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Appliance Disruptions Feared In Power Grid Test

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posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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I suppose if someone is concerned about accuracy, they can fork over a little extra dough for a radio controlled clock. They remain accurate because they receive a low frequency AM broadcast signal vs. AC current synchronization. More here:


NIST radio station WWVB is located on the same site as WWV near Ft. Collins, Colorado. The WWVB broadcasts are used by millions of people throughout North America to synchronize consumer electronic products like ExactSet clocks. In addition, WWVB is used for high level applications such as ClockWatch Radio Sync network time synchronization and frequency calibrations.


www.atomictimeclock.com...

www.atomictimeclock.com...

But if you start messing with the pre programmed timer on my Mr. Coffee, we got problems!


/MD
edit on 28-6-2011 by MaskedDebater because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by w3nd1g0
It will however affect the system clocks of anything using the frequency of the grid to measure time.

I do find the aurora paper and interesting read though.


Your quite welcome. I did find that its the NERC that has issued guidelines
on the Aurora V ...

Same company that is involved with this test.
Another hmmmmm........


The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) on Thursday issued a recommendation to the electric power industry providing sensitive information about the so-called “AURORA vulnerability”—gaps in critical infrastructure protection concerning large motors and generators connected to the bulk power system.

The “technical library,” available at the “For Official Use Only” (FOUO) classification level by NERC’s federal partners, are located on protected sites on the NERC Regional portals for industry use. NERC requires potentially affected entities, including generator and transmission owners and operators, to report on efforts and progress by Dec. 13 and to provide updates every six months until mitigation is complete


www.powermag.com...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


NERC or North American Electric Reliability Corps does make its living from such tests and recommendations tho as it is after all the nature of its business.

I am liking these CME theories and magnetic space cloud theories though.

I dont see anything connecting the dots for sure though as yet? but i do find that the comments made regarding "illiminating" the time sync aspect via frequency as very odd and suspect indeed.

Having already tested a similar thing it Italy though.. it looks quite a standard test. I am not sure that the grounds for the test are genuine though. I dont think that changing the frequency of the grid "just to see if anyones perception of time is affected" is a solid enough reason for the tests on its own.

Maybe there is another technology being tested that requires these slightly different frequencies?

Maybe there is another reason for these tests alltogether? I just dont buy into the "time" reason as surely that would cause people to be late for work, some appliances are expected to fail or break, and that this would not help prevent any vulnerabilities in the network.

My brain is currently thinking tho.... "if my $3500 television set breaks due to these tests which (for example) has just run out of waranty.. then who foots the bill for this damage?"

Maybe they are hoping that these tests are under reported and its a capitalist tactic to damage electrical items under the radar and thus re-increase sales in such products? THE PLOT (POSSIBLY) THICKENS!!!!




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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Originally posted by w3nd1g0
reply to post by burntheships
 



I am liking these CME theories and magnetic space cloud theories though.

I dont see anything connecting the dots for sure though as yet? but i do find that the comments made regarding "illiminating" the time sync aspect via frequency as very odd and suspect indeed.

Having already tested a similar thing it Italy though.. it looks quite a standard test. I am not sure that the grounds for the test are genuine though. I dont think that changing the frequency of the grid "just to see if anyones perception of time is affected" is a solid enough reason for the tests on its own.

Maybe there is another technology being tested that requires these slightly different frequencies?

Maybe there is another reason for these tests alltogether? I just dont buy into the "time" reason as surely that would cause people to be late for work, some appliances are expected to fail or break, and that this would not help prevent any vulnerabilities in the network.

My brain is currently thinking tho.... "if my $3500 television set breaks due to these tests which (for example) has just run out of waranty.. then who foots the bill for this damage?"

Maybe they are hoping that these tests are under reported and its a capitalist tactic to damage electrical items under the radar and thus re-increase sales in such products? THE PLOT (POSSIBLY) THICKENS!!!!



Yes, its all leaving my brain in a spin....

Lets see...so many possibilities.

I dont buy the one they put forth...seriously what the ?

"lets break it and see if anyone complains".

Well its obviously the consumer that is left hanging here, as I am sure that the power companies,
utilities so on will have ample notice to change and deal accordingly.

As for the folks out in the boondocks...well we shall see.

This is going to be interesting for sure.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


"lets break it and see if anyone complains".

this is very disturbing , still can not really comprehend the intentions of this comment. It has left me with an uneasy feeling...

Something is up and its going to happen soon. Sooner than we may even think...

maybe I am just reading to much into it though....


