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Needles

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posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 07:44 PM
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I had to have blood drawn today, and it did not hurt as much as it looked like it should. I was disappointed with the needle manufacturers.
edit on 23-6-2011 by Nosred because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


Hello

I draw blood as a profession and I am curious about your statement.

Why are you disapointed with the needle makers? It sounds like you wanted it to hurt more, surley not??



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:21 PM
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aww here here buddy ....






posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by _Highlander_
 


It's not that I wanted it to hurt more, I just thought that the needle manufacturers are missing a perfectly good opportunity for some sadism.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:52 PM
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It doesn't hurt at all if the person drawing the blood is good at their job. Be thankful



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:57 PM
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What kind of needle did they use?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


I thought perhaps that was the case. If you wish to be sadistic about it you could ask for a bigger needle!

Or you could have your blood collected through this device ;



This devise uses around( if memory serves) 60 lbs of pressure to punch through your sternum using 10 or so 14 gauge needles.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by Lysergic
 


Not sure.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


Did he died?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by Lysergic
 


Yes I did die, sadly.
edit on 23-6-2011 by Nosred because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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But seriously, when I pulled the band-aid off there wasn't even any blood. What the hell? Don't you guys know how to make a needle?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


There was not any blood because it clotted, which is your body doing that, not the needles fault.

Good luck with the darwin awards!



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by _Highlander_
 


You mean it clotted instantly in the milliseconds it took to pull out the needle and put on the band-aid?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 



You said when you pulled the band aid off there was no blood? If the bandaid was on then even a moment or two is enough for the hole to clot. If you are refering to when the needle was taken out, in which case it can clot instantly, but more commonly it requires a little pressure to seal the hole so the clot can form.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by Nosred
 


Be thankful it didnt hurt. Every time I have a blood draw I go through He77. I have "deep rolling" veins or so I am told, so they poke and poke and dig and dig until I am bruised. I always tell them I am a hard stick and to please use my hand and they wont. They usually go through the vein then move to the other arm where they proceed to poke and poke and dig and dig and give up. Then they go to my hand.

I wish we could trade veins. It sounds like you might enjoy the blood and bruises. Me, on the other hand, would take your experience any time.

Stop complaining about a good thing silly!



posted on Jun, 27 2011 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by k21968
 


Rolling veins..haha...that's shop talk for 'I did not achor the vein properly and I missed but lets blame it on the patient'

In order for a vein to not 'roll' it must be anchored. Next time a phlebotomist misses your vein and blames it on a 'rolling vein' ask them if they anchored it before inserting the needle. They can be slippery littles suckers, but as long as you use your finger to anchor the vein, it will not move or 'roll'.

If you have hard to access veins, drink plenty of water, I usually recomend at least 600 ml 1 hour before a patient walks in if they are hard to access. That is one of the best things you as a patient can do to help a phlebotomist find your vein. Also you CAN drink water when the test has indicated fasting, my pet annoyance is when patients come in fasting, they know they are hard to access and should drink water, but they don't.

They phebotomist should take the blood from where ever you desire IF there is an accessable vein. It is your body and they are at your service. Some might be annoyed that you are telling them their job, but the way I look at it is if a patient asks to me stick somewhere where I would not normally go, I comply(if I can find a vein that is). If it works, great, if not, well...it was at their request.




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