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NY cop admits framing people on drug charges and teaching younger cops to do the same

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posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:15 AM
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Just 24 days in PC on Rikers? Please....

put him in general population...

I am sure he will meet those he locked away....

and they will be more than happy to show him around...




posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:44 AM
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reply to post by _Highlander_
 





I have spoken to a few of the old cops where I live, and they tell me back in their day it was common place to put a false charge on a criminal who needed to be off the street. The key word is 'Criminal' here. The cops knew who the crims were, but due to to process/legal loopholes etc... they could not get them off the streets. So they would book them with a made up charge and put them where they should be, and joe citizen could go about their day in peace.



Are you serious??

Thats like me saying "I know my wife is cheating, i can't prove it but i KNOW it!! Let me set her up to make it look like she's cheating so i can divorce the witch"

Then i tell you i'm a good guy and my wife was a whore (and you believe me).



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:49 AM
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It is such a difficult thing. On one hand this is an awful, awful thing to do. On the other I know the life of a cop is a dirty one and if he was only applying it to "bad guys" than that's probably not as unusual as some might think. But its a slippery slope and there is a reason cops are cops and judges are judges...we don't live in the world of Judge Dredd lol...police don't get to decide who is right and who is wrong, the system contains those safeguards for a reason.

Ultimately rule of law must prevail. That's why its, well, the law.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by TheButcher23
Actually it seems that ATS manages to find the rare and few Cops who spoil it for the rest.

Without cops and the law most of YOU would be dead by now as chaos would ensue. And the weak are always the first to go!!


So if i am not deputized by the state then i am not capable of protecting my self, property or neighbors?? I do not know right from wrong and i need someone there to explain it to me?? Police are around 24/7 and if they weren't riots would break out??

That sounds foolish.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by Partygirl
It is such a difficult thing. On one hand this is an awful, awful thing to do. On the other I know the life of a cop is a dirty one and if he was only applying it to "bad guys" than that's probably not as unusual as some might think. But its a slippery slope and there is a reason cops are cops and judges are judges...we don't live in the world of Judge Dredd lol...police don't get to decide who is right and who is wrong, the system contains those safeguards for a reason.

Ultimately rule of law must prevail. That's why its, well, the law.


So if i am a Police officer and I say YOU are a bad guy, would you accept that as fact and not be mad when i plant something on you??



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:57 AM
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If you can't legally arrest a "bad guy" then maybe, just maybe he's not such a "bad guy" after all. Stop watching movies. "Bad Guys" commit crimes and their cronies are usually willing and able to "snitch". If you have to frame a guy then guess what....... YOU are the real bad guy.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 05:59 AM
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Like roaches, where there's one in the light there are a hundred in the shadows.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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reply to post by TheButcher23
 


Your talking crap. The Police is crap and corrupt, there are better Alternatives. Some country surely need the Police but most would be better off without any #ty corrupt cops. For example mexico.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by wardk28
I will play devils advocate in this story. What if those the two guys he set up on drug charges; one was a child molester that got off because the legal system fail and the other was implicated in several robberies but there was never enough evidence to arrest and convict? Maybe thats why he only got 24 days. We all talk about how messed up the legal system is and how someone should do something about it. Maybe this was his way of "doing something" about it. So what I'm asking is what you guys think about it. Would you guys be able to plant evidence on someone you know was involved in criminal activity, especially when it caused pain to many people?


That isn't your call to make. What if I thought you were a child molester but it turned out you weren't, would that justify you going to jail for 10 years because some cop thought it was necessary?

Would you happily go to jail if the cop thought you were a child molester and planted drugs on you?

If the person was a child molester and the judge decided there wasn't enough evidence than that is the system we put in place. We did not give cops the authority to play judge and plant evidence for their benefit.

And why would the cop need to plant evidence? Isn't he competent enough to investigate these criminal activities? Than why do they go to school to be a cop? I can walk around and plant drugs on people who I suspect of being heavy into criminal activities but that would be incompetence.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:15 AM
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Originally posted by Elsek
reply to post by SFA437
 


You say sooner or later that guy will go away? Very true but is that before or after he kills, rapes, sells drugs to kids? Just wondering.


Yes. Whether it is before or after he/she commits additional crimes is not relevant and here is why...

If the officer involved in framing the suspect is found out and it goes public every single one of the officer's collars are going to be screaming "He set me up too". The desire to get one or two guys behind bars illegally then sets in motion a chain of events that could free dozens.

