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I am a Phlebotomist AKA I draw your blood for medical testing.

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posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:00 AM
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It might be a small thing for most, but for some it can be a very testing experience. I wish to provide answers to any questions you might like answered and can provide tips on how to best deal with the experience of having your blood drawn. A lot of simple things can be done by a person to help them through.

The first tip is ; Even when you are fasting, drink water, and not just sips. Drink 600ml 1 hour before a blood draw. If you are dehydrated your veins are harder to locate, the vasovagal(passing out) response can be triggered easier and really, it's just nice not to be parched without relief for 12 hours or so.

So...any questions?





posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:04 AM
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ughh I remember being in the hospital for a staph infection 10+ yrs ago... They would come in the middle of the night and draw blood... cant stand needles anymore because of it


Do they keep your DNA and/or blood sample on file afterwords?

What about testing for drugs/alcohol etc in your system for a normal checkup?


edit on 29-6-2011 by morder1 because: edited first question



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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I have a question.

How many RFID chips do you 'install' in a typical day?

edit on 29-6-2011 by TheComte because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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Originally posted by TheComte
I have a question.

How many RFID chips do you 'install' in a typical day?

edit on 29-6-2011 by TheComte because: (no reason given)


I'm just wondering... are you serious?



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by James1982

Originally posted by TheComte
I have a question.

How many RFID chips do you 'install' in a typical day?

edit on 29-6-2011 by TheComte because: (no reason given)


I'm just wondering... are you serious?


Maybe.

Maybe not.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:32 AM
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I have had blood drawn hundreds of times and
never had a problem until a needle broke in my
arm. And even then it doesn't bother me to
have blood drawn. I have other phobias - believe
me. Good tip for drinking water OP.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:36 AM
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I also studied phlebotomy and interned for a period of time at a local hospital working as a phlebotomist. It is incredibly taxing work, so I know where you're coming from. The worst part for me was having to draw from children.


While on the topic, I've noticed a great majority of the nurses/aids that draw blood do NOT care if they are inflicting pain and do things such as leave the tourniquet on too long, slap the patient's arm, etc; These practices lead to inaccurate test results and such.

Thanks for info, though! Keep on drawin'!



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by TheComte
 


Fair enough. It's hard to detect sarcasm on the internet as I'm sure you know.
I guess I should just wait for the OP's answer.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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Sorry everyone, I have been called into said work, I WILL answer any and all questions on the morrow


A good day to all



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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OP I believe Phlebotomy is a very noble professsion.
I was a phlebotomist the entire time I was going to school for nursing.
It was the best training I had for my career hands down.

A nurse that can hit a vein like a phlebotomist is every patients best friend : )
and I owe it all to my phlebotomy training.
Good luck OP and keep sticking those veins.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by _Highlander_
 


Yes..I have a question...why is it that when the person that draws the blood always asks the patient what their name and birthday is? The person's name and birth date are already on labels on the vials provided for the blood draw.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by TheComte
I have a question.

How many RFID chips do you 'install' in a typical day?

edit on 29-6-2011 by TheComte because: (no reason given)



Are you really serious? Do you actually think they are implanting chips into us while drawing our blood?



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by caladonea
 

They have to be sure they have the right person to match up with the vials.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by morder1
 


Good Morning!

No we don't keep 'DNA' on file, but after we collect your blood, and depending on the facilitys setup, we do store unused blood for up to two weeks. Doctors often add tests on after the collection when a result brings up a need for more tests, this is good because it can save the patient having to be re-bled.

In a 'Normal' checkup drugs and/or alcohol is not generally included, they are specific tests. On the request form given to you by the doctor it will usually say what the tests are. Every patient that I have bled or obtained a urine sample from that is being tested for drugs and/or alcohol will know that is what they are being tested for.

You can go to this website to find out what the tests are ; Labtests





posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by TheComte
 


HAHA... none that I am aware of. I don't see how it would be possible given the equipment I use and after all I am drawing blood, not injecting anything.



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by caladonea
 




The above poster is correct. We have to make sure you are you so we don't switch up your sample with another person. Even if we know you, and have seen you 100 times we are required and rightly so to follow a series of checks to be certain we have the right patient. All sorts of negative outcomes could occur if we did not do this.




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