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Bugging out?.....Have you considered Time management?

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posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:04 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 

I know what you mean. When I first joined, I had already been a cadet for 4 years. I served 12 years and was selected for Intial Officer Training. Most of the would bes were straight from University, so in both cases I had somewhat of a heard start.

Still, if I had my time again, I would still join up. Okay, the bits of hot flying metal, loud bangs and nasty aircraft trying to make my day a pile of s**t was not so good, but the rest........................best days of my life.




posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:07 AM
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By time management, I had originally thought the OP was talking about how long it would take to bug out, how long to load your family into transportation, that sort of thing. (We live where we'd have about 30 minutes to bug out before a specific type of catastrophe could overwhelm us.)

Which we have actually practiced at home in the past month. Everyone (the older kids, anyway) had a different job to do. The kids loved it, and helped grade each other on how good of a job they did at taking only what we'd need. They actually were quite creative, bringing not only a pan to cook on, but also some oil to grease the skillet, etc.

When you said time management, that's what imagined; making every second count because you're betting all your money on a single hand.
edit on 30-6-2011 by dr_strangecraft because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:17 AM
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Originally posted by dr_strangecraft
reply to post by snowen20
 


Heh.

There is another thread I authored, where I remarked upon how difficult hunting can be, even with technology and leisure time. Several posters jumped on me and said that if it was difficult, then I didn't know what I was doing.

I had to laugh to myself. The last doe I hit at the tail-end of last season was the second of two that day. She went down next to heavy cover in an arroyo. It was 40 degrees and drizzling hard. I had walked onto the property from the road, and was about a mile in, carrying all my gear plus rain gear as well. I had seen the deer go down, but as I got down to the spot where she was, the blood trail was beginning to wash away, and the light was fading. I followed a path into a thicket that turned into a tunnel through the brush, small enough I could barely turn around. I was practically crawling after her, when her signs petered out. Then I found these huge hog prints and scat all over the trail. The boar that made those prints would have to be huge---like an upright piano in size. In the fading light, I pulled out my flashlight and discovered that it was dead, as I heard something move in the brush behind me....with a big bolt action scoped rifle, in a spot so tight I could barely turn myself around, much less draw down on whatever had begun following me.

I beat a hasty retreat, and dragged the first deer to a tree where I could gut her and hang her while I walked out to get the truck. By the time I got back, it was pouring rain. I never found that second deer. And there was no trace the next day. But honestly, I was a fool to go charging into a thicket at dusk. I was probably lucky to avoid confronting a hog, much less having some meat to take home to the Mrs.

Maybe I am a crappy hunter, but sometimes the situation is just larger than your ability to control it.



Well the problem is there are far to many people of ego ready to tear your methods apart. I have found the majority to be along the lines of armchair warriors and internet tough guys. Hunting is a dynamic situation, and you never know exactly what will happen. I would be weary doing anything alone where I might get into a situation I could not readily extract myself from. Going into a thicket when it is getting dark, may not have been the bet idea, but you survived to think about it in the future.

Your point is a good one though. This thread being about time and all. people who may be inexperience with hunting don't realize that skinning and gutting a large animal and thin cutting it up is not easy if you have never done it, much less a fast process. this doesn't include the possibility that your game may have fled after initial injury. Especially if you are bow hunting, where unlike a rifle there is no secondary trauma from impact.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:19 AM
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reply to post by dr_strangecraft
 


Actually your first post covered it succinctly.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 


The more I read your posts, the more I am inclined to think that your have done that nasty little course on Dartmoor, or better, in the Breacons. Am I right or wrong?



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:26 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 


I have never been to Europe.
Not yet.
I should mention, i really try not to talk too much about myself and experiences on ATS as people tend to review former posts and dissect everything you say. Most people don't believe you anyway, and even if you provide proof to them, they will deny it. Lose-lose situation, know what i mean?
edit on 30-6-2011 by snowen20 because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-6-2011 by snowen20 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 


I do indeed. Sorry, I thought you were a Brit. Therefore, you would have never been on these courses. But I have a shrewd guess at what colour your headgear was.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 


Lets just say if someone asks me why I am a soldier, I will say
"Because,I don't know how to be anything else ."
A problem that has been a curse and a blessing. But do you ever feel bored in your life after serving, life isn't the same after while.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:46 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 

It has been over 12 years since I retired. I miss it with a passion. However, service has taught me many valuable lessons, many of which are well suited to the topic of this thread. Now that I now you are a Sepo, I have an interesting site for you:

www.valhs.org...



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by TheLoneArcher
 


Great!
I have been fascinated with ancient warriors for years, and i used to collect battle ready exotic weapons but had to leave them behind when I moved to this country. Looks like something that would be fun to attend.
in fact now that I think of it, I may have seen some of these kind of guys at a fair once demonstrating their skills.
I remember my cousin at the time who was a self proclaimed tough guy got his butt handed to him by one of the demonstrators. We were only 16 at the time him being 17, I thought they were knights, but now I remember they wore viking attire.

LOL this is getting my blood up for a melee battle..
Just joking.
edit on 30-6-2011 by snowen20 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 02:59 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 


Well, if you need further links or indeed any literature, please drop me a U2U. I have to get back to work as we have an AOG.

Cheers.
edit on 30/6/2011 by TheLoneArcher because: Spelling



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by snowen20
 


Fair do's to you mate, most people wouldn't even know where to start surviving in any incident, most don't even know how to make a loaf of bread let alone start a fire without a lighter or matches.
I for one fall in the know a lot, ( theoretically ) same as the majority, read a few books , watched a few films blab on a lot about what I'd do and how I'd do it but haven't got the experience in actually DOING IT.

And to be honest my attempts at making bread lately are getting better, the first one was only good for throwing at the enemy.

To survive you have to practice what you preach until you feel comfortable with getting it right no matter how many attempts but should any event call for you to actually do it for real then you will have to make not only a physical adjustment but also a pshycological one to knowing that it isn't going to be as easy to go to the shops and buy what you need.

I have recently bought supplies , tent, blades etc in preperation taken classes on first aid, tried my hand a survival techniques and found them not only practical but also enjoyable, there is always going to be the safety net of I can go home knowing foods on the plate when I want, water is in the tap etc.

Most people are going to do just that, wait until the government gets to them or someone to come to their rescue.

This spring when the UK was covered in snow and nothing worked was a prime example, the travel infracture collapsed, the local shops were fleeced and people were begining to see how easy it was before but soon realised "Its going to get better and back to normal soon".
I as lucky then I had prepared 2 weeks before and told my family to stock up on enough food to last a month, buy bottled water by the crateload, essential 'luxuries' such as toilet paper were in very short supply if you couldn't get your car out the drive.

What if the next situation doesn't get better?
Will the government come to your rescue?They'll be looking after themselves first I'm afraid.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 11:07 AM
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And YOU VETS? Thank You!

There's ALWAYS a cold beer for you here in Tahoe.



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