocal and motor tics) and a small percentage of kids with ADHD would have an autistic spectrum disorder or PDD (pervasive developmental disorder). We’ll cover that in more detail in another article. So the answer to the question is ‘yes I do look for comorbid conditions such as learning disability and Tourette’s that often accompany ADHD and in fact it’s very important to look for the comorbidity’.

www.addadhdblog.com...

Is food partially the culprit?


Here's a list of food preservatives and colorings that could aggravate attention problems, although none of them (with the exception of Yellow No. 5) have been studied alone in humans.
Blue No. 1
Also known as: Brilliant blue
What it is: A food coloring
Blue No. 2
Also known as: Indigotine
What it is: A food coloring
Green No. 3
What it is: A food coloring, though rarely used these days Orange B What it is: A food coloring, but no longer used
Red No. 3
Also known as: Carmoisine
What it is: A food coloring found in only a few types of food products
Red No. 40
Also known as: Allura red
What it is: A food coloring and the most widely used food dye in the U.S., trumping both Yellow No. 5 and Yellow No. 6
Yellow No. 5
Also known as: Tartrazine
What it is: Yellow No. 5 is the only food dye that has been tested alone and not simply as part of a mix. Those studies did link it to hyperactivity. It is the second most commonly used dye in the U.S.
Yellow No. 6
Also known as: Sunset yellow
What it is: The third most widely used food dye in the U.S.
Sodium benzoate
What it is: A food preservative

www.cnn.com...




Refined Sugars: Too much sugar adversely effects the functioning of our physical and mental abilities.

Preservatives: The FDA estimates there are over 3,000 additives and preservatives. These are put into food to give them a longer shelf life. They also add for convenient meals. Common antimicrobial preservatives include calcium propionate, sodium nitrate, sulfites (sulfur dioxide,sodium bisulfite, potassium hydrogen sulfite, etc.) and disodium EDTA. Antioxidants include BHA and BHT. Other preservatives include ethanoland methylchloroisothiazolinone. FDA standards do not currently require fruit and vegetable product labels to reflect the type of chemical preservative(s) used on the produce

Hydrogenated Oils: Oils have been hydrogenated for decades in order to prolong their shelf life and make the oils more “stable”. Hydrogenated oil is an oil in which the essential fatty acids have been converted to a different form chemically, which has several effects. It also has a higher melting point, and is often used in frying and pastries for this reason. When hydrogenated, the chemical structure of the oil is changed, which scientists in the 1990s began to realize could result in negative health effects. Consumption of hydrogenated oil has been linked with diabetes, coronary disease, and obesity in a wide number of scientific studies.

thebigpproject.com...


So anyway, AHDH is challenging to say the least. Both for parents and child or the child that carried ADHD into adulthood.

I thought I'd share my research and knowledge of the subject. It's a tough road, and those that have been down it know.


I almost forgot- Brainscans showing brain function is different in those with ADHD:






pn.psychiatryonline.org...




posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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Thank you for the informative read. I am 24 and was recently diagnosed with ADHD. I had never even thought about it and neither had my parents when I was growing up. I exhibited most of the symptoms. I've only been on my medicine for like a month but it has done more for me than I could have ever imagined!



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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I don't believe that kids are ADHD, I think some kids are just hyperactive. And parents, just use it as an excuse to put their kids on drugs, rather than letting them be kids and dealing with them straight up. They consume more sugar than most kids.

Now, my niece, she was born with a deformity of an underdeveloped brain. I would consider her ADHD because she is just uncontrollable. I think she is like 15 or 16 now and she still acts like she's 5 years old and has no understanding of the world and how it works.

Unless, the kids has no brain deformity than that kid does not have ADHD. Just MO.
edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Yup, that's all me...except for the 'H' part. Too damn lazy.


As an adult I can tell you that it is no picnic. When I was young, it was drug after drug and counselor after counselor.

Drugs turned me into a zombie and quieted down my brain. Didn't like that as I am a creative person. Counselors blamed it on parents, society etc. Didn't like that as it didn't make much sense to me at that young age.

