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Georgia Home Completely Explodes - No Fire Damage Whatsoever

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posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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Something about this seems like a cover-up. How could the people in that house all have lived? The compression wave of the blast should have killed them - the blast was heard up to 12 miles away!!!

Plus, look at the photos - that was a violent event, the house is crushed, but the debris doesn't go very far from the house. If it were a "perfect" mixture explosion (highly efficient), meaning no energy was converted to fire, then we would expect that the house be blasted outward and away further.

This looks like it was crushed.

UPDATE: One of the people was actually blown OUT of the house!!! And lived to walk away from underneath a wall that was on top of him. That's at about 1:30 in the video.


edit on 1-7-2011 by Cryptonomicon because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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could be a mix of chemicals?
are charging batteries?
when you charge a battery you get gas.
oxygen and hydrogen.
small spark an Big boom!
and you dont get a big fire ball.
I filled a bin bag and lit it....



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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Like I said lizard people or N.Georgia meth lab.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


I noticed the tank too.... but I also spotted just behind them what look to be large air purifiers or fans lends credit to the possibility of a meth lab. Maybe.....

Interesting fact Anhydrous Ammonia is stored in propane style tanks and use to manufacture MethWarning About Recycled Propane Tanks Contaminated with Anhydrous Ammonia


edit on 1-7-2011 by ParanoidAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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It appears this house is in a very remote location, so it likely does not have natural gas service. They probably do have a propane tank for cooking and possibly for heating. Propane has no scent at all, so if the propane began leaking into the house then no one in the house would even know it. Most residential propane cylinders are 250 gallons. If much of that leaked into the house, then it could have turned the house into a ticking bomb. Any ignition could have lit it off such as someone striking a match, or someone hitting the ignitor on a stove, or even an ignitor on a furnace could have done it. If this is what happened, it's also possible that the resulting explosion could have done the damage shown in the pics while also burning up most of the accumulated gas, thus no fire. The reason most natural gas explosions result in a fire is because the gas line is ruptured, so it feeds a constant supply of new gas in, which keeps the fire burning. If this was a propane explosion and the entire tank emptied into the house, there would be no additional raw fuel to keep a fire going. A flash explosion will typically not ignite wood and drywall because it burns off too fast. Most building materials need to be subjected to heat for a pretty good period of time before they ignite, just a second or two wouldn't to it. I do wood carving and use a torch to burn the wood to raise the grain, you'd be amazed at how long you can hold a torch to wood without setting it on fire.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by SavedOne
It appears this house is in a very remote location, so it likely does not have natural gas service. They probably do have a propane tank for cooking and possibly for heating. Propane has no scent at all, so if the propane began leaking into the house then no one in the house would even know it. Most residential propane cylinders are 250 gallons. If much of that leaked into the house, then it could have turned the house into a ticking bomb. Any ignition could have lit it off such as someone striking a match, or someone hitting the ignitor on a stove, or even an ignitor on a furnace could have done it. If this is what happened, it's also possible that the resulting explosion could have done the damage shown in the pics while also burning up most of the accumulated gas, thus no fire. The reason most natural gas explosions result in a fire is because the gas line is ruptured, so it feeds a constant supply of new gas in, which keeps the fire burning. If this was a propane explosion and the entire tank emptied into the house, there would be no additional raw fuel to keep a fire going. A flash explosion will typically not ignite wood and drywall because it burns off too fast. Most building materials need to be subjected to heat for a pretty good period of time before they ignite, just a second or two wouldn't to it. I do wood carving and use a torch to burn the wood to raise the grain, you'd be amazed at how long you can hold a torch to wood without setting it on fire.



I understand your point. All I can say is that propane definitely has a smell..



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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If there was a high enough concentration of any type of gas to cause that type of explosion, wouldn't the people in the home have asphyxiated long before the explosion took place?



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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Is it possible that the explosion cut off the gas leak?

I have never experimented with the potato gun but using the same science and making a Tennis Ball Cannon I have never seen any fire damage to the HIGHLY Flammable Yellow Fibers even after repeated use.

I Tried To Come Up With A Burrito Night Joke But The Devastation & Injuries Point More Towards Souvlaki.

t



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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I'm thinking gas explosion too. I've seen pool heaters build up gas inside and then blow the door off with enormous force but never do I see flame because the gas burns up as it ignites. This could have been a leak from piping run under the floor of the house that got ignited somehow. It could have finally made it to the pilot light of the water heater or something.
edit on 1-7-2011 by TheLieWeLive because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 12:04 AM
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Originally posted by rstregooski
I understand your point. All I can say is that propane definitely has a smell..


You are correct, technically propane doesn't have a scent but they add sulfur to it so that it will smell (like rotten eggs) as a safety precaution. They do the same thing to natural gas. I was thinking that I read that they don't do it to propane and thus it's more dangerous because you can't smell it, but I just checked and apparently they do add it to propane too. We used to have a cabin with a propane heater and I was always a little concerned about leaving it on when we slept for fear that the flame would go out and we'd suffocate. I'd usually leave a window cracked open just in case, but that made it that much harder to warm the place.
edit on 2-7-2011 by SavedOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2011 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by ParanoidAmerican
 





I noticed the tank too.... but I also spotted just behind them what look to be large air purifiers or fans lends credit to the possibility of a meth lab. Maybe.....


I have yet to see a meth lab explosion that wasn't accompanied by a fire, but I'm no expert on explosions either.




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