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Georgia Home Completely Explodes - No Fire Damage Whatsoever

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posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:21 AM
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I decided to post this as it has become beyond bizarre to me at the moment..



BUFORD, Ga. - Hall County authorities say three people were injured after a home on Lake Lanier exploded early Friday morning.

The explosion tore apart the home on Blackberry Lane near McEver Road in Buford. The force of the explosion appears to have scattered debris into Lake Lanier.

Kimbrell says there was no fire. The injuries to the victims were caused by the explosion and by being trapped.

Link To Story...

This is near my own stomping ground, and I've never heard of anything like this happening before.




More Photos Here...


Now the most bizarre part to me is this:


A caller to FOX 5 says she felt the blast 12 miles away.



If it was a gas leak, how could there be no apparent fire damage present, and how in the hell could this be heard 12 miles away?


Your thoughts?
Good day...
edit on 1-7-2011 by rstregooski because: content




posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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There doenst need to be signs of fire damage for a gas explosion.

Ever make a potato cannon?

Fire one off and there are no signs of fire damage on the pvc or the potato despite there having been a violent explosion.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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This looks weird indeed, must have been quite a blast looking at those pictures.

Could it be an exploding boiler?

Seen the amount of damage they can do at Mythbusters, and they don't cause fire damage either because it's just pressure and water.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by rstregooski
 

Just from looking at these pictures, it appears to have been a pretty nice house, that was taken care of. Due to that, I have no reason to believe this is a factor, but living in Redneckville, U.S.A. causes me to wonder if there is any possibility that this was a meth-related explosion. As far as I know, anything related to the manufacturing of meth, would cause a burning explosion. On the other hand, I thought that all explosions would be burning.

In other words, that's just freakin' strange.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:31 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
There doenst need to be signs of fire damage for a gas explosion.

Ever make a potato cannon?

Fire one off and there are no signs of fire damage on the pvc or the potato despite there having been a violent explosion.


Well yea, but doesn't a spud gun react from a fuel/air mixture, like hairspray or something? The craziest part to me was that it was heard 12 miles away. This part of the state is the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, so elevations vary quite a bit..



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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reply to post by rstregooski
 


If it was a gas leak the house would have been one giant fuel-air mixture just like the chamber at the back of a potato gun.

Too much gas in the air will get you fire, too little and you wont get anything much but a flame at the fuel source, just the right amount and you get a violent explosive force that eats itself very efficiently.

Fire in an explosion is a sign of inefficient combustion. Wasted energy. Perfect combustion is clean.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:38 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
There doenst need to be signs of fire damage for a gas explosion.
Ever make a potato cannon?
Fire one off and there are no signs of fire damage on the pvc or the potato despite there having been a violent explosion.
But a potato gun, is not capable of destroying half of a nice-sized house. How big of a pressurized tank would it take to cause this? Could that have been caused from an outdoor propane tank that exploded from pressure alone? Isn't this↓↓ a propane tank?


 

ETA-

Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
If it was a gas leak the house would have been one giant fuel-air mixture just like the chamber at the back of a potato gun.
So you're saying that the house itself, if it was well sealed around the windows and doors, could have acted as a sort of tank. As the gas leak continued, pressure just continued to build inside the house, until it could not withstand it anymore?
edit on 7/1/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:43 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
There doenst need to be signs of fire damage for a gas explosion.

Ever make a potato cannon?

Fire one off and there are no signs of fire damage on the pvc or the potato despite there having been a violent explosion.


I disagree, i have had many a potato gun, and a lot of the ones i have would fire a flaming potato at whatever i'm pointing at. Guess it can depend on the type of gas.



