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To graduate or not to graduate... is there an option?

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posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by grey580
I always feel that kids are missing out by not doing the whole high school experience.
Everyone i know that gets their good enough diploma always feel regret at dropping out.

School and education in general opens up doors to opportunities later in life.
You shouldn't pass up on this opportunity.


I don't regret dropping out. at all




posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 


PS - After my last long winded post let me try to keep this short, in regards to your comment about things are different now than they were then, you're absolutely right

when I was in school all the girls dressed like Madonna (thats corsets and fishnets for those who are 80's challenged) - and our favorite songs were anything that included curse words or anarchy

Things are definitely not like that now, at least in my area

Uniforms are now standard in that school (and all other local school districts)

I'm not a wordly person I can only say what happens here, at home. I'm secluded in my little corner of the world where teenagers have respect (at least for me..), and don't feel a need to use foul language even if I do, and they've always been allowed to use curse words in times they felt were appropriate

Again I say, take away the novelty and they choose not to (and when they do use it, make them explain why they think it was appropriate, then offer other suggestions of words they could've used instead)


Although I must admit, the music has changed A LOT - had this song stuck in my head FOREVER because the kid had it on repeat - I had no idea it was even a real song - I thought it was something playing along with a video game (reminds me of the first time I heard Paradise by the Dashboard Light and asked about halfway through "is this still the same song?")
WARNING: Explicit visuals, lyrics, EVERYTHINGS - since it came to me through a 14 year old I figure its ok to post here - if not - I accept the Mod edit as tyranny!! but with a smile




posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by Forevever
 





The 19 year old is totally anti-social, just really has absolutely no interest in going anywhere to meet anyone or join in anything - I wasn't the least bit surprised when he blew off his graduation ceremony - thats just who he is - and lord help me if the 19 year old ever did anything wrong - I would not have the first clue how to punish him - since his favorite activity is to READ a book


Some kids are like that. It could be because he's shy or maybe he feels awkward trying to make conversations with strangers. My son has a difficult time talking to people he doesn't know. I was a little like that, but eventually overtime I opened up.

He's not the only one that didn't go to his graduation ceremony.
When I graduated from college I jumped in my car and had them mail me my diploma. Graduation ceremonies can be quite boring.

It's a good sign your son likes to read. Every student I've ever taught who read novels or books in my class were very intelligent!




Discussion is key, not just talking either, you have to ask a zillion questions and LISTEN to the responses and discuss them all.


I agree, and the manner in which you discuss it can mean a world of difference. I found my son wouldn't give me a hard time doing things if I asked him calmly instead of barking at him. I had to change because when my mother was upset about something, she would always yell at me when she wanted things done. Sometimes you just have to try to break those learned behaviors.




One of the most important things I think I ever told mine, was that I made these mistakes so that you didn't have to - but its still your choice and if you choose to do wrong, the consequences are yours.


Kids will do what they want to do. They live for the day and can't see down the road. All you can do is try to lead them in the right direction.




I tend to believe giving kids a certain amount of freedom, and control over their own lives, makes them more likely to give it a lot of thought before making a choice.


Absolutely, I've seen students who came from very strict families that rebelled and ended up getting into drugs and changing their behavior for the worse. You have to ask yourself, is it better to ground your kid for coming home an hour late or ground him for more serious things like stealing.




In the end, he's 17 - there's not much I can do about it if he wants to quit - I'm going to have to try to understand his choice (even though I already do), BUT before I let him make that decision, I need to hear both sides - my side is pretty clear... convincing him otherwise is going to be near impossible


If you tried to talk some sense into him and he just doesn't want to be convinced, there really isn't much you can do. If you force him to stay in school, chances are he will just not do anything and fail his classes. Like you said, make it clear to him there are consequences to his decisions. I would definitely have him think about a technical career and possibly enrolling himself into a technical school when he's ready. In the mean time, he should understand he has to get a full-time job and pay for his own expenses.




