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1976 Tribe on Papua New Guinea meets white man for the first time. BEST VIDEO IVE SEEN IN A LONG TIM

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posted on Jul, 20 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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Everything I've ever learned in Canadian classes regarding America history made it quite clear than American explorers and settlers at least incited the hostilities with the natives. Just look at the doctrine of "Manifest Destiny".




posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 02:42 AM
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I just wanted to add, that whatever the "truth" of the clip, the song is called Yeha Noha by Sacred Spirit.
edit on 28-7-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2011 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Okay... I've read through a good chunk of this thread and I keep seeing comments like this. Know what it reminds me of?

The notion in the US and Canada that one can't "really" be an Indian unless you're "authentic" - that is, you can't be an Indian if you live off the rez, wear socks, and don't have feathers in your hair.

Basically there's the expectation that we need to freeze-frame our lives in a past time period, as determined by other people so that THEY can enjoy seeing us be "authentic" like a museum peice or something.

"Oh, don't give them nutritious food, better tools, medicine, and a sense of a larger world, you'll just mess up their 'pure' culture!" strikes me as the most selfish, paternalist load of horse crap anyone could ever say. You want them to keep scraping dirt for grubs and dying of malaria because YOU think it's cool that they are so "primitive."

Trust me folks, if people didn't want to have machetes, cell phones, and razors... we wouldn't use them. Just like how if you guys didn't want corn, hygiene, and rhythm, you wouldn't use them. We don't useholy wars, you don't use headhunting... see?

Cultures are not "corrupted." There is no moment of "pristine" - a culture is always growing and changing and interacting with other cultures it meets, trading and discarding and developing ideas, tools, notions, and ways of doing things.



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by TheWalkingFox
 



The notion in the US and Canada that one can't "really" be an Indian unless you're "authentic" - that is, you can't be an Indian if you live off the rez, wear socks, and don't have feathers in your hair.


I can agree on that part but did it stay with friendly trading back in the old days ? think not , if the Indians had a fair chance of evolving on their own their would be a very spiritual and maybe a significant change in this future and we probably would have learn-th great things we now have lost due to wars with the natives. I know you cant compare this documentary with the native indians, because we live in different times but do you think these people need cellphones and color TV ? you know if they had gold in their village they probably would have died a long time ago.
edit on 21/12/2010 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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translate.google.com... es-hommes-blancs-210642



posted on Jul, 29 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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edit on 29-7-2011 by DisturbedToo because: whoops...accident



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 05:13 AM
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Lost in translation. A British TV company faked scenes and mistranslated quotes from an Amazonian tribe to make them look 'savage' and 'sex-obsessed', anthropologists claim.

We all know what the media is like in the west, so it wouldn't surprise me if there was some truth to this article, then again it's the Daily Mail who aren't exactly renown for their truth and honesty. Can't find the source, so who do you believe?
Absolutely disgraceful if true, but what's new, considering we've had to put up with this crap for most of our lives.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

www.guardian.co.uk...
www.mediaite.com...
www.aaanet.org...



posted on Aug, 5 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by halfoldman
I just wanted to add, that whatever the "truth" of the clip, the song is called Yeha Noha by Sacred Spirit.
edit on 28-7-2011 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)


Many thanks for that information.



posted on Nov, 3 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: DisturbedToo

Wow.



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 12:01 AM
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Like People You See In A Dream

this book details a narrative from a 1930's expedition to PNG, and then many years later catches up with the original PNG folk who then contribute their side of the experience. Really shows just how far apart explorers can be from what they are perceiving in others, and vice versa.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: DisturbedToo

That look straight into the camera, like looking directly at me. Awesome experience!



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 12:15 PM
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Two points of interest from the video:

They were carrying stone tools which speaks of no contact but one of the men had two belts of cowrie shell money around his chest.That implies some contact with the coast. Remarkably they resemble the cowrie belt money made by the British in the early 19th century and also used by Chinese. A cowrie shell was worth about 1/7000 of an ounce of silver and are still considered a medium of exchange in PNG.

That might mean a contact perhaps generations ago for them by a native coming up from the coast.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune
Two points of interest from the video:

They were carrying stone tools which speaks of no contact but one of the men had two belts of cowrie shell money around his chest.That implies some contact with the coast. Remarkably they resemble the cowrie belt money made by the British in the early 19th century and also used by Chinese. A cowrie shell was worth about 1/7000 of an ounce of silver and are still considered a medium of exchange in PNG.

That might mean a contact perhaps generations ago for them by a native coming up from the coast.


Good observations Hans,
I've seen a documentary by a British film maker who lived with a highland PNG family, that still lived a very tradition lifestyle. The man kept a sacred family heirloom, a half dozen cowrie shells . As he told it they have been handed down for generations, since they were driven from the coast by the " newly arrived asiatics". I would imagine that these "Asiatics" were austronesians, if that is the case then that puts the timing arcs minimum of 3k years ago. He stated that the coast was more than a two week hike each way, and he had made the trip only once when he was a young man.
And since he had to pass through the territory of several un related clans it was a very dangerous journey, as he didn't have enough cowrie shells to pay tolls, and some clans would kill you on the spot, and the Asian would just kill you and eat you as they were practicing cannibals.
It was a fascinating doc,



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

An ancestor of my wife wrote in his journal about encountering the remains of the 'cowrie farms' that were used by the Honourable East India Company to grow money for the African trade. The traditional spots to do so were destroyed when the British transformed 7 separate islands into the one island which the city of Mumbai (Bombay) now stands (1830's).





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