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Cosmic structures way too big.

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posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:28 PM
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Giant cosmic structures in the Universe way "too big" to be compressed by traditional theories.
Measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation,the light emitted 370000years
after the Big Bang,reveal only very slight variations in density from place to place.

Gravity then amplified these variations into today's galaxy clusters,which are arranged into big
superclusters,with relatively empty voids in between.


www.newscientist.com...
edit on 23-6-2011 by Claudius because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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Image from the Article.


The article, from NewScientists.com, goes on to say
that a lot of the old theories are not matching the data,
and that the larger structures are 2x what the math predicts.

Nothing new here, but then

It goes on to say that



In otherwords...
no theory is working out right
the entire universe is up for grabs
and our own Xploders' posts about a bubble universe may right.


David Grouchy





Milkyway vs sunflower
edit on 23-6-2011 by davidgrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 10:00 PM
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Gravity is the strongest force of nature in the macro, the very genesis of magnetism/electricity. If things were ever 'evenly dispersed' we would not be here to debate EU vs E=MC2 would we?

We are here because of an imbalance, an imperfection. Nothing is perfect.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 10:13 PM
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The region we inhabit between the ionosphere, some 80km above us, and the surface of the Earth, is one of the rarest environments in the universe. We inhabit part of the .001% or less of the universe where plasma is not to be found naturally except in the lightning bolt and occasional aurora. Plasma has been termed ‘the fourth state of matter’ but in view of its ubiquity it would be better termed ‘the fundamental state of matter.’

It is a state where neutral atoms are mixed with charged particles, positive and negative. These particles may be as small as electrons and protons or may range up to the size of molecules and dust particles. In a gaseous plasma, like we find throughout the universe, the charged particles respond more strongly to electromagnetic forces than they do to mechanical or gravitational forces. One of the results we see in lightning is the constriction of electric currents to form long filaments. And the filamentary nature of plasma in space is well documented. No dark matter, sprinkled where required to save a theory, is necessary.

IMAGE


>> Survey of the nearby universe maps the distribution of about 75,000 galaxies (small blue dots). The placement of each galaxy in the radial direction is proportional to its distance from the Earth (which is located at the intersection of the two wedges), and its angular position (or right ascension in hours of arc) corresponds to its location along a thin strip in the sky. The galaxies clearly trace a network of filamentary structures.
Image courtesy of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey team.

The Electric Universe assumes that Nature is not wilfully hiding her secrets. The complexity we observe in the universe comes from very simple electrical principles, some of which can be tested with very simple apparatus. Science is open to everyone. The visible universe is an electrical phenomenon, from the structure of subatomic particles to the superclusters of galaxies in deep space



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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I seen a bit on TV about this. It seems that there is vast sections of space that is hundreds of million if not billions of years across that are totally empty, nothing there at all. No one can seem to explain those "voids". No current model or theory seem to fit. Things just keep getting weirder all the time.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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This info fits in with a thought I had about entropy. First; entropy: a measure of disorder in the universe or of the availability of the energy in a system to do work.
More info: en.wikipedia.org...
But what if the universe (system) is not being spread to disorder and disapation but instead is moving toward a state of organization that is too large and/or complex to be recognized? The implication being that it is a part of a much larger structure. Just a thought.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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I always have this underlying sense that what we perceive as "big" is actually quite small



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by yourmaker
I always have this underlying sense that what we perceive as "big" is actually quite small


Me too. Sorta like ants looking at the inside of the Grand Canyon from the river. They cannot even see above and over the cliff sides to whats related.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by davidgrouchy
 


I knew I had seen the pic in the article before,and its from this:

sprott.physics.wisc.edu...

As within so without maybe.

Never been a fan of the big bang theory-how did that happen with no time,space or matter?
Hmm



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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If some thing stood?
on an atom and look't out.
they could never guess what is around them?
a human! then a planet then ect ect ect.
it Never ends



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 06:59 AM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
Gravity is the strongest force of nature in the macro, the very genesis of magnetism/electricity. If things were ever 'evenly dispersed' we would not be here to debate EU vs E=MC2 would we?

We are here because of an imbalance, an imperfection. Nothing is perfect.


Apparently not, hence dark energy a mysterious force overpowering gravity.

Not that I buy that anyway, I'm a plasma guy myself.

It's the gravity only paradigm that appears to be broken.



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