You either make a legal arrest and get the skell legit or you don't make the collar at all.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by TheButcher23
 


Yeah, police are needed in PROPER cities, where fools have been brainwashed into thinking the only weapon they may have is a cellphone with 911 on speed dial. Oh yeah that's right, most PROPER cities have outlawed self defense and guns. Funny how in PROPER cities, it is always more likely to be mugged or jumped than in the country. I will keep my country living, and my guns. The fools can have their PROPER cities



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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I really hope this story,the Hyde Park one about the two cops arrested for murdering the girl on St. Patrick's day, and the video arrest/release one will chill the cop defenders for a little while.

It isn't "just a few bad apples"....the problem is a "bad culture".

Not all cops are bad guys who actively violate the trust and persons of the the public. But there are a lot more than most cops will acknowledge. And vastly more passive enablers who look the other way. How many Hyde Park cops are passively complicit in the Hyde Park murder? Cops who knew, cops who suspected, cops who refused to follow leads that led back to the cop shop? How many others did these guys kill because their fellow cops allowed it?

If this cop planted evidence three times that he admitted to, there were most likely more, these are just the times he got caught. Every young cop he trained or worked with needs to be suspended immediately until their arrests can be reviewed and completely verified as legal and untainted with the slightest whiff false testimony, planted evidence or other signs of corruption. Every senior cop he worked with needs to be suspended until an investigation is complete into why they allowed him to break the law with impunity. Any who claimed not to notice should be demoted or fired for incompetence.

And finally, the judge should be impeached for applying a two-tier justice system: he let this cop off with less than a slap on the wrist, given the enormity of the crimes committed. A citizen who perjured himself in three different cases that sent innocent people (imagine if it were three "innocent" cops ruined and jailed....yeah, I know, but suppose they were innocent) would not be treated so lightly in any court I'm aware of.

Until the cops as a whole acknowledge the extant of the problems, they will always engender distrust and hatred in the people whose support they need. Power addiction is the same as any other: until you admit you have a problem, not much is going to improve, and you will continue to damage the lives of those around you.

Edit to add:

Any awards that the people he framed get and all costs associated with those cases should be charged to the budget of the police department involved, reducing the pay of all members until the citizens are repaid. It isn't right that taxpayers should be abused and then forced to pay for the consequences of the abuse they recieved. A law should be passed that places the consequences on those responsible for engendering them. Want to bet that would be a big start towards cleaning up corrupt cop cultures? All awards for police misbehavior should be deducted from the pay of all members of the departments involved...there would be far less tolerance of "bad apples" if that were the norm.

edit on 28-6-2011 by apacheman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by apacheman
Every young cop he trained or worked with needs to be suspended immediately until their arrests can be reviewed and completely verified as legal and untainted with the slightest whiff false testimony, planted evidence or other signs of corruption. Every senior cop he worked with needs to be suspended until an investigation is complete into why they allowed him to break the law with impunity. Any who claimed not to notice should be demoted or fired for incompetence.


So you wish to engage in the same behavior as the sergeant did... cause harm to people who might have done something wrong without evidence or proof.

Interesting.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


Not without evidence or proof. I said until they could be reviewed and ensured that no illegalities occurred. I'm absolutely certain that not every young cop he trained accepted his bull# as proper. Not all followed his lead (at least I certainly hope so).

But...and this is a big BUT...none seem to have turned him in, either. They knew he was committing perjury and falsifying evidence yet failed to report it. So they engaged in a conspiracy to violate the law, correct?

Aren't there regulations that demand/require a police officer to report wrongdoing he or she is aware of within the ranks?

This is not a gray area. It is strictly either/or with no wiggle room whatsoever. This cop was/is a lawbreaker who taught others how to break the law themselves with full awareness that they were doing so. They failed to act and cost citizens their jobs, freedom, friends, and economic well-being for their private gain (not necessarily monetary). In any other field they would be charged as co-conspirators in an ongoing criminal enterprise.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by gnosticquasar
Yeah, 24 days is about long enough I think.


Sure, but it generally takes about 30-45 days for processing before a criminal will ever see prison. He will still be getting shuffled through the system before his 'final destination'.

Damn shame too, as you're exactly correct in what he should expect from a visit to Rikers.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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Wouldn't it be interesting to hear his first conversation with his new cellmate:

Whatcha in for?

