It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A refrigerator that runs without electricity.

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 06:12 AM
link   
Well, its not another zero point energy device. Its how a simple potter built a thermally insulated container that can store vegetables for 1 week. Lower electricity costs and reduce carbon outputs. Wonder why these don't become populer.



It took him four years to get the combination right, mixing and churning different types of clay in different proportions. He hit the jackpot with an unusual addition of sawdust and sand, which makes the soil porous and the interiors cold.
''It keeps the water cool. Vegetables kept inside it can last up to a week," said Prajapati Mansukhbhai Raghavjibhai, Creator, Mitticool.


Read more at: NDTV India
edit on 27/6/11 by asen_y2k because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 07:20 AM
link   
DUH! Basic physics : evaporation causes cooling.

Have you never created a self cooling fridge when camping ?

Ever wonder why those bedouins in the desert carry water in a porous goat skin?

Nothing mysterious or even original here.



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 07:36 AM
link   
reply to post by malcr
 


I had never heard of such a thing before



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 08:09 AM
link   

Originally posted by asen_y2k
Wonder why these don't become populer.
It sounds like he's selling a decent number of them and could sell a lot more if he went commercial. But it will never get down to 40 degrees F (4 degrees C), the temperature my refrigerator is at. Water and other substances like freon cool when they evaporate. Water only cools so much, and the evaporator unit on a fridge can get to lower temperatures because freon evaporates at lower temperatures.

There's a wiki on the evaporative coolers, there are many types:

Evaporative cooler

Some of them use electricity, but it's not for the cooling, but for moving the cooled air to where it's needed, and things like that. Even the big cooling towers you see at nuke plants like three mile island, use evaporative cooling.

Some of the early car air conditioners used this principle: en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 27-6-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 09:01 AM
link   
You can buy a Peltier module for like $15.

Plug a solar panel into it. It will cool your cooler. No electricity from the grid.

In the old days people used kerosene refrigerators. I think you can still buy them....everywhere's except the united states. Uses a simple stirling engine to chill the chiller. no electricity required.



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 09:20 AM
link   

Originally posted by malcr
DUH! Basic physics : evaporation causes cooling.

Have you never created a self cooling fridge when camping ?

Ever wonder why those bedouins in the desert carry water in a porous goat skin?

Nothing mysterious or even original here.



Off your high horse. This man is making something that will make a difference to a lot of peoples lifes... So yes it is original and news worthy...



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 09:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by purplemer

Originally posted by malcr
DUH! Basic physics : evaporation causes cooling.

Have you never created a self cooling fridge when camping ?

Ever wonder why those bedouins in the desert carry water in a porous goat skin?

Nothing mysterious or even original here.



Off your high horse. This man is making something that will make a difference to a lot of peoples lifes... So yes it is original and news worthy...


Well said purplemer

PDUK



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 10:20 AM
link   
that storage device would be OK for my use...


about all my refrigerated tangerines by the sack can last is for 5 days in my refrigerator as the system draws out the moisture from the fruit & all i got is wrinkeled baseballs in a week.


will we be seeing this jug being on a TV infomercial, plus shipping & handling... any time soon?



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 11:27 AM
link   

Originally posted by malcr
DUH! Basic physics : evaporation causes cooling.

Have you never created a self cooling fridge when camping ?

Ever wonder why those bedouins in the desert carry water in a porous goat skin?

Nothing mysterious or even original here.



Im sure its used elsewhere, but here in Australia, out in the middle of nowhere, we used hessian (I believe) water bags. Hang them on the front of the tank (or car, bike, whatever) & even though water in jerry cans was too hot to touch, the water in the bag was nice & cold, & in no time at all. You just had to make sure you wet the outside also.

Very simple physics as you say, but so effective. Maybe these are the sorts of things that someone could make in a survival thread.



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 11:47 AM
link   
reply to post by asen_y2k
 


An interesting product for sure. Anything to help keep our footprint down is a good idea. But why not just skip a few decades back to the 40's and 50's where you'd have a guy come by every morning to drop off a block of ice you'd stow in the bottom of your fridge to keep your stuff cold?

I'd love to see a retro future infused with new tech and old ideas reinvented.



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 11:53 AM
link   
I don't think these will work in areas that have high humidity.

Here is more about zeer pots pot in pot refrigerator



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 11:54 AM
link   
reply to post by asen_y2k
 


Why don't we make buildings out of this material?



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 12:05 PM
link   
HUH? I can not believe this. this is old.
my grand had one of them!
you put water in it and put a bottle of milk in it.
just a pot jar that is poruses.
the water evaporates and cools the milk.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:27 AM
link   
reply to post by Pervius
 


Originally posted by Pervius
You can buy a Peltier module for like $15.

Plug a solar panel into it. It will cool your cooler. No electricity from the grid.

In the old days people used kerosene refrigerators. I think you can still buy them....everywhere's except the united states. Uses a simple stirling engine to chill the chiller. no electricity required.


Sterling Engines work fine for this.... Guess that's why they're rarely used these days lol... After all it's old tech and outright public domain tech... yet it's the solution to many a problem these days... STERLING ENGINES... Yes!!!!!!

Anyway.. lol Thanks for bringing up Sterling Engines!



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:29 AM
link   
reply to post by asen_y2k
 

I remember in WW2, they had refrigerators that would run on firewood. Everybody wants to pretend the newest and latest things are always the best. Good thread btw.



new topics

top topics



 
6

log in

join