So as I got older and started getting into trouble, it was always the parents fault. Why? They didn't encourage me to be a rebel. Quite the opposite.

So as I got older, I used the Zoloft approach. NO THANK YOU! Might as well kill my creative streak.

And then, I just accepted it for what it was...ADD. Learned to recognize the results of my actions. Taught myself to listen, stop, take a break and re-approach. Not easy!

Now here I am at 47. Still have to do a smack down on the ADD every once in awhile but when I realize what it is, I can take a step back. take a personal day, get some sun or whatever.

Maybe not what the Pharm guys want but I prefer my approach.

Good Thread...Thanks

SnF



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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alot of good information there thanks for postings.
I only found out that i had adhd at 19. At the beginning of my adult life and have found it so hard. Im not sure what im gonna do. its seems all to easy to just want to give up right now. I have no idea how people manage adult adhd.
Makes you wonder how no one could of notice when growing up. The amount kids with this problem and no school does anything about it.I've had to move alot so i've been to a few. i know looking back that quite a few kids who were trouble makers must of had adhd. A few of them are probably in jail right now. Shame really.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by tinker9917
 


I am glad to see you got this up and going...I have kept an eye open for it...awesome!


I need to do some reading above...but I wanted to say good work...looks great!

Very good...thank you for posting this...a lot of information and well done research. I can certainly say there is some surprising things that I would not have suspected that correlate with ADHD, and ADD.

I was somewhat surprised at the tie between criminal behavior later in a suffers life, and how many people in jail or prison that could be diagnosed with the disorder...I had to scratch my head a bit on that fact.

Anyway...good work...and thank you for sharing!
edit on 2-7-2011 by jerryznv because: ...post-reply edit...



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by angrymomma
 


What medication di they put you on, may i ask? My boys did best on concerta, after trying ritilin and strattera



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Thank you. My boys have been off meds for a year now.. My oldest, he is quite hard to deal with but he is a "vibrant" person again.He has intersts again.

My youngest, I think he's growing out of it.

Medication is not all bad, keeps the child in control
My oldest had violent outbursts, But I felt it kept him from being social and outgoing at the same time. He was like a zombie sometimes, never wanted to go out and have fun, do things normal kids do. He was a "loner". And that made me sad for him.
My younger boy is very social, his problem was/is impulsiveness. I feared his safety and those aroung him because he would just "not think" of the consequences of his actions.

Bottom Line: Medication helped the violent outbursts, and the impulsiveness. But it affected their creativity and
personality too.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by Bixxi3
 


I t is a shame, cause so many lives could be different if this was diagnosed and treated. With or without medication.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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Just curious? Why is it, that you want MEDICATION to solve your child's problems? I have a anxiety disorder, I have social disorders, I've had problems with education, and I've had problems with authority, doesn't make me ADHD or ADD.

One of these days, they have to grow up, and you as a parent, don't want to deal with it. Tell the truth.

Why can't parents, just admit that they don't want to be parents and deal with the ages of teenager years? Yeah, it's rough. I made my dad go through hell. I know. I put my dads job on the line. So, I do know. Right from wrong.

All kids do that.

It's a process of learning as you grow up.

At this rate rate, I might as well, be stated in all 3 above for the disorder. Uh.
edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by tinker9917
reply to post by jude11
 


Thank you. My boys have been off meds for a year now.. My oldest, he is quite hard to deal with but he is a "vibrant" person again.He has intersts again.

My youngest, I think he's growing out of it.

Medication is not all bad, keeps the child in control
My oldest had violent outbursts, But I felt it kept him from being social and outgoing at the same time. He was like a zombie sometimes, never wanted to go out and have fun, do things normal kids do. He was a "loner". And that made me sad for him.
My younger boy is very social, his problem was/is impulsiveness. I feared his safety and those aroung him because he would just "not think" of the consequences of his actions.

Bottom Line: Medication helped the violent outbursts, and the impulsiveness. But it affected their creativity and
personality too.



With ADD. being a loner was a normal part of my life. I needed to be a loner as not many people could understand my thought processes. I was of a higher IQ level than my peers. Being a loner should be ok for a parent to accept but they often see it as a failure on their part. Not so.