The gas still needs something to make it go boom. Still needs a flame. So it could have filled with gas, but unless something sparked (electical wire?) or someone lit a match, then it should have just continued to leak..
I'm not a gas expert though, don't quote me.
edit on 1/7/11 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by Grey Magic
 


There's little chance that a single home residential boiler explosion could bring down the entire house. At most take out a room or two. Besides not many new houses have boilers anyway. Maybe it had something to do with one of those geothermal heat pumps some people are now getting. I don't know much about them...can anyone expand on this theory?


edit on 7/1/2011 by RedParrotHead because: typo



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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I guess I'm just amazed that everyone survived, so far...



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 

reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


Doesnt have to be air tight. Potato guns arent.

Have a gas grill? Open the gas with the lid closed. Wait 10 seconds then hit the ignition. There's nothing at all air tight about that and gas will leak but that lid flying up and the huge fireball is a fuel-air explosion nonetheless.

A spark or shock to ignite the combustion doesnt equate to smoldering flames post combustion.

Explosions put themselves out all the time.


edit on 1-7-2011 by thisguyrighthere because: no such word as "lib" lol



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by rstregooski
 

It looks like the ground below the house was severly affected by the explosion which would suggest that the explosion occurred below the house..



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 

ok, I must have misunderstood you. I am just trying to make sense of it. Obviously, I am not an explosives expert. Explosions can be cool to look at, but from a distance. That's about all I know about them.


I thought that you were saying that there was no actual fire, and the explosion occurred due to pressure. What you're actually saying is that the fire only lasted for a very brief amount of time, and was only burning gas in the air. The gas burnt up quick enough that nothing else within the house had enough time to start burning.

Am I getting closer?

That does lead me to one other question though:
If this is what happened, would that mean that the leak itself would have been stopped before the actual explosion? If the leak was still coming directly from the source, at the time of the explosion, then wouldn't the explosion have followed the leak, through the line, and back to the source?



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:35 AM
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Originally posted by mb2591
reply to post by rstregooski
 

It looks like the ground below the house was severly affected by the explosion which would suggest that the explosion occurred below the house..




I agree, certainly looks that way. The bottom looks like it blew out and the floors above it caved in. I'm really surprised anyone survived it. But it could have been worse, the whole thing could have been spread over a few miles.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:40 AM
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I'm in Atlanta and I'm off today. I'm tempted to drive up there and see if they're tryna be all "super secret" about anything...

P.S... HOLY CRAP!!



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


Yeah, that was what I was getting. Sorry if I wasnt clear on that.

If we assume there was a source for the leak, like a gas stove or a main leak beneath the building, there is actually a good chance that the explosion would not leave a burning flame at that source or cause the main line itself to explode further.

The pressure and force move the gasses, fuel and air, at such a rate that no flame could ignite the more dense fuel source.

Going back to my gas grill analogy, place a candle on the grate then close the lid gas it up and light it. The lid will still blow open and there will still be a fireball but the candle most likley will not be lit. The candle is too dense a fuel.

Ever work with a torch? The regulator alters the density of the fuel. Open it wide and you get a ridiculous yet useless flame, shut it down and you get a stable burn but no useful amount of heat.

Sort of like that.

Oh, the source likely has its own pressure as well which would further hinder an explosion setting it on fire. Like a lighter at the nozzle of a can of hair spray.


edit on 1-7-2011 by thisguyrighthere because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 

Thanks.

I think I get it now.
Still seems unusual, but it makes more sense.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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Woke me up and we're clear on the other side of the lake about 10 miles -- I blame lizard people.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by AzureSky

Originally posted by mb2591
reply to post by rstregooski
 

It looks like the ground below the house was severly affected by the explosion which would suggest that the explosion occurred below the house..




I agree, certainly looks that way. The bottom looks like it blew out and the floors above it caved in. I'm really surprised anyone survived it. But it could have been worse, the whole thing could have been spread over a few miles.


I got the exact address from a friend at the station.. Here is an aerial shot of the house before hand..





I would have expected material to travel further with that kind of destruction...
edit on 1-7-2011 by rstregooski because: content



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 
does that mean it could be a methane leak?Leaking out of the Earth?



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