Disturbing information about my ISP (Internet Service Provider)

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posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM
Now call me paranoid, but was I wrong to be alarmed at this information? Is there something to it? I do not want my emails being read by my ISP. I know the NSA does it without my consent already, but peons at my ISP having access? Them giving access to whoever they feel deserves it?

Sorry, I think this is a little bit intrusive. A little too "Big Brother". Has anyone else experienced this? Is this even legal?


Ok, you're paranoid.

Now that that's out of the way, it's the spec as of 2006. The IETF decided to change the way that the e-mail sender was resolved, and in doing so, redesignated the port for sender-resolved email origination to 587. Messages to port 587 allow the sender's id to be fully resolved, as opposed to port 25 outgoing email which may be relayed. Port 25 emails can be a source of spam which hides the true sender. So most places have closed port 25.

Note that they can read any unencrypted emails anyway, whether to port 25 or 587. That's got diddly to do with an ISP's ability to parse your email files. It's all about port-forwarded emails. Along with the 587 thing, you may have also noted that you can't send outgoing through other services' port 25 systems anymore as you once could. For instance, we get our incoming mail from godaddy, but the outgoing mail can't go that way without painful setup crap, so we receive mail from godaddy and send it through the ISP, because to send it through godaddy requires forwarding, unless you use their webapp.

Go look up RFC 4409. There you will find all your answers.




posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


I read thru a few posts and saw u didn't get a response (ISP probs maybe? j/k...)

I am a computer guy, once u have email set up u should NEVER have to change ports - otherwise I would have a lot more businesss.

Second, the person u talked to is full of a high school diploma (ha! take that mods!!!)

Third, what have u been doing other than ATS to make them take notice of u?

Oh and ATS thought police, feel free to remove this - others quote me.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by rktspc
 


This is the kind of info I know nothing about. The tech support guy made it sound rather unconventional. But still might be more to it than what you're saying??



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by I.C. Weiner
 


Perhaps, but he was correct in his suggestion to change ports.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


This is why I was asking for answers. Sometimes I actually get them.

Cheers.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by arcana_imperii
reply to post by SmoKeyHaZe
 


True. He was probably was drunk at the time, but he did threaten POTUS and sent the email to some people.

Not the best move on his part.


I know it's no laughing matter when alla sudden FBI come charging in because of some emails...

But I'm still laughing that your friend's friend would threaten somebody else with GBH in an email...Classic!

Can I ask why the emails were sent in the first place? What did the receiver have to do in order to cause this?

I could do with some more laughs, if that's ok!



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


It's standard for ISP's to block common ports for incoming traffic, such as 21, 80, and 25. They don't want you running mail servers, web servers, and ftp servers on your home account.

Surprised it ever worked for you.

What you do is have a service such a s DynDNS re-route to non-standard ports that aren't blocked. E.g. MX record points to DynDNS, they then forward to your email server with 10025 or something else.

No conspiracies or anything here....just business.

delius



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


So when we cannot access any websites, are they gonna say "change it from port 80 to port 102076"?

This is a crackers dream. "Yea, change ur ports...."



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by SmoKeyHaZe
 


Well the emails were about Obama, someone he hates, for reasons I know nothing about.
I guess he is unaware, or WAS unaware of the world we all live in.
He wanted to kill him I believe and sent angry emails to some of his friends, I don't know much more about it other than that.
edit on 6/24/2011 by arcana_imperii because: (no reason given)
edit on 6/24/2011 by arcana_imperii because: (no reason given)
edit on 6/24/2011 by arcana_imperii because: (no reason given)
edit on 6/24/2011 by arcana_imperii because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by arcana_imperii
 




Again, classic!
edit on 24-6-2011 by SmoKeyHaZe because:




posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by delius
 


My first impression was "ok, this new entity is doing things differently than Qwest", but then the tech guy from the hosting company got all spooky on me. That and there was NO notice from Qwest about the change.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM
reply to post by delius
 

That and there was NO notice from Qwest about the change.


We didn't get one either. One day the email system died, so after looking at the server, we called and asked. They said to go to a particular webpage, and there was the port 587 thing. That was some time back, two or three years ago.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by SmoKeyHaZe
 


Yeah it was a foolish thing for him to do.
But it does say something about email privacy. If that isn't a clear sign they are monitored I don't know what is.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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Oh, bwahahahhahahahahahahahhaha - I know too much to comment anymore on this thread. This is all wang-chunged (ha take that mods!) and if u have to change ports then it means the port they are listening on is no longer effective. Ur all hosed.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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I didn't dig to get more info but one of my long time email addresses was "compromised" recently, too.

I don't care enough to even figure it out right now. But I have felt that I'm being tracked since July 2009.



posted on Jun, 25 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


US is trying control the Internet, all these attacks, and how they are hyped up in the media, these are to cause the same nonsensical fear made in MSM, then you easily accept what ever reduction of freedom they implement on the Internet.

The same reason why Americans accept the reduction of their freedom in real world, now it is cyber world, and no one can do anything about it because most are still watching TV like Zombies frying their own brains out.



posted on Jun, 25 2011 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 





This is exactly what they are going to say to get a cybersecurity bill passed through legislation....


It'll be called the "Email Protection Act of 2011" but it'll have loads of cyber"security" related riders.



posted on Jun, 25 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 


I am not the most technical person but I have always thought that the internet is wide open...I mean I have always heard that something sent over the internet is subject to anyone's eyes that had the knowledge and time and desire to look at it ?

When we use cell phones anyone can listen in on a scanner so why would it be different for the internet ? i am not saying it is right but I do not send anything over the internet I would rather not someone else other than the person it is meant for to see it.

the use of encryption is not something I know how to do vut I have seen programs offered that will do it for you...but it seems to me if someone is selling it then someone knows how to unecrypt it if they so desire...not sure how it works so I don't know.

I suppose we could all start using our own code when using email where each person has the code book to decipher it then use off the shelf encryption programs to further muddy the waters and make them work a little harder to know whats in the email...then again I just might not send something through the internet that I do not want somebody else to see.



posted on Jun, 25 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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Sounds like your ISP had some mass marketing spam mailer problems through their port 25 so they asked you to change ports. All the commercial email encryption packages were required to register their products with NIST a few years back.

If you are paranoid that means the mail headers of those registered products would be used to flag the emails for closer scrutiny. You could write your own email client, and use a different channel to distribute the keys, but even commercially available Steganography packages aren't that stealthy.



posted on Jun, 25 2011 @ 10:39 AM
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Yeah, its like all those moaners on facebook, if you don't want anyone to know, don't put it on facebook, same with emails, the telephone, whatever, if its personal, keep it where it belongs, inside your skull.





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