When I was forced to interact with others because it wasn't normal to be alone, I got in trouble. Spent time in Juvenile homes and eventually prison for a stint. Then I had my ADD epiphany at about 22 yrs of age. All better now! Lots of work tho.

I then went on to be involved in work that was far from alone. From Public Speaking, Motivational Seminar Speaker and Acting. No more loner.
But I still cherish it and revert back when I need a break.

Being alone meant that I could concentrate on what is most important. Above average thinking and creativity. Don't think of it as abnormal. Embrace it and just let him be a loner. We don't all have to fit into the box.

just a few pennies worth.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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Control the child, not the real problem. That's your problem.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 





Unless, the kids has no brain deformity than that kid does not have ADHD. Just MO.


I am just curious too...you have rather strong feelings on this...so if I might ask: Do you have professional training in these types of diagnosis? And have you participated in experiments that either disprove, or prove that there is not a disorder without the presence of a brain deformity?

If you are a medical, psychological, or neurological expert your data on such tests and experiments would prove to be very valuable to this thread...so are you a professional in a related field of study that directly studies the brain and disorders of the nature that is being discussed in this thread?

Please do share your expert evidence and how it was obtained...I patiently await your reply.

Thanks


edit on 2-7-2011 by jerryznv because: ...

edit on 2-7-2011 by jerryznv because: ...check...



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
reply to post by Manhater
 





Unless, the kids has no brain deformity than that kid does not have ADHD. Just MO.


I am just curious too...you have rather strong feelings on this...so if I might ask: Do you have professional training in these types of diagnosis? And have you participated in experiments that either disprove, or prove that there is not a disorder without the presence of a brain deformity?

If you are a medical, psychological, or neurological expert your data on such tests and experiments would prove to be very valuable to this thread...so are you a professional in a related field of study that directly studies the brain and disorders of the nature that is being discussed in this thread?

Please do share your expert evidence and how it was obtained...I patiently await your reply.

Thanks


edit on 2-7-2011 by jerryznv because: ...

edit on 2-7-2011 by jerryznv because: ...check...


Yes, I do have strong feelings about it. I know kids that have normal brains unlike half of a brain that my niece has. From the x-rays I've have seen, compared to an ADHD or ADD patient.

The parents of these kids, want to sit there and blame it on this, and blame it on that.

And yes, I have taken a neurological class to even grasp the understanding.

Even the kids with neurological problems, still communicate without an indifference, and do know the difference between right and wrong.

But, the kids who have an underdeveloped brains, do not know the difference.

But, these so-called kids that do have ADHD and ADD, do know the difference. I would strongly advise, not to let it fool you. It's a fool's game.

That's what the parents do not grasp.

The parents do not want to deal with it, they want to put them on drugs, it solves their problems and they don't have to deal with it.

You think back to the 70's when they didn't have Ritalin?

Kids made a mess, parents cleaned it up, and parents took responsibility.

They don't want to take responsibility now.

They want, answers to their problems.

That's all it is.

edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Just curious? Why is it, that you want MEDICATION to solve your child's problems? I have a anxiety disorder, I have social disorders, I've had problems with education, and I've had problems with authority, doesn't make me ADHD or ADD.

One of these days, they have to grow up, and you as a parent, don't want to deal with it. Tell the truth.

Why can't parents, just admit that they don't want to be parents and deal with the ages of teenager years? Yeah, it's rough. I made my dad go through hell. I know. I put my dads job on the line. So, I do know. Right from wrong.

All kids do that.

It's a process of learning as you grow up.




At this rate rate, I might as well, be stated in all 3 above for the disorder. Uh.
edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



Medication was not first choice... it was either medication or... holes in the walls when he got mad or bruising me or the other three kids when he was upset.

It was just when he was "set offf", otherwise this child was an angel, a heart of gold.


My other boy, the "dare devil" would not have lived to see the age of 16 without it, or would've been in juvie.