I'm sorry to see this thread didn't get more attention but I'm happy to see there are at least some who can agree that furthering your education is a good way, but not the only way


I get frustrated when counselors push every student to go on to college. Most teachers know not all students can handle college. Everyone learns differently. If someone is a hands-on learner, they should be directed toward a technical school. Some students just are not ready to decide what they want to do in life. Sometimes it's better for students to go directly into the work force until they can really come to grips on what they want to do.

Personally, I think the educational system in the United States is all wrong. Every high school should be a technical school. It gives kids a chance to see what type of careers they're interested in. It also gives them a technical skill they can fall back on. All academic high schools really don't give kids any marketable skills if they decide not to go on to college.

What a lot of people don't understand, is that technical high schools not only gives students a skill they can use to get a higher paying job straight out of high school, but it also helps them if they pursue a related college degree. They end up learning a lot of the terminology they will need to learn in their first year of college.

CAD/Machining/Automotive Repair - Engineering Fields
Nursing or Medical Assistant - Medical Fields
Dental Assistant - Dentistry
Electronics - Electrical Engineer
CAD/Carpentry/Electricity - Architecture

Good Luck, you sound like you're a very involved parent. Sometimes things are just out of your hands and there isn't much you can do to change them. I've had kids who have dropped out of school and made something of their lives. On the other hand, I've had students I expected to someday become very successful, and I run into them later in life working in a mall somewhere.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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Originally posted by Forevever
Hopefully no one will mind my starting up a new thread on this topic. Doing a search, the closest I could come up with was in 2009 and it really doesn't address my situation.

So my 17 year old comes to me and tells me he'll be looking for a job this summer. If he can find anything reasonable that he likes, he does not want to return to school in the fall, but would rather take his GED.

His points are pretty valid.

He has no intention of being any kind of professional that college would be required.
He is better use to the family if he's bringing money into the house - even at minimum wage
He told me that he needed to take summer school to make up 2 credits he lost (for absenses) and that would cost $185 per class (which no one has), and if he doesn't take these classes he'll be held back as a sophmore... and he "really can't take 3 more years"
If and when he decides he wants to go into a specific field, there's always time (maybe? he doesn't read ATS)

The mother side of me started screaming (inside my head), "YOU HAVE TO GO, YOU HAVE NO CHOICE!!" but I stopped myself before I actually said it cause its not true - he has a choice. And if the words did come out of my mouth, I'd be lying, I don't agree with them. So I told him to go back to his room. For now he's grounded until I figure out how to deal with it.

I quit highschool when I was 17, also facing a 2nd attempt at sophmore year - both my son and I failed for the same reason - missed too many days... neither of us wanted to be there, in that environment with those people for no logical reason.

I immediately got my GED and set about raising my first child (born when I was 18, who actually did graduate this year but has no desire to continue education). While starting the family, I went on to take medical transcription courses - which I graduated from, and NEVER worked as a transcriptionist... though learning to touch type and reaching the 100+ wpm was totally worth it, "talk to type" be damned

For the majority of my working life, I ended up in administrative type positions (including but not limited to Medical, HVAC, Auto Body, Repossession, and various aspects of Wholesale and Retail), until I started my own wholesale business - that went well for several years, but then I decided I didnt feel like stressing all the time and working 15 hour days - so I decided to close the business and go back to work, specifically in search for the job that would produce the least amount of responsibility for the maximum amount of pay (that was the walmart years LOL and yes I made good money at walmart - I don't care what people tell you)

Due to declining health and some other stressful factors, I left that position

Now, had I finished high school and went to college and got all caught up in a career - I would not be any better off today - I'd still be in constant pain - I'd still be out of work - and I'd still be proud of what I accomplished

I know that NOT going to school makes me less "knowledgable" on some subjects, but thankfully I live in the age of the internet - I can study what I want - for fun - I don't need to profit financially to be happy - in my entire work history and experience I learned that only other people are made happy by my so-called financial stability - only OTHER people are impressed with letters like MD and PHD and WTF

My best friend did the same thing I did at the same time I did it, except she actually did graduate from high school - with her diploma and my GED we both got the same degree in medical terminology/transcription - we both took a job right out of that school and SHE has been with the same company now for 17 years - since I never been fired - I could easily have stayed with the same company for 17 years also - and most importantly..
SHE'S NO HAPPIER THAN I AM

And straight up, my mother is working on her 3rd career - She graduated high school and went first into the military - she left the military to have me and took nursing classes and became a psychiatric nurse - she was forced into early retirement in her mid 40's when the state hospital was closed, and then SHE went to the same school my best friend and I went to for medical transcription and has been been running pawn shops for like the last 15 years or something - so its not like there isn't time to do something else - she's living proof you can change your career at any age - AND SHE'S NO HAPPIER THAN I AM EITHER

What was my point again?

