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Missouri River Levee Fails in Southwest Iowa

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posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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National Weather Service forecaster Josh Boustead says the breach was discovered after the river level downstream at Nebraska City dropped about 6 inches this morning to 27.6 feet. The breach occurred shortly before 4 a.m.

Source: www.woi-tv.com...

The area being effected has already been evacuated. will this releave rising water levels at the Nebraska power plant?




posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by IPILYA
 


It will help temporarily, but unless the water finds another route to the Gulf of Mexico, it won't help very much for very long. You get a brief dip (like the 6 inch drop this morning) and then it goes back up.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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i cant find any info on how all the dams are still holding up in the areas



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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A while back there was a very large, very detailed, and very good thread about the new map of the U.S. There were comparisons of NAVY maps and CAYCE precicion maps which looked quite the same. All of which had the rivers overflown and separating the country. We starting to look like that yet?



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by camaro68ss
i cant find any info on how all the dams are still holding up in the areas


I read this today and did not get a warm fuzzy feeling about his choice of words.
Everything is fine, but there are issues.

Source Omaha WH



“It's not to say there aren't issues at different places that we're monitoring closely. But in terms of the integrity of the dams, that absolutely is not a concern.”



edit on 30-6-2011 by Absum! because: source



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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www.kcrg.com...

PERCIVAL, Iowa (AP) — A Missouri River levee failed near Percival in southwest Iowa on Thursday morning, the National Weather Service said.

The breach, about a mile northwest of the town in Fremont County, had grown to about 200-yards-wide by 9 a.m., Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management spokesman John Benson said.

Local emergency officials told the weather service that the breach is expected to flood areas already evacuated between Interstate 29 and the river. Percival sits just east of the interstate.

National Weather Service forecaster Josh Boustead said the breach was discovered after the river level downstream at Nebraska City dropped about 6 inches to 27.6 feet. The breach occurred shortly before 4 a.m.

Residents in the area threatened by the breach were ordered to evacuate their homes last week, so authorities did not plan to issue a flash flood warning or evacuation order. Nevertheless, Fremont County officials planned to check the area for remaining residents.

The Iowa Department of Transportation extended the closure of Interstate 29 because of the breach near Percival. The interstate is now closed from exit 24 near Bartlett, Iowa, south to Rock Port, Mo.

Percival is about 16 miles northwest of Hamburg, which had to build a secondary levee earlier this month after earlier breaches in northwest Missouri.

Local emergency management officials have said the water flowing through the breached levee near Percival could eventually join with the floodwaters from failed levees south of Hamburg. That would increase the pressure on Hamburg's new levee, which has held so far.

The corps says it is releasing huge amounts of water into the river to deal with unexpectedly heavy spring rains and substantial Rocky Mountain snowpack. Officials predict the river will remain high at least into August.

The river is expected to rise more than 5 to 7 feet above flood stage in most of Nebraska and Iowa and as much as 10 feet over flood stage in parts of Missouri. Any significant rain could worsen the flooding especially if it falls in Nebraska, Iowa or Missouri, which are downstream of the dams.

That doesn't sound very promising.....



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by IPILYA
 


I don't think it will have any effect on the nebraska power plant because nebraska is up stream from iowa. I'm no geography buff, but I'm pretty sure about this. A levee breaking in iowa would alleviate down stream flooding as mentioned in the article, but I don't think upstream.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by imawlinn
 


Would it not create drag in the accelerated flow? Would that not pull from the flooded area near the plant?



posted on Jul, 1 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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All of these levee failures are just mind-blowing and yet, there's precious little coverage in the media around here.

Damn.




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