Oh the woe and troubles.......




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:15 AM
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Originally posted by burntheships

Yes, its all leaving my brain in a spin....

Lets see...so many possibilities.

I dont buy the one they put forth...seriously what the ?



Actually I did just find a possible link between the apparent tests and CME's or Electromagnetic storms.

If I remember it correctly that is.....

Im pretty sure it was in the 1840's or something.. but a huge electromagnetic wave from the sun caused telegraph centres to sponteaneously catch fire due to a raise in electrical activity over the communications grid. Must have been a increase in wave length due to the solar flare and is documented (somewhere but being at work will have to search and post a link later im afraid).
i dont like being sloppy with sources


Anyhoo...

This would be an ideal cover up for such a flare surely? As consumers will be expecting a raise in frequency.. weather its cause is CME based or man made is neither here nor there for everyday jo bloggs now is it?

I would say tho that it would be easier to sue NERC than it would to sue the sun itself!


EDIT: Found the info i was looking for .. obviously not working too hard today



May 6, 2008: At 11:18 AM on the cloudless morning of Thursday, September 1, 1859, 33-year-old Richard Carrington—widely acknowledged to be one of England's foremost solar astronomers—was in his well-appointed private observatory. Just as usual on every sunny day, his telescope was projecting an 11-inch-wide image of the sun on a screen, and Carrington skillfully drew the sunspots he saw.


Source
edit on 28-6-2011 by w3nd1g0 because: (no reason given)



Another EDIT.. Notice how in this article that they state "Aurora-induced" currents allowed for continued message transmission dispite having disconnected the batteries from the equipment. And funnily enough they nicknamed the vulnerabilty "the aurora vulnerability" lol


just saying!
edit on 28-6-2011 by w3nd1g0 because: another add as obviously getting excited on this subject and feels remotely usefull for once! lol



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:32 AM
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I see everyone worried about their clocks, but what about all our industries that use a 60 Hz power supply? What about all of those factories whose machines are driven by motors that require a 60Hz power supply?

How will this affect newer variable frequency drives that are so popular to save energy today in industry?

All I have are questions. No answers, sorry.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by w3nd1g0
Im pretty sure it was in the 1840's or something.. but a huge electromagnetic wave from the sun caused telegraph centres to sponteaneously catch fire due to a raise in electrical activity over the communications grid. Must have been a increase in wave length due to the solar flare and is documented (somewhere but being at work will have to search and post a link later im afraid).
i dont like being sloppy with sources



Increase in wavelength of what, exactly? Telegraph systems don't have one.

The reason for the problems was that telegraph lines are a long unbroken conductor with an earth return, which is just what you don't want during the geomagnetic heave associated with a CME.



This would be an ideal cover up for such a flare surely? As consumers will be expecting a raise in frequency.. weather its cause is CME based or man made is neither here nor there for everyday jo bloggs now is it?


why do you think a CME would cause a "raise in frequency"? What you'd get would be unmistakable - the power grid would fail, if anything, due to loss of long-line distribution when the geomagnetic heave saturates the transformers. Then the clocks will be very off - only right twice a day, for analog ones.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:26 AM
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This doesn't make sense at all. Too many things require 60Hz to operate. Hell, most relays and breakers are set to trip at variances of .3Hz. Ever seen the wrong frequency input to a transformer? It aint pretty.

Makes no sense what so ever.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by tnhiker
This doesn't make sense at all. Too many things require 60Hz to operate. Hell, most relays and breakers are set to trip at variances of .3Hz. Ever seen the wrong frequency input to a transformer? It aint pretty.

Makes no sense what so ever.
Exactly.

So much of our equipment today is very sensitive to frequency variation.

I had to work on something that some Amish fellows tried to power up with a generator hooked up to the flywheel on a farm tractor with a belt driving it. They thought they had the RPMs right, but loading the generator caused the belt to slip a bit, causing a drop in Hz from the generator. Needless to say, the solid state components that they were powering with the generator did not function correctly.

I still wonder what the effect would be on the VFD's that you find so frequently on today's energy efficient equipment.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by w3nd1g0
 


Thanks for the CME info, going to read iup on this now.
If I remember correctly there were two large ones in the past that affected the grid?



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
I see everyone worried about their clocks, but what about all our industries that use a 60 Hz power supply? What about all of those factories whose machines are driven by motors that require a 60Hz power supply?

How will this affect newer variable frequency drives that are so popular to save energy today in industry?

All I have are questions. No answers, sorry.