Oh yeah - How can I convince my 17 year old to stay in school when I don't believe its the best thing for everyone?

On ATS people often argue about things we've been "brainwashed" to do since birth, conform to society standards, isn't it at all possible that 12 years of school is one of those things they POUNDED into our brains that WE HAVE TO do - but in reality .....I keep remembering the scene from Dangerous Minds when Michelle Pfeiffer went to see the mom to find out why her kids didnt come to school and the mom says "I ain't raising no doctors and lawyers here. They got bills to pay." Is it possible that 12 years is just too many for your average, everyday ordinary Joe? Its not like he's the only one, I wasn't the only one

Anyway, thoughts on this issue are much appreciated. Its really hard for me to have an unbias discussion on this matter.... I would've LOVED to raise career minded children - but its just not going to happen. They are who they are, just like I am who I am....

As I previously mentioned, my 19 year old did graduate this year, and is not even interested in it - totally refused to walk - didn't want any parts of the ceremony - why? "cause its boring"....
edit on 21-6-2011 by Forevever because: I could not possibly type all that without finding at least one mistake!!


Im 19 years old as of February and today I went to my school to get my diploma. Im Forrest and I graduated from Forest High School, just like I wanted. I was supposed to graduate last June, but I was missing 10 credits and made that up in 8 months from Florida Virtual School and another program my school offered. I understand that your teen may not want to graduate and would rather get his GED. I was in that position in 10th grade, skippin school with my friend and my girlfriend and smoking all day
. Either way, I regretted it badly, because I had to make up 10 credits in 8 months when most have to get 6 or less. I put my mind to it and told everyone "Im not getting my GED, I will get my diploma, be sure of that." Here I am today with it finally.

Things are getting harder, and it would be much better to have a high school diploma rather than a GED. I've been wanting to join the Army for many years and my brother is a recruiter, and they are no longer accepting GED's, so thank god I didn't get one. He will still be able to do certain things, and a GED does not make you less intelligent than anyone else. It's just the gratitude of receiving it. You say he is only missing 2 credits, my friend Jeff was also missing 2 credits as well as graduated this year and I thought to myself "It took you 9 months to get 2 credits when I made up 10 in 8?" No disrespect, but if I can put my mind to it and get 10 in months your son can get those two credits, pay attention, and graduate. This is coming from a kid who skipped school the first 3 weeks of 11th grade, got high, and eventually got pulled out from my mother. Yet I came back and did what I needed to do. I wish I could give your son the inspiration to do what I did, because it is definetely in reach. I know it's hard with a teen, because im still a 19 year old. I gave my mother hell, and when she pulled me out we got into the worst fights ever, cursing eachother out and all. Yet, since then we've been great and now that i've graduated she is even happier 2 out of her 3 kids had graduated. I would just suggest you incourage your son in some way or form, and tell him he truly can do it, especially if there are people like me who have went against the odds and completed. It is not difficult, and I acutally love learning more than ever, and want to possibly get into astronomy or another type of science after the military, depending on the circumstances.

