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Your Time Is Wrong And I Will Tell You Why

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posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:31 AM
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Did you know that an experiment is being conducted where the powers that be are going to screw with your time...... LITERATELY?? This is not mainstream knowledge either. What happens if you are continuously late for work and then are subsequently fired?? Could this be possibly the largest class action lawsuit ever?? Who would even know?? Who would believe you if you told them?? Who authorized this?? Do we the people even have a say in this matter??




WASHINGTON (AP) — A yearlong experiment with the nation's electric grid could mess up traffic lights, security systems and some computers — and make plug-in clocks and appliances like programmable coffeemakers run up to 20 minutes fast.

"A lot of people are going to have things break and they're not going to know why," said Demetrios Matsakis, head of the time service department at the U.S. Naval Observatory, one of two official timekeeping agencies in the federal government.

Since 1930, electric clocks have kept time based on the rate of the electrical current that powers them. If the current slips off its usual rate, clocks run a little fast or slow. Power companies now take steps to correct it and keep the frequency of the current — and the time — as precise as possible.

The group that oversees the U.S. power grid is proposing an experiment that would allow more frequency variation than it does now without corrections, according to a company presentation obtained by The Associated Press.




"Is anyone using the grid to keep track of time?" McClelland said. "Let's see if anyone complains if we eliminate it."

No one is quite sure what will be affected. This won't change the clocks in cellphones, GPS or even on computers, and it won't have anything to do with official U.S. time or Internet time.

But wall clocks and those on ovens and coffeemakers — anything that flashes "12:00" when it loses power — may be just a bit off every second, and that error can grow with time.

It's not easy figuring what will run fast and what won't. For example, VCRs or DVRs that get their time from cable systems or the Internet probably won't be affected, but those with clocks tied to the electric current will be off a bit, Matsakis said.

This will be an interesting experiment to see how dependent our timekeeping is on the power grid, Matsakis said.


www.rdmag.com...




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:39 AM
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This article asks more questions than it answers... How will allowing the frequency to change (by a very small amount... 20 minutes fast in a year is much less than one part in hundred thousand) provide a benefit? Why are the 3 regional grids at different maximum variances? Will the frequency under this regime ever be LESS than 60 Hz? This is a potentially disruptive thing to try so broadly as an "experiment". Is there any adult supervision?


www.rdmag.com...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:42 AM
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Just get a watch....

2nd



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:43 AM
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Clock in my car works fine without any power from the grid, as does my watch, as will any battery powered clock...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:48 AM
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Ok, Ok


But think of the ramifications of this "test" on the people that it WILL effect (and they will never know). Imagine getting later and later for work and appointments as the months go by. Imagine thinking it's because you're just getting old. What other "tests" are they preforming on the public without our knowledge?? This article makes chem-trails seem all the more feasible!!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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The article you posted says that it could make clocks run 20 minutes fast. This means that you would be early to work... not late.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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reply to post by ProphecyPhD
 


Just a quick point:

With the advent of the internet, and interconnectivity meaning that a heart surgeon in England can perform a bypass in Bali if the tech is present, I would have thought that this sort of electrical precision is no longer important. Surely with the advances in internect connectivity, a clock could be fitted with a bluetooth, or wireless reciever, and connected to the nearest atomic clock in real time? The attatchment could include an automatic adjustor to eliminate the differences in time caused by distance from the source of the data,and connection speed. The algorithms which would make such a thing possible are far from Einsteinian in thier subtlety and complexity (although I am a complete idiot when it comes to mathematics, I am aware that the theoretical capacity to do this simply exists through researches I have done along similar lines for other reasons).

Adjusting the entire grid, so that devices run via that grid can be timed more precisely is hardly one of the most pressing concerns facing the US at the moment, and I would have thought that fixing it so that solar flares are less likely to cause mass blackouts , and infrastructrual destruction , would be a much better reason to begin a series of potentialy harmful tinkerings.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by ProphecyPhD
Imagine getting later and later for work and appointments as the months go by.

If work/the people you have appointments with are all on the same grid, how would they know you were late?
Wouldnt't their clocks be off, too?



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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Since 1930, electric clocks have kept time based on the rate of the electrical current that powers them. If the current slips off its usual rate, clocks run a little fast or slow. Power companies now take steps to correct it and keep the frequency of the current — and the time — as precise as possible.


This is bs.

There are numerous ways for a clock to set the period between strokes but by far the most common (this includes digital wristwatches) is to use a crystal.

The crystal oscillates at a set frequency which determines the period of a second. Due to fluctuations of magnitude in voltage sources, the clock is designed to operate on less voltage than the source can provide (ever wonder why the clocks that run on a AA cell don't slow down as the battery runs low - they usually hit a voltage threshold and then just stop) to avoid erratic timekeeping.



edit on 28/6/2011 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:54 AM
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Sorry to say, but already posted last night here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Lot's of useful information in that thread.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by ProphecyPhD
 


Can you please explain how people will get "later and later for work"
if these electric clocks will be gaining time by twenty minutes a year.
Surely this will mean people will be getting earlier and earlier for work.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:05 AM
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I keep my alarm clock set 20 minutes fast anyway. The only time I look at it is when the annoying klaxon alarm goes off. I don’t even own a watch anymore. I have my HTC EVO with a nice huge clock right on its home screen.

If I'm reading the article correctly, they want to do this so they can save a bit of cash. I don’t think its some grand conspiracy to make us all late for work just so we get fired.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:05 AM
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Originally posted by rykc27
reply to post by ProphecyPhD
 


Can you please explain how people will get "later and later for work"
if these electric clocks will be gaining time by twenty minutes a year.
Surely this will mean people will be getting earlier and earlier for work.


Some people will gain 20 minutes, some people will lose 20. It's called a FLUCTUATION. Some people refer to it as "give or take".



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:08 AM
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My point is this:

They are taking the ability of our "primitive" clocks to tell the correct time and not even telling us because this is an "experiment". Imagine what else they are "experimenting" with.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
The article you posted says that it could make clocks run 20 minutes fast. This means that you would be early to work... not late.


holy crap, that's even worse.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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Check out the thread that Project Blue linked above. Very interesting indeed!!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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Nevermind.

Someone already took care of it.

edit on 28-6-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
Nevermind.

Someone already took care of it.

edit on 28-6-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



I believe i said that



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by ProphecyPhD

Originally posted by butcherguy
Nevermind.

Someone already took care of it.

edit on 28-6-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



I believe i said that
Yes you did, so I edited my post.

Good job.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:54 AM
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Use a clock with a battery?

Very sensational dude. Very.
edit on 28-6-2011 by 547000 because: (no reason given)




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