How To Make A Convincing looking Plane Crash

page: 11
2
<< 8  9  10   >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 12:15 PM
link   

jmdewey60
reply to post by WarminIndy
 

Did you even just say that? What world do you live in that kerosene can't explode?
You invented your own definition of the word "explode".
An explosion requires an oxidising agent.
Kerosene is straight fuel with no oxidising agent added.
You would have to add that to make it explode.
What kerosene can do is to burn rapidly if heated up enough.


Definition of explosion



ex·plo·sion noun \ik-ˈsplō-zhən\ : the sudden, loud, and violent release of energy that happens when something (such as a bomb) breaks apart in a way that sends parts flying outward : a sudden and very fast increase : a sudden expression of some strong emotion Full Definition of EXPLOSION 1 : the act or an instance of exploding 2 : a large-scale, rapid, or spectacular expansion or bursting out or forth 3 : the release of occluded breath that occurs in one kind of articulation of stop consonants


What have I defined, jmdewey? Apparently YOU are the one who doesn't know what explosion means.

BLAST WAVES are the result of an EXPLOSION.



blast wave - a region of high pressure travelling through a gas at a high velocity; "the explosion created a shock wave" Synonyms: shock wave


What is Kerosene



Kerosene, sometimes known as paraffin oil, is a combustible liquid obtained by distilling petroleum at a high temperature



Kerosene is used as a primary source of fuel for many types of aircraft, including rockets, although in this case, the fuel is mixed with liquid oxygen in order to produce enough of a heating source.


Whaaaa, you mean jet fuel has LIQUID OXYGEN?

Definition of Combustible


com·bus·ti·ble [kuhm-buhs-tuh-buhl] Show IPA adjective 1. capable of catching fire and burning; inflammable; flammable: Gasoline vapor is highly combustible. 2. easily excited: a high-strung, combustible nature. noun 3. a combustible substance: Trucks carrying combustibles will not be allowed to use this tunnel.


Jet fuel (kerosene) is a combustible liquid capable of exploding, producing a blast wave. The OXIDIZING AGENT is LIQUID OXYGEN.


There are other chemicals that are oxidizing materials. For example, liquid air has been involved in many explosions because of its oxidizing properties. Liquid air itself has about 30% oxygen which makes it a powerful oxidant. However, when liquid air evaporates, it becomes richer in oxygen content when more volatile components evaporate slightly faster. Liquid nitrogen is safer and is preferred to liquid oxygen as a cryogenic liquid


Liquid nitrogen is safer than liquid oxygen.....???

jmdewey, you can't get around it, jet fuel is explosive, especially when something ignites it. The liquid oxygen provides the oxygen necessary to burn.

And jmdewey, have you ever seen a kerosene explosion? There are way too many videos and links to provide.




posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 12:20 PM
link   
reply to post by WarminIndy
 


Actually jet fuel doesn't have liquid oxygen. But kerosene vapors are quite explosive without liquid oxygen involved. It's like gasoline, but more explosive.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 01:06 PM
link   

Zaphod58
reply to post by WarminIndy
 


Actually jet fuel doesn't have liquid oxygen. But kerosene vapors are quite explosive without liquid oxygen involved. It's like gasoline, but more explosive.


And it exploded on 9/11. I am just amazed how people can't seem to grasp that the explosions were the result of a plane crash. I don't understand how they can say this knowing about planes exploding in crashes. It's not like 9/11 was the first time planes exploded.



I am from Ohio and every time we had the Dayton Air Show, we were always reminded of plane crashes and how they explode. How is it possible for planes to explode in every other circumstance except when flying into buildings?

There is a huge disconnect from conspiracy theorists and "Truthers".



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 02:01 PM
link   
reply to post by WarminIndy
 

What have I defined, jmdewey? Apparently YOU are the one who doesn't know what explosion means.
If you wanted to, you could blow up a paper bag and smash it between your hands, making a loud "bang" sound, and call it an explosion, but it would not be technically correct to state your conclusion that therefore paper bags are an explosive material.
edit on 23-9-2013 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 02:02 PM
link   
reply to post by jmdewey60
 


Yes, but paper bags don't kill several people a year, and are not considered explosions by experts. Kerosene, and jet fuel explosions are.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 02:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Zaphod58
 

Yes, but paper bags don't kill several people a year, and are not considered explosions by experts. Kerosene, and jet fuel explosions are.
The official classification is "flammable".
I don't see it being classified as an explosive.

You could hypothetically set up a burn in a sealed container and call the busting of it an explosion, using a no-technical definition.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 02:22 PM
link   
reply to post by jmdewey60
 


It's classified as flammable, but that doesn't mean it doesn't explode. There are dozens of reports by experts every year, that report kerosene explosions.

If kerosene doesn't explode, why does 10,000 gallons of it (roughly what was left on the planes at the time of impact), convert to over 330 tons of TNT? It shouldn't convert at all if it doesn't explode.



posted on Sep, 23 2013 @ 05:11 PM
link   

jmdewey60
reply to post by WarminIndy
 

What have I defined, jmdewey? Apparently YOU are the one who doesn't know what explosion means.
If you wanted to, you could blow up a paper bag and smash it between your hands, making a loud "bang" sound, and call it an explosion, but it would not be technically correct to state your conclusion that therefore paper bags are an explosive material.
edit on 23-9-2013 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)


Does the paper bag meet all the requirements of explosion according to the definition?

"the sudden, loud, and violent release of energy that happens when something (such as a bomb) breaks apart in a way that sends parts flying outward"

The sudden release of air from the blown paper bag still produces a blast wave. If you filled the bag with a flammable gas, such as oxygen, and then blew the paper bag over a match, then the paper bag, by nature of being a flammable fuel material, will still catch on fire.

What you aren't able to see is the fact that fuel tanks are simply containers for fuel, and that a breach of that container near an open flame will indeed cause an explosion.

Your car is internal combustion, each piston works because of tiny explosions of air meeting gas in a controlled environment. Obviously you don't understand that gas and gaseous state are the same thing. Jet fuel is liquid gas, that has not yet come to a gaseous state, but at the same time, the vapors of jet fuel, are at gaseous state.

And if you shake a can of Coca Cola (or Pepsi, or whatever), the carbon dioxide, GAS, is excited and quickly releases the contents all over you when you open it. That is intrinsically an explosion.

Nothing in the definition of explosion requires anything flammable, jmdewey, you just added that in yourself. But when you have a flammable material, an excited gas, and an ignition factor, then you will have a flammable explosion. But each one of them have a blast wave, because that's the release of energy. Remind me how your soda blows all over your face when your soda is just a liquid?





new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 8  9  10   >>

log in

join