Im not sure if you have an online school service where you live, but that would help alot. It helped me alot because I hated going to school. I had friends throughout 9th and 10th grade until I just started being myself and falling out of the "scenes" that you see everyday in high school. In these rough times, if you want to truly be something, a high school diploma is becoming a minimum requirement. The GED is starting to become nothing. Maybe im wrong, but when the Army doesn't even want GED's, than you know things are getting tough.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by FPB214
 

As a side note, my kids will never join the military.
Their choice, my influence


Actually the $185 per course was online - 2 courses he'd have to take this summer and 2 more courses next summer - he's failed 4 classes this year

Basically at the time of graduation he will be 4 credits behind - no one has the $185 for one course, much less 4, the only way for him to make it up without spending any money is to be kept back a year - that puts him in 10th grade again, and 2 years behind his friends (he failed 7th)

I also agree that 4 credits doesn't seem like much, when they're the last 4....
When you're looking at another 2 or 3 years.. and you're only 17.... remember how long 2 and 3 years took to go by when you were 17?

You do make good points that got me thinking for the other side.

Maybe the school can let him go back as a Junior, and we'll see if we can make up the credits at the end of Senior year - that would at least bring it down to 2 years - and after 2 years we can easily push him to just get it done with only 4 credits left, right? And maybe one of the reasons he's pushing to quit is because he doesn't want to be left behind and watch his friends move on.... if he can move on with them, then just hang around another year AFTER if necessary - fail him senior year or something... I'm totally calling his guidance counselor and asking if we can do this.

I love it!

See, its all about presentation!!!

I'm just worried he'll come back with "where's the money in that?"

I think he's up, I'm going to ask him what he thinks
--------------------15 minutes later-------------------

I brought up all your good points
His reasoning....
People dont pay him to go to school.
When he does work in school, those papers go into the trash, they mean nothing.
When he does work at a job, his product goes somewhere, has a purpose
And he gets paid.

I don't know how to argue with that....
so I left it, again, with "we can't even discuss this until you actually have a job" and a complete understanding if he doesn't have a job, he does not have my blessing - and after our discussion, I think that might be enough... but I don't want to use "mom guilt" to force him to go - if I can avoid it

I also warned him that we'll talk about it again and we'll talk about it again, and again, and again


Most important I guess at this point is that he understands he has to do SOMETHING

(clicking reply without re-reading or I'll be tweaking this post all night, forgive any errors ♥)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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Like to know what some of these degrees are that some received in college, that was a waste of time.
I have had 2 kids get their degrees one started out at $85,000 and I think is up around $100,000 2 years later.
another that is in Grad school now and she works in her field full time and makes $65,000.

Now I never went any farther then high school, and for the last 26 years worked 4 hours 5 days a week
and even back in the 80's made a grand a week and up until I sold my route last year was making $2,500 a week
with the same 20-25 hours a week. Now I work for cash and pick the weeks I want to work

High school and college is very important, just don't waste it on a bogus degree


edit on 22-6-2011 by Meatman because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-6-2011 by Meatman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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Getting a GED doesn't close the college door.

For many 2yr colleges, you can get in with a GED, and then once you have a well-credited 2 yr degree, you can then go on for a Bachelor's, etc. I personally graduated (with honors) from High School, but I had classmates who didn't.

I know this, that even though I don't use what I learned during my degrees, in my current job, I wouldn't have even had my resume LOOKED at without at least a 4yr degree.

I actually have an MBA, but these days, that can overqualify me, so I often leave it off the resume (depending on position)...though I'm at least stable where I am now.

A diploma is preferable, but to be honest, the kid may have to just do what he has to do.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Forget the Marine Biologist crap--it's a diversion. The fact is that the more education you have, the higher your earnings will be. Maybe he'll luck out and beat the odds, but statistically speaking, he won't. I also do not think the fact that he might get a job and therefore bring money into the home is a very sound reason. Surely the kid is not going to want to live with Mommy forever! Sounds to me like the kids are not very motivated and it also sounds like it's a family pattern. No problem, but I'd hate to see anyone go on the public dole just because working was "too boring." As long as he can support himself and as long as he doesn't blame everyone else for his lack of success, go ahead.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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Another thing to assess is the kid's inclinations though. There are still some trades where a diploma isn't needed, but some big bucks can be realized... Construction, Truck Driving, repair trades, etc.

Of course, the above poster is right, statistically, those with more education make more money in their lifetime.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
Another thing to assess is the kid's inclinations though. There are still some trades where a diploma isn't needed, but some big bucks can be realized... Construction, Truck Driving, repair trades, etc.

