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Electric Cars Do Exist, They're Just Not Mainstream Yet

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posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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I was watching an episode of 'The Universe' today, and they were talking about the energy that the sun releases and how it can be harnessed. One thing they went over was a fully electric car from 'Tesla Motors', the Tesla Roadster:

The car works by converting electromagnetic energy from an ordinary light socket into mechanical energy, which is used to charge up the cars battery.

The battery is located in the rear of the car, and once it gets charged up it's used to run the cars electric motor. There's a computer inside of the car which takes the energy from the battery, and uses it to turn the single electric motor which powers the car.
(The battery is the thing at the very front of the trunk with some dots on it, and the motor is the block in front of it)

Another idea presented in that episode was putting solar panels on top of our homes. Not only would everything inside of our homes be powered by energy from the sun, but we could also charge our Tesla cars there, and it would literally be running off of sunlight.


And this Tesla car is no weak hybrid that accelerates like a tortoise, it hauls ass. It can do 0-60 in 3.9 seconds, faster than most production gasoline cars on the road today, plus it looks awesome too. It accelerates faster than gas vehicles because electric motors provide full torque immediately, while gas engines have to rev up.

While that chart says the fuel source is "natural gas", I can't find any mention of natural gas needed to power the car on their website.

On the side of the website, it says Simon Hackett made it 313 miles off of 1 charge! Compare that to the MPG that your car gets and you'll probably soil yourself.

Petroleum will eventually run out; the sun will provide us with limitless energy for billions of years, and here on Earth we only absorb a tiny, unimaginable fraction of all of the energy put out by the Sun. Why our government have not been pursuing free-energy for decades is beyond me.

One downside to this car is that it cost $109,000 as of right now, but once society shifts to a more solar energy based one rather than petroleum based, hopefully solar panels and electric cars will be the norm, and the prices will drop dramatically.




posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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The british show "Top gear"
tested the tesla roadster and
at full speed it lost battery power
after 10 min.!!!

Then it needed an 8 HOUR recharge....

Might as well have a horse and buggy.


edit on 1-7-2011 by hillynilly because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by hillynilly
 


I'm sure that as technology advances over time, so will the efficiency of electric vehicles. It's still cool that you can plug a car into a wall socket and drive to work, and if they had sockets at parking spaces you could charge your car while you work. Then maybe we could cover the entire thing in solar panels, giving it a carbon-fiber type of look, and you would have one efficient car.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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Never mind the problem with disposing of Lithium Batteries.
ONE Company is going to get all the business for disposal right now. Not that I want that crap spread out Ya understand.


Let's see where the campaign contributions flow shall we?
www.scientificamerican.com...

I'll check into it.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 06:05 PM
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I made a solar powered go cart in high school as a science project. It had a dune buggy type construction with an aluminum frame, 4 batteries wired in parallel, 3 panels on the roof, and a regulator powering a reversible dc motor. The accelerator pedal was connected to a potentiometer. The pedal could be pushed with the balls of your feet for forward, and by the heel for reverse. If I could built that at 16, they can build solar powered cars now. Now, in the interest of full disclosure, the panels did not/could not run the motor. The batteries did that. The panels charged the batteries.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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what isn't cool is that your electric bill would be $15,000 a month, and it's not like when you run out of gas in the middle of a road trip, you just hike to the gas station and fill a jerry can.

you'd have to run an extension cord miles long to a socket.

but one solution would be to space plugs along every public utility pole across america. if you want to be rich in the future, develop these plugs as a pay meter, where people just swipe their credit or debit cards, plug in and charge.

don't hold your breath, theres enough oil to last hundreds of years.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 06:25 PM
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I wouldn't mind driving around in one of those but it's too expensive and it's history...

autos.yahoo.com...



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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if you could merge wirless chargers and electric cars then you'd be onto something



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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The oil's the bugger. Just think about it, 1837 and electric powered vehicles.

www.szott.com...

So it's taken another 170 years plus to get to our current...pardon the pun, fledgling stage for electric vehicles.

In all that time noone has come to grips with the problem of the battery, until we are at a stage where half the world is contaminated from an oily waste. It's a no-brainer.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:15 PM
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Originally posted by hillynilly
The british show "Top gear"
tested the tesla roadster and
at full speed it lost battery power
after 10 min.!!!
Yeah but aren't they a bunch of "leadfoots"?

I'll bet if my grandmother drove it, it would have lasted at least 11 or 12 minutes!


I've seen some pretty exciting claims about new highly efficient and cheap solar panels, so let's hope those get commercialized and work!