Meds are not always the best choice, but sometimes the only choice. In my case, it was to protect myself and my other children from a child who could not yet control himself.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by tinker9917

Originally posted by Manhater
Just curious? Why is it, that you want MEDICATION to solve your child's problems? I have a anxiety disorder, I have social disorders, I've had problems with education, and I've had problems with authority, doesn't make me ADHD or ADD.

One of these days, they have to grow up, and you as a parent, don't want to deal with it. Tell the truth.

Why can't parents, just admit that they don't want to be parents and deal with the ages of teenager years? Yeah, it's rough. I made my dad go through hell. I know. I put my dads job on the line. So, I do know. Right from wrong.

All kids do that.

It's a process of learning as you grow up.




At this rate rate, I might as well, be stated in all 3 above for the disorder. Uh.
edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



Medication was not first choice... it was either medication or... holes in the walls when he got mad or bruising me or the other three kids when he was upset.

It was just when he was "set offf", otherwise this child was an angel, a heart of gold.


My other boy, the "dare devil" would not have lived to see the age of 16 without it, or would've been in juvie.

Meds are not always the best choice, but sometimes the only choice. In my case, it was to protect myself and my other children from a child who could not yet control himself.


How strict are you on them and why are they rebelling against you? You need to find the root cause. And, I highly doubt that ADHD is the root cause. Are you divorced? Is that why they are rebelling against you? Is it someone at school? (Peer pressure?).
edit on 2-7-2011 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I can relate to what you are saying... I know for a fact his IQ is higher than most, even though he struggles in school. It is the attention thing that is hindering him.

As for the "loner" thing, I encourage him to do activities, but he can't compete because, as alot of kids with severe ADHD, his fine motor skills are hindered. Hard for him to be coordinated, catch a ball, ride a scooter, etc,

I'm so glad you have overcome this though... it gives me hope for my oldest son, who has severe ADHD, that he will find his place in life that he belongs.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


You have failed to answer any of my questions...so here they are again:

Do you have professional training in these types of diagnosis?

Have you participated in experiments that either disprove, or prove that there is not a disorder without the presence of a brain deformity?

Are you a professional in a related field of study that directly studies the brain and disorders of the nature that is being discussed in this thread?



And yes, I have taken a neurological class to even grasp the understanding.


Please tell me this is not what you consider to be professional training in making diagnosis! Seeing as how you have mentioned it though...what class?



You think back to the 70's when they didn't have Ritalin?


In fairness...I will answer your question...yes I remember the days when they did not have Ritalin. I also can think back to the day when they did not have antibiotics, or insulin, or dilantin...the list could go on ad infinitum. The point is...science and technology has brought us to a new level in diagnosing and treating illness's...without which, you might not be here either...so why would I not think there would be advances in disorders like ADHD?

Why are you so insistent that it is not a real disorder? Do you have any data to back up this claim...or do you consider you personal experience with your niece to be sufficient scientific/medical evidence?



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Manhater
 


Did you happen to look at the picture of the "normal" brain and the "ADHD" brain function? It is proof, the brains are functioning differently.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
reply to post by Manhater
 


You have failed to answer any of my questions...so here they are again:

Do you have professional training in these types of diagnosis?

Have you participated in experiments that either disprove, or prove that there is not a disorder without the presence of a brain deformity?

Are you a professional in a related field of study that directly studies the brain and disorders of the nature that is being discussed in this thread?



And yes, I have taken a neurological class to even grasp the understanding.


Please tell me this is not what you consider to be professional training in making diagnosis! Seeing as how you have mentioned it though...what class?



You think back to the 70's when they didn't have Ritalin?


In fairness...I will answer your question...yes I remember the days when they did not have Ritalin. I also can think back to the day when they did not have antibiotics, or insulin, or dilantin...the list could go on ad infinitum. The point is...science and technology has brought us to a new level in diagnosing and treating illness's...without which, you might not be here either...so why would I not think there would be advances in disorders like ADHD?

Why are you so insistent that it is not a real disorder? Do you have any data to back up this claim...or do you consider you personal experience with your niece to be sufficient scientific/medical evidence?


You obviously didn't read, which means you are side tracked and have ADHD. Pretty much, I said, NO, but took the class on it.



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