Of course, the above poster is right, statistically, those with more education make more money in their lifetime.


I hadn't responded to Shuyler because I'm not sure the best way to word this without clouding the issue further, and I really don't want to go back to the Marine Biologist comparison .... but here goes

-------------
I won't take offense to my "lack of motivation" cause you're absolutely right, I'm almost never motivated to do anything I find pointless - and don't think it doesn't worry me that I see this pattern in my kids - otherwise I wouldn't be here discussing it
HOWEVER, I know who I am, I know where I been, I know what I've learned, and I have no regrets - I don't think that following in my footsteps is such a horrible thing - just because I preferred to have what some might consider "menial" jobs, doesn't make them any less successful - and believe me after 3 years of running my own business - I was all for going back to 9 to 5.
As far as I'm concerned I've been successful in all my endeavors. If it wasn't for the chronic pain and crooked bones I'd still be out there making marks on people.

Since it appears in context that you define "success" by the amount of money someone makes....
I'd like to try taking money completely off the table - to me its prejudice to the issue at hand

People can be successful and not make a lot of money - people can make a lot of money and not be successful

So what do you say? We take out the money factor ALTOGETHER

Lets say he's already set for life - he can do anything he wants, he can afford it.

If you were a multi-millionaire at the age of 17, what would you do?
Would you want to stay in high school until you were 20? or buy a plane ticket around the world?

Couldn't you just be successful in life?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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But you said before that his reasons for not going to school are to make money. He can take money now and potentially make less later...or wait and go to school for a larger payout later in life...potentially.

I do understand where he is coming from. He is 17 and going back as a sophmore. That is hard for me to even fathom.I think a great option would be GED and if he decides later that he wants to go to college then he can go to a community college. In Texas, an associates degree from a state community college gets you automatic acceptance into any of the public four year colleges and universities in the state. I'm not sure if that is an option where you live, but it could be worth checking out. That way if he changes his mind and wants to go to school, he can still have a way into college.

I would like to think that college always equals success, but these days that is not always the case, but I hope he is able to make the best decision for him. If he decides to get his GED and go directly into the workforce, he (and you as his mother) may be criticized, but if he finds that illusive happines then it will be all worth it.

Best of luck to you all.

Ax



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by Abrihetx
 

I completely agree with everything you just said.
We all live many lives before we die
There is always time for him to further his education if he chooses to do that - with a GED

I do just want to clarify what I thought he meant by this

People dont pay him to go to school.
When he does work in school, those papers go into the trash, they mean nothing.
When he does work at a job, his product goes somewhere, has a purpose
And he gets paid.

It started with money and ended with money
but it was full of purpose

Its like the money was a bonus

His point, to me, is that he feels like he's wasting his time.
Because really, its not about the money.

Life should never be about the money...

For me, all logic says this will be a good learning experience in itself. I should just support his choice, I consider him mature, responsible, intelligent, and while I will force him to think about it some more - I know in my heart he's been struggling with it for a while.

I guess we all see the same thing though
Wasted potential - it makes us scream inside NOOOOO you have to do MORE!!!

I'm desperately trying to justify that voice, and I can't.
How do you make someone be more than they want to be?
What if more makes them unhappy?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by Forevever
 


Well $185 a course is horrible. In Florida I did all my online schooling for free, no charge. I think Florida's virtual school system is actually one of the best in the nation. So I got lucky, because if I would have to pay almost $200 just to do one course I would have been in a ditch as well.

It would help if he had a job though, because at least he is only behind 4 credits. So then he could pitch in as well for the courses. So if he makes up 2 credits in summer school, does that cost money as well? If not i'd do it, try hard to find a job and make enough money to pay for or pitch in for the last 2 credits online. In my high school, no matter what you failed and no matter how many credits you were missing, you went on to the next grade level regardless. I don't know if his is the same? Either way, I know what he means about the money thing. I somewhat had the same thought process, but like I said I actually enjoyed learning and still do. If you truly don't care, and are thinking more about getting payed from having a job and the true will to finish school is not there, it is going to be difficult. It needs to come down to his goals and what is best for him, his friends shouldn't be what he is worried about. If his school will hold him back instead of letting him move on and make up the credits like my school does, then it would suck to have your friends be in a grade ahead of you or two, but it needs to come down to his future. His friends will still be there.

