It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ancient stones a mystery for archeologists, scientists

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:53 PM
link   


As I have researched this idea of Ancient Hebrew or Israelite explorers or other countries to the Western Hemisphere long before Columbus, I have read about various artifacts that have been discovered over the years of research of Mayan temples and ruins as well as in other areas of the Americas. There is no definitive information at present to support this theory but I look at it this way: if they had the means to explore various parts of Europe and Asia by boat, then they certainly had the means to cross the seas to the Americas. One such item of interest is a large stone that was found in a dry creek bed in New Mexico. This stone discovered by early explorers contains the entire Ten Commandments written in Ancient Hebrew script. Today, this large stone still lies where it was originally found in the early 1800's on the side of Hidden Mountain near Los Lunas, New Mexico, about thirty-five miles south of Albuquerque. Scholars who have studied the stone say it pre-dates the arrival of Columbus to America.


Link




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:02 PM
link   
You sound like LDS.

Have you read Grant Palmers "Insiders View of the Book of Mormon"?

Joseph Smith claimed that the ancient hebrew people covered the north and south american continent. And DNA clearly shows they didn't at all. Plus the book of mormon is plagiarized through and through with the King James Bible which he used when he looked through a garden rock stone which members are never told. If they leak that out it is very timidly done like walking on eggs.

Plus read Simon Southerton's Lost Tribe book as well, he is a dna expert. They've analyzed thousand of indians and found NO dna what so ever.


edit on 28-6-2011 by thetiler because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:04 PM
link   
Very interesting information.

Is "Archaeology Daily News" a reputable source of information? I don't know that is why I ask.

I vaguely remember it being cited before but there does not seem to be any citations from scholarly and credible organisations. Not that this lack should be a test of veracity.

Generally, it seems that current and previous attempts to date the earliest American cultures seems to be undecided at the moment.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Nazirite
 


I posted it because it's linked via Wired and they're usually a very reputable source. I'm not pushing any agenda I just thought it was very interesting information showing that we previously discovered and interacted with more of the world than our paradigm would lead us to believe.

BTW I'm an Atheist so it's definitely not a religious agenda

edit on 28/6/11 by Imhotepsol because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Nazirite
 


Well, recently, they claimed that aliens were dug up in Africa, so yeah.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by Imhotepsol
reply to post by Nazirite
 


I posted it because it's linked via Wired and they're usually a very reputable source. I'm not pushing any agenda I just thought it was very interesting information showing that we previously discovered and interacted with more of the world than our paradigm would lead us to believe.

BTW I'm an Atheist so it's definitely not a religious agenda

edit on 28/6/11 by Imhotepsol because: (no reason given)


I'm not religious either - and didn't mean to question your reputation or that of the source.
Just trying to get my source and fact ratio on track.

I love info like this - just shows how little we know and how much we need to uncover - without prejudice.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Nazirite
 


Sorry mate I wasn't replying to you when I said that. The first poster said I sounded like a member of the LDS :/



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by PhantomLimb
reply to post by Nazirite
 


Well, recently, they claimed that aliens were dug up in Africa, so yeah.


That is interesting Phantom - Have you got a link for that?

One of the problems of the Alternative community is that they re-post info without checking source thereby undermining the effort and intention of keeping folks informed.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by Imhotepsol
reply to post by Nazirite
 


Sorry mate I wasn't replying to you when I said that. The first poster said I sounded like a member of the LDS :/


Ah! Gotcha - LDS = Later Day Saints (Mormons?)

My misunderstanding - don't understand how the first responder would have got the LDS message though.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Nazirite
 


I think this may be the link about the aliens, im not sure. The source at the top reads Pravda from what ive read from some they equate it to the west's version of the Enquirer.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:29 PM
link   
reply to post by topherman420
 


It says creatures but does infer aliens later on. That's not to say it's not true as they quote this


This is not the first such finding. In the summer of 1937 a group of Chinese scientists led by Professor Chi Putei surveyed the caves of Mount Bayan-Kara-Ula. Inside they found skeletons with excessively large heads and puny bodies. Nearby there were 176 stone plates. In the center of each plate there was a hole from which a spiral groove spread out to the perimeter with some characters on it.


This was actually true. I don't know about the Prava link though I can't see it on that site.
edit on 28/6/11 by Imhotepsol because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:35 PM
link   
reply to post by Imhotepsol
 


It doesnt link to pravda but the first part of that article at the top has Pravda, so im assuming that is their source.




June, 24 2011

This page is viewed 11531 times

Pravda

A team of anthropologists found a mysterious burial in the jungle near the city of Kigali Rwanda (Central Africa).


They are careful though and say this at the end:




However, the "alien" theory is not the only one. According to some researchers, the "giants" and "dwarfs" could be a mere side branch of humanity that once lived on Earth, but for some reason became extinct.


