Sometimes weather radar shows clouds moving in a direction other than they really are

page: 1
1

log in

join

posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:10 PM
link   
Over the years I have noticed that the National Weather Service radar will show storms and clouds moving in a direction other than they are really moving, when observing from the ground in that same area. Anybody know why they might show false radar images?




posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:13 PM
link   
reply to post by D_Mason
 

Prob most of it is upper and lower level storm systems.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:15 PM
link   
What we have here is a prime example of chemtrails. No seriously, it might be ground clutter or false returns.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:16 PM
link   
And we all wonder why weather(people) suck?

2nd line



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:26 PM
link   
Definitely not ground clutter or false returns, as a serious system just moved through the area. North to South. Clouds on the ground though, while there was still enough daylight to view them, didn't follow the direction of what was on the radar. I have noticed it before. Also lately I have noticed at times when severe weather moves through the area, a frame or two in the radar loop sequence suddenly becomes unavailable.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 09:31 PM
link   
The satellite pictures from above are taking images of the upper cloud region, this can be going in a different direction to the clouds you can see on the ground due to variations in pressure and temperature will will create airflow currents. Think turbulence on planes.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 12:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by michael1983l
The satellite pictures from above are taking images of the upper cloud region, this can be going in a different direction to the clouds you can see on the ground due to variations in pressure and temperature will will create airflow currents. Think turbulence on planes.
That's probably the correct answer. There is no "one" wind direction. The wind is often simultaneously blowing in different directions at different altitudes. The clouds move with the wind.

The lower clouds you see moving in a different direction are less likely to be the cause of your rain, that's why the weather radar focuses on the upper level clouds.

So the weather radar is usually showing an accurate picture. When you see something different, it's probably a different, lower layer that's not on the weather radar due to the lower altitude.



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 01:50 AM
link   

Originally posted by michael1983l
The satellite pictures from above are taking images of the upper cloud region, this can be going in a different direction to the clouds you can see on the ground due to variations in pressure and temperature will will create airflow currents. Think turbulence on planes.


That's what I think.

More than once, I have noticed lower clouds travelling in a different direction to other clouds at a higher altitude.





new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join