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The Square Root Of A # Divided By The Same # Always = 1 Divided By That #

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posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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I always thought it was fairly interesting, at least if you're not thinking about the reasoning behind it..

Never fails, Any Number:





In a similar way, any number divided by the square root of that number will always equal just the square root of that number.





Is it a conspiracy? You be the judge!

p.s.. I know it's not a conspiracy that's why it's in this forum...


edit on 28-6-2011 by rstregooski because: beer

edit on 28-6-2011 by rstregooski because: more beer




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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Well the second one works because when you square a square root, you always get the number that was being squared.
sqrt(x)*sqrt(x) will always equal x. so x/sqrt(x)=sqrt(x)

the first one probably works somewhat like that...
Actually it works exactly like that but both sides are divided by 1^-1.
1/x/sqrt(x)= 1/sqrt(x)

which turns into
sqrt(x)/x=1/sqrt(x)
edit on 28-6-2011 by Ghost375 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Oh..I want a crack at this since I am a mathematical junky...

I want to bring up George Polya's problem solving method...the problem solver of problem solvers!

Although we are not talking about exponents the rules of exponents demonstration applies here...if we put a number in fractional form...even in the case of a square root number, the rules of expotential numbers apply to the base (square root) so when dividing exponent qualties to the same base the properties of the base remain common or constant.

Do I get a star now?



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by jerryznv
 

lol but I already proved it. it only involves multiplication and division, not exponents, besides the 1^-1, but that doesn't really count since you're only dividing both sides by it.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Ghost375
 


So what are you saying...I don't get a star?

Then I am not playing anymore!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Fascinating.....if you are in fifth grade.

Almost as good as: any number, divided by one, always equals that number.

Or: two plus two, equals four.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by CaptChaos
 

It's quite a bit more complicated than that, jack@ss.
Go back to your hole, troll. You're probably just mad that you couldn't figure it out on your own.


edit on 28-6-2011 by Ghost375 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by CaptChaos
 


Thats it...you don't get a star either...your not playing fair!




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by jerryznv
 

I'm not saying that. I just think I deserve some stars

I've never seen that problem before.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by Ghost375
 


I really do think my answer is correct and we can apply it to more of the same...I have to open word though so we can add some formula's in proper perspective...to avoid confusion.

The only way it would not apply is to negative integers or exponents...any radical or non-radical number though is fair game...try it.

Edit: Have a star on me Ghost...


edit on 28-6-2011 by jerryznv because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-6-2011 by jerryznv because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
reply to post by Ghost375
 


So what are you saying...I don't get a star?

Then I am not playing anymore!


you now have 588 stars...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by CaptChaos
Fascinating.....if you are in fifth grade.

Almost as good as: any number, divided by one, always equals that number.

Or: two plus two, equals four.


Maybe fascinating was the wrong choice of words, or that it was when I was in 5th grade that it was fascinating, or maybe your face is in 5th grade.

Interesting, anyway. What's fascinating is the applications of integration..



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by rstregooski
 


Forgive my humor...I could not resist...I flagged your thread because I would love to hear the theory disputed...I think it is solid...what do you think?

I mean we know it works...but why is the question...and I believe I have nailed it!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
reply to post by rstregooski
 


Forgive my humor...I could not resist...I flagged your thread because I would love to hear the theory disputed...I think it is solid...what do you think?

I mean we know it works...but why is the question...and I believe I have nailed it!


Humor's what this forum is all about.

I mean, the math makes sense, it's just interesting if you're not thinking of the reasoning behind it..

Obviously the square root of 25 is 5, so 5 divided by 25 is 1/5 or just 1/ √25...

Anyways...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by rstregooski
 


Right...right...thats where I think the rules of exponent demonstration apply...whenever you make any number the denominator in a fraction...square root or otherwise...you now subject it to new rules of mathematics...even if it is preceded by a numerator of one...still applies...right?



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by rstregooski
I always thought it was fairly interesting, at least if you're not thinking about the reasoning behind it..

Never fails, Any Number:




In a similar way, any number divided by the square root of that number will always equal just the square root of that number.





Is it a conspiracy? You be the judge!

p.s.. I know it's not a conspiracy that's why it's in this forum...


edit on 28-6-2011 by rstregooski because: beer

edit on 28-6-2011 by rstregooski because: more beer


Any number??? Try -1.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by 4nsicphd
 


yea yea... I meant of course any number you can take the square root of..



posted on Jun, 29 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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Originally posted by rstregooski
reply to post by 4nsicphd
 


yea yea... I meant of course any number you can take the square root of..


You can take the square root of any number - you just need some imagination. The square root of -1 is i



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