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Meteorite fall in UK (Sussex) on cricket pitch during county match

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posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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However Jan Marszel, 51, and Richard Haynes, 52, were not witnessing a six, but an extremely rare meteor strike. The rock, a few inches long and believed to be up to 4.5 billion years old, broke in two when it hit the ground in front of them close to the pitch. The pair – both Sussex members – were sitting square of the wicket watching the England player Luke Wright bat with Monty Panesar when they spotted the black, five-inch rock hurtling towards them. Mr Marszel, an IT consultant, said: “We were sitting at the boundary edge when all of a sudden, out of a blue sky, we saw this small dark object hurtling towards us. “It landed five yards inside the boundary and split into two pieces.


Read the full article here



This is the first meteorite fall in UK since 1992.

I was wondering how it could have hit the chest of one of the guy without any damage? Shouldn't the meteorite be hot after it entry in Earth's atmosphere?

edit on 29-6-2011 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


that must've been fun to notice



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Amazing if true,but I would have thought it would be hot or warm at least.
Maybe it depends on the size-the lower atmosphere may be cold enough to cool down mini meteorites?
What a great thing to happen if true-hope some kid doesn't come forward saying"I threw a stone at the cricket pitch etc"



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Wow! That would of been fatal if it had hit someone for sure! You would think it would retain some heat from entry onto our atmosphere...

1992? Might sound stupid here but i thought meteorites crashed into our planet all the time??



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by iksose7
 

Yes, you're right, they fall all the time, but remains generally unknown, mostly because of their little size; they entirely burn into Earth's atmosphere, and for those who reach the ground, here's what is said about Arizona and New Mexico, for example:


A statistical study of the rates of meteorite falls suggests approximately 17 meteorites >0.1 kilograms (0.22 pounds) in size fall in Arizona, or an area of equal size, each year.
Two to three of these samples weigh >1 kilograms (2.2 pounds) and are about the size of your fist. A meteorite weighing >10 kilograms (22 pounds) falls every 2 to 3 years. Thus, from the turn of the century, approximately 240 meteorites >1 kilograms in size are believed to have fallen in Arizona.
Since Father Kino first arrived in the Tucson area (1687), approximately 790 meteorites >1 kilograms in size are believed to have fallen in Arizona. Of this large number of meteorites, only 32 have been recovered, and only 1 of these (the Holbrook meteorite) was observed to fall.
In comparison, 153 meteorites have been found in New Mexico, 3 of which were observed falling. Seventy of these samples were collected within Roosevelt County, where a special set of circumstances has preserved and concentrated a large number of meteorites. It should be clear from these numbers that most meteorites that fall are not found, and very few are actually observed hitting the ground. Thus, there are many meteorites in Arizona waiting for some curious soul to take notice.


source



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 01:25 AM
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Would've been awesome to witness!
What are the chances of that happening right in front of you?




posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by iksose7
1992? Might sound stupid here but i thought meteorites crashed into our planet all the time??


Yes they do, I've seen a few my self.
I think they mean one hasn't been found on the ground since 1992.
edit on 30/6/11 by Gazmeister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 07:13 AM
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I found one on the school field grass when I was in primary school. Didn't see it fall but it was still hot.
Science teacher loved me.



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust
I was wondering how it could have hit the chest of one of the guy without any damage? Shouldn't the meteorite be hot after it entry in Earth's atmosphere?

edit on 29-6-2011 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)


Meteorites of this size generally are fragments of a larger body that broke up in the atmosphere anywhere from about 30 to 60 miles up and if the 'explosion' didn't send a piece directly down ballistically, the fragment shouldn't be going much faster than terminal velocity, from gravity slowed by friction, that could be in the neighborhood of 200 mph when they hit the ground. (Explosion is in parens because what takes place is a very rapid succession of a series of breakups, similar to an explosion, depending on how fast the breaking apart occurs, and not to discount extra heat or energy produced either).

20 to 30 miles up anywhere around earth is very cold, (Mt. Everest is on the same latitude as Tampa Florida) it wouldn't take a one pound rock long to cool in the time it's falling and eventually slowing to around terminal velocity, especially if nobody heard a sonic boom.

The guy said a piece hit him in the chest after it hit the ground so that wouldn't be much different than any other ricocheted rock but it would probably hurt more than being hit by a golf ball on the fairway due to it's shape and harder surface than a comfortable golf ball surface.

I found it harder to understand the sport terminology than the event that occurred though.
edit on 30-6-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 08:28 AM
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That is an awesome story, let's see what it bring (information wise)



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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That's a pretty cool story, I too wonder if it was hot

I'm guessing most of the meteorites land in the ocean since it takes up most of the earth



posted on Jun, 30 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


I found it harder to understand the sport terminology than the event that occurred though.

'Square of the wicket’ means the gentlemen in question were sitting in line with the crease, so that the batsman would be facing them as he took strike, assuming of course, he was a right-hand bat.

The ‘boundary’ is the rope that demarcates the boundary.

Simple, really.


edit on 30/6/11 by Astyanax because: it was too complicated before.



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