I guess its a good example of how, they can leave these articles open ended and up for interpretation for some. The articles can be submitted by members, and are peer reviewed, however im unsure of what the stipulations are for getting a publication.
The credibility shouldnt be condemned because of the article itself, but should heed warning to those who might accept these articles as pure fact.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:36 PM
link   
reply to post by Imhotepsol
 


From what I've heard of the carvings it's nigh impossible to date them, no one is quite sure when they were made. Of course those who want to perpetuate the myth of ancient Israelites getting there will believe this. It's a classic example of reaching a conclusion and then finding anything that could even tenuously support it, instead of reaching the conclusion based solely on the evidence.

While skeptical of this it isn't impossible for the ancient Hebrews to have reached the New World, it is, however, unlikely enough to cast hefty doubt on the age/validity of these carvings.

As for the source it is not an academic one, with statements like this:


Another question that haunts scientists and Bible historians is:  Did Jesus in His early years visit the American continents?


What legitimate scientist is haunted by so absurd a question? Perhaps Bible Historians, those that are still believers anyway, might consider the question but even mainstream Christian Biblical historians would be far from HAUNTED by such a prospect.

The stone's discovery is very suspect considering there is no record of it until 1933 by a man named Frank Hibben, a known fabricator of hoaxes. Would we not expect some earlier legends or stories from Europeans in the area before that? The wikipedia article on the stone casts quite a bit of doubt on the validity of the object:


Most modern scholars question much of Hibben's research today because of his work with alleged pre-Clovis sites. In at least two separate incidents, Hibbens fabricated some or all of his archaeological data to support his pre-Clovis migration theory.[2][3] These missteps call the rest of his work into question, and, for many, undermine the validity of his claims about the Los Lunas Decalogue Stone


Source

While not conclusive I'd say there's plenty of reason to dismiss the stone.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by topherman420
reply to post by Imhotepsol
 



The credibility shouldnt be condemned because of the article itself, but should heed warning to those who might accept these articles as pure fact.


That's sage advice when coming across any new information.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by topherman420
reply to post by Nazirite
 


I think this may be the link about the aliens, im not sure. The source at the top reads Pravda from what ive read from some they equate it to the west's version of the Enquirer.


Ah! Fair enough - Pravda as a source does somewhat reduce the credibility of the information.

Ironic that Pravda - Once one of the only sources of official government news (for western consumption) concerning the former Soviet Union is now relegated to tabloid fantasy similar to the National Enquirer.

Maybe the future will see the Wahington Post and New York Times acquire a similar accolade.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:51 PM
link   
The article gets a little stupid when it jumps right to Jesus with no real reason.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 02:11 PM
link   
@ Titen-Sxull - Cant' disagree with your sentiments.

Seems a fair and constructive appraisal.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nazirite

Originally posted by Imhotepsol
reply to post by Nazirite
 


Sorry mate I wasn't replying to you when I said that. The first poster said I sounded like a member of the LDS :/


Ah! Gotcha - LDS = Later Day Saints (Mormons?)

My misunderstanding - don't understand how the first responder would have got the LDS message though.


The LDS are constantly trying to push the book of mormon anytime they think they find hebrew origin in ancient america. And that link insinuated that for sure. Because the book of mormon is supposed to be about a family that leaves Jerusalem anciently and goes to america anciently. Again, dna shows that the people that lived in americal anciently are not of hebrew origin.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by Imhotepsol



One such item of interest is a large stone that was found in a dry creek bed in New Mexico. This stone discovered by early explorers contains the entire Ten Commandments written in Ancient Hebrew script. Today, this large stone still lies where it was originally found in the early 1800's on the side of Hidden Mountain near Los Lunas, New Mexico, about thirty-five miles south of Albuquerque. Scholars who have studied the stone say it pre-dates the arrival of Columbus to America.


Link


Some comments:
* Archaeologydaily.com is a blog and isn't selective or representative of what's going on in archaeology. Most of their stories are ... ah... not considered well respected or factual by scientists (particularly archaeologists and anthropologists.)
* The stone is neither ancient nor a mystery.
* The ancient Hebrews didn't have "ten commandments" -- there are 613 commandments
* There are no Hebrew monuments --ANYWHERE-- to the ten commandments. That's a Christian thing.
* The patina on the rock shows it was done within the past 100 years.
* It may be a pious fraud by Mormons to "prove" the Book of Mormon.
* The division of the ten commandments follows the Protestant division (the older Catholic version is different. Same text but they divide the sentences differently.)

No mystery, really.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nazirite

Very interesting information.

Is "Archaeology Daily News" a reputable source of information? I don't know that is why I ask.


No. It's not.



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join