Also is he going into 11th or 12th this year? If he is going into 12th and he can get 2 credits in summer school, then if he can get the money he can make up the other 2 credits as well as finishing his senior year. Even if he had to go back for part of a senior year, that wouldn't be bad. In my school, we had to get 6 credits a year, 3 each semester. So say he has to go back after he was supposed to graduate senior year, he should only have to go back another single semester to make up 2 credits if our schools our somewhat alike. Anyways, like I said if his mind just isn't set on getting his diploma and he'd rather get his GED, then he can do that and still go find a good paying job. Just hope he doesn't regret it later in life like some do.

I remember thinking about getting a GED and saying how I just really didn't care about the rest of high school because it didn't matter, but I feel so much better now that I have actually completed 24 credits even after having to do school work another 8 months after I was supposed to graduate. I knew friends who dropped out in 10-12 grade and got their GED, and I can bet I feel better than them just because you know you didn't take the easy way out, you know you put your mind to it and got it completed regardless of the bumps in the road. I told myself that I didn't come this far and stay in school since I was a child to not fully complete it.

So hopefully he decides to get his High School Diploma and just get it done with since he has been in school practically all his life, and is really not in bad shape as of now unless he fails more classes. If he has to go back another semester which is about 4 months or so, then do it. If he truly doesn't care and want's to get a job and a GED, well then hopefully that works out for him as well. I know the position your in, my mom was in the same position when I was going through practically the same thing. As long as he's happy with his decision.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by Jepic
 


I was bored so I did the Googling.


Marine Biologist - Location is key!

Plumber - Promotions are key!
edit on 23-6-2011 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2011 @ 03:35 AM
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reply to post by FPB214
 


Thanks so much for replying - I briefly lost track of the thread, sorry for my delay.

We've been having an ongoing dialogue (my son and I) and we're going to be looking into whats available as far as virtual school - from what he tells me - his high school does offer something like that - I just need to find out what it costs - if it will get him to graduate, I'm all for it - if I have to scrape up the dough, I'll find it.

In spite of my own logic and arguments, I really would like to see both my boys graduate (and one down, one to go)

Assuming he doesn't screw up the next 2 years, then he's only shy 4 credits - (I believe that amounts to just over half a year, 7 credits a year, 28 to graduate) - my oldest had pnuemonia for 2 months in his senior year, so he was behind 2 credits, he easily made those up and graduated.

I don't think the 17 year old is sure what he really wants to do. He's made it perfectly clear that I can use "mom guilt" to get him to go - he said he will go - FOR ME
.... I really rather he go for himself. Him saying he wants to work seemed like he was trying to make it an easier pill to swallow, since he says he plans to work whether he goes to school or not..

Anyway, its all up in the air, and I guess there won't be a rock solid resolution till we get closer to game time (August)

I don't think getting a GED is taking the easy way out in a negative sense. For me it was mostly stress related - I really couldn't physically force myself to return to that place - it had everything to do with the people, not the work involved - so yeah getting my GED was easier, but it was also healthier IMHO - he doesn't seem to fall into this category though - but I might be wrong - maybe he really just thinks its pointless

reply to post by Wookiep
 


Thank you wookie
I also did some googling
Famous Millionaire Dropouts
I wonder if the guy who wrote the article dropped out - his first GIANT word is WEATHER instead of WHETHER


The List (without the details)
Quentin Tarantino - Dave Thomas (the wendy's guy) - Johnny Depp - Nicholas Cage - Christina Aguilera - Jim Carrey - John Travolta - Chris Rock - Tom Petty - Joe Pesci


 

My original message seems to have somehow gotten lost, or I failed at bringing it to light. This article appears to touch on it briefly.

What I want to know is WHY 12 years? WHY credits?
Why not an age limit? I like that idea
Suppose everyone graduates at the age