The only thing that's still lacking is what you highlighted. Battery technology still sucks, relatively speaking. We need some breakthroughs there like we've had with solar panels.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 





While that chart says the fuel source is "natural gas", I can't find any mention of natural gas needed to power the car on their website.


I think that is likely because natural gas (our number two source of electricity) is easier to calculate and it's name "natural gas" sounds good. You will get x amount of electricity per Btu of natural gas. It could just as easily have said coal, and would have been more honest in my opinion. We generate twice as much of our electricity from coal as we do from natural gas.

I guess it's just marketing, it sounds a little less "green" and "sexy" talking about your new coal (our number one source of electricity) powered car. After Fukushima, nuclear (our number three source of electricity) doesn't seem so environmentally friendly either.

I would like an electric vehicle, but the fuel source is the big issue. It would take quite an array of solar panels to charge an electric vehicle so that pretty much brings us back to the grid for now. That means coal, natural gas & nuclear in that order, with less than 1/4 of our electricity coming from other sources (including oil, hydro & renewables).

Electric Power Monthly



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by hillynilly
The british show "Top gear"
tested the tesla roadster and
at full speed it lost battery power
after 10 min.!!!
Yeah but aren't they a bunch of "leadfoots"?

I'll bet if my grandmother drove it, it would have lasted at least 11 or 12 minutes!


I've seen some pretty exciting claims about new highly efficient and cheap solar panels, so let's hope those get commercialized and work!

The only thing that's still lacking is what you highlighted. Battery technology still sucks, relatively speaking. We need some breakthroughs there like we've had with solar panels.


That's the whole point of top gear, it's to with doing away with nonsensical claims, in a nonsensical manner...sort of.
Things like the Tesla cars can work only in the framework of our economic system which is based on oil, but if there is such a thing as free energy/.s



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by randomname
 

what isn't cool is that your electric bill would be $15,000 a month, and it's not like when you run out of gas in the middle of a road trip, you just hike to the gas station and fill a jerry can.
I don't know if your electric bill would be all that much more, or do you think it sucks up a lot more than a TV or microwave? I'm not sure, but if there were solar panels on the roof of your house your electric bill would be $0 a month, so you could charge your car all you wanted.


don't hold your breath, theres enough oil to last hundreds of years.
It's not that I'm worried about us running out of oil, I just think it's insane that we have to pay for energy when we can get it for free at our current level of technology.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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Here my problem with electric cars today...

10 years ago, the average middle-class American was no where near being able to have a fully electric car - well because the technology wasn't there yet. Sure we had concepts and dreams - butthat was all it was: a dream.

Now, here in 2011, the technology has progressed rapidly, our knowledge of fuels has expanded, and our concepts evolved. But how much closer is the middle-class American to owning one. Only a small number of 100% electric cars are on the market. The orange Tesla Roadster Sport pictured in the OP rings out about $120,000, with only 11 sale stores Nationwide.

So are we anywhere closer to reducing our dependency on gasoline? Or is it still just a dream? Show me an electric car that 40% of Americans can buy and I'll believe we've advanced.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by Plan2exist18
 

The orange Tesla Roadster Sport pictured in the OP rings out about $120,000, with only 11 sale stores Nationwide.

So are we anywhere closer to reducing our dependency on gasoline? Or is it still just a dream? Show me an electric car that 40% of Americans can buy and I'll believe we've advanced.
I think the reason that only 11 people bought them nationwide is the price. Once electric cars become more common, they'll eventually get cheaper and more people will buy them. I've heard about the Chevy Volt which is similiar to this, I'm pretty sure you can charge it in an outlet too actually. It'll take time though but I think in 20-30 years a good amount of Americans will drive electric cars, maybe 10-20% in 30 years, but I could be overestimating people.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


And where do you propose to take all the lithium from for all the cars? And as another poster mentioned, would it be a good thing for everyone to have electric cars? As of right now, it would just mean more coal being fired, more nuclear material being processed, and more "natural" gas being burned.

As of right now, electric cars are luxuries, not solutions.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 

And where do you propose to take all the lithium from for all the cars? And as another poster mentioned, would it be a good thing for everyone to have electric cars? As of right now, it would just mean more coal being fired, more nuclear material being processed, and more "natural" gas being burned.

Good question, I don't have an answer but I'm sure the top scientific minds who develop the electric cars will have a method of disposing of the lithium. If not...then the earth is going to be that much more polluted.



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 12:39 AM
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Here’s an electric bus.

Right now, electric cars are impractical toys for rich people. So is this bus – an impractical toy for a country with more money than it can ever spend.

Things may change in the future, but I doubt it. As for the long-term history of human transportation, I predict the return of the horse and a rise in leather prices on the commodity futures market.




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