Oh, I'm a dirty cop that fabricated evidence in drug cases.





posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by apacheman
reply to post by SFA437
 


Not without evidence or proof. I said until they could be reviewed and ensured that no illegalities occurred. I'm absolutely certain that not every young cop he trained accepted his bull# as proper. Not all followed his lead (at least I certainly hope so).

But...and this is a big BUT...none seem to have turned him in, either. They knew he was committing perjury and falsifying evidence yet failed to report it. So they engaged in a conspiracy to violate the law, correct?

Aren't there regulations that demand/require a police officer to report wrongdoing he or she is aware of within the ranks?

This is not a gray area. It is strictly either/or with no wiggle room whatsoever. This cop was/is a lawbreaker who taught others how to break the law themselves with full awareness that they were doing so. They failed to act and cost citizens their jobs, freedom, friends, and economic well-being for their private gain (not necessarily monetary). In any other field they would be charged as co-conspirators in an ongoing criminal enterprise.


This is what concerned me:

"Every young cop he trained or worked with needs to be suspended immediately until their arrests can be reviewed and completely verified as legal and untainted with the slightest whiff false testimony, planted evidence or other signs of corruption. Every senior cop he worked with needs to be suspended until an investigation is complete into why they allowed him to break the law with impunity. Any who claimed not to notice should be demoted or fired for incompetence.

I read that as suspending the officers before any investigation which is attributing wrongdoing to them prior to and proof being brought forth.

As for guilt by association- as a rookie you do not automatically go wherever your FTO is, nor do officers have each other in direct line of sight every second of the day. As for supervisors (I was a Sergeant) I did not have every single officer under my own personal surveillance throughout their shifts.

If you were referring only to the officers he admitted to instructing on how to plant evidence and jam people up- I am in agreement 100%. If you are referring to ANY officer he had as a rookie then I respectfully disagree on the suspension but I agree on reviewing their arrests and investigations.

Hope I explained my position well enough.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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Should watch that movie "Righteous Kill" with Robert De Niro and Al Pacino. Maybe should also watch "Street Kings" and "Training Day". The criminal and law world does not work the same as you imagine. Hollywood exaggerate as usual to dramatize but they are usually not too far off from reality.

What do you do when you know the suspect is guilty but there is just no way to come up with substantial evidence?

What if a Police Officer or a Federal Investigator witness the crime but the criminal was too smart to leave evidence behind?

What if it's a baby killer about to walk off a case due to lack of these said evidence?

Hey, I'm not saying planting/faking evidence or reports is a good thing.. But this world is not really all black and white, right or wrong.

The legal system is a mess, there is no such thing as justice prevails. It's all about how much money you got and whether or not if you could afford an expensive lawyer and pay your way outta jail. Take OJ for instance, take Linsey Lohan, heck, take any celebrity or person with cash oozing out of their ass cracks.

The interesting thing about our legal system is the saying: "None are guilty until proven in a court of law." Even if I witness you microwave your own baby, it's not sufficient to judge you on the spot. I have to wait for quite a long time before having court sessions to convict you, and even then a proper conviction will require a lot of substantial evidence.

You do realize what this means right? It isn't justice, it's who can work the system better, who can think up better loop holes, which judge to grease, which juries to pick in your favor... etc etc. Watch "The Devil's Advocate".

Again I am not trying to say planting evidence and faking reports is "Righteous", I'm just seriously contemplating right now whether or not if it's "Necessary Evil".


edit on 6/28/2011 by truthseeker84 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by jam321
 


Just cause hes a cop doesnt mean he doesnt have to pay for his crimes.

Why do you stick up for cops so much, and believe that they are always right no matter what?

You have nothing to say about the evidence hes planting on people? This guy is just as much of a criminal as the rest of them locked up.

This guy is lucky he only got 24 days. He should be bowing down kissing the ground right now.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


Agreed.

I wasn't as clear as intended. I meant to imply those he had control over or supervised, not incidental contact, and those directly over him.

When you are a supervisor, you ARE responsible for the behavior of those under you. If they pulled the wool over your eyes, you are STILL responsible, albeit in a different way. It's your job to KNOW. No excuses.

That's one of the issues I have with cops acting/thinking like they are military, not civilians. In the military I served in, the supervisor would face a court-martial for dereliction of duty if someone under him did this, and at a minimum would get his career curtailed, whether he directly knew or not. Police don't come anywhere near the commitment to duty, honor and integrity that the military does, because the military holds its own accountable and punishes them severely for transgressions. Police generally protect each other from discovery and punishment...huge, vast difference.




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