Not to sound like a broken clock

Yet I keep going back to what that guy said....

Lots of people are going to have things break, and they are not going to know why it happened.

Yeah, this makes no sense whatsoever!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy

Originally posted by tnhiker
This doesn't make sense at all. Too many things require 60Hz to operate. Hell, most relays and breakers are set to trip at variances of .3Hz. Ever seen the wrong frequency input to a transformer? It aint pretty.

Makes no sense what so ever.
Exactly.

So much of our equipment today is very sensitive to frequency variation.

I had to work on something that some Amish fellows tried to power up with a generator hooked up to the flywheel on a farm tractor with a belt driving it. They thought they had the RPMs right, but loading the generator caused the belt to slip a bit, causing a drop in Hz from the generator. Needless to say, the solid state components that they were powering with the generator did not function correctly.

I still wonder what the effect would be on the VFD's that you find so frequently on today's energy efficient equipment.


Well, VFD's are probably gonna have to be redesigned to make them work correctly. Also what about the new electric vehicles and the EVSE that controls power? It generates a signal between it and the car for communication, that could be disrupted.
It doesn't say how much they are going to allow the frequency to drift, and obviously a few 0.1Hz wont make much of a difference, but if they go 1Hz or more its gonna be nasty. Not to mention the cost of the utilities are going to go up because of the time and manpower they spend reprogramming their protective relays. Standards will have to be redone, especially IEEE 1547 which deals with connecting a DG device to the grid.

I think its going to be a CF, but thats my personal opinion.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by w3nd1g0
 


From your link:


Just before dawn the next day, skies all over planet Earth erupted in red, green, and purple auroras so brilliant that newspapers could be read as easily as in daylight. Indeed, stunning auroras pulsated even at near tropical latitudes over Cuba, the Bahamas, Jamaica, El Salvador, and Hawaii.

science1.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by tnhiker


I think its going to be a CF, but thats my personal opinion.


Ok, now ya got me...whats a CF?



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


A cluster.. uhm, foul up.




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 
CLUSTER-F--K?

Me thinks it will be too.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by guessing
 


I did find this very interesting also. There is definitely more going on here that we are being told.
I can understand why this has been kept quiet.

Senate Judiciary Subcommittee Hearing: Obama’s Cybersecurity Proposals



The hearing was conducted by Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, of Rhode Island. He began by pointing out that cyber attacks are an urgent threat to national security, but moreover they directly harm Americans by “invading our privacy and loot our intellectual property.” He called four witnesses to testify:

Congressman Jim Langevin of Rhode Island James A. Baker, Associate Deputy Attorney General at the Department of Justice Greg Schaffer, Acting Deputy Under Secretary of the National Protection and Programs Directorate, in the Department of Homeland Security. Ari Schwartz, Senior Internet Policy Advisor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the Department of Commerce. While several senators came and went (most notably Senator Chris Coons of Delaware), the hearing was anchored by Senators Whitehouse and Blumenthal. Both repeatedly emphasized the seriousness of modern cyberattacks, with Blumenthal hypothesizing that the next 9/11 may be a cyber attack (echoing Leon Panetta’s “the next Pearl Harbor” forecast). Senator Whitehouse cited the startling McAfee Night Dragon report energy sector and power grid vulnerability, finding that a number of other industries share the same problems. Web security company Symantec announced that an evolutionary change in hacking sophistication means that now the US must assume that all networks can always be compromised.

Serious threats recounted by Jim Baker were:

Escalating zero-day attacks, where hackers exploit software weaknesses that haven’t been discovered yet, and so can’t be protected against. One example is the Aurora exploit. Insider threats, which include intentional espionage, but focus on the much greater threat posed by unintentional breeches created by US www.allmedialp.com...


So, right there we have the mention of the power grid with the Aurora V .

They describe the Aurora exploit as a Zero Day scenario,
The Night Dragon Report has info on that, and The Aurora Exploit , which is different ( I assume) than the Aurora
Vulnerability.




That article is from June 24th, 2011, just a few days ago.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


Ah, well I see
thanks.
...it certainly has big potential...

I just read that subcommitee report and they say that cyber attacks coupled with
this Aurora Exploit, and the power grid (I am assuming that is the Aurora V) could be
the next 9/11 or Pearl Harbor.

Now, I am not liking that at all. Wow.

edit on 28-6-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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Bring the power down and you can do virtually anything you like and frame whoever you want...communications are key in war for strategy and morale....
www.isoc.org...
I've just realised I've got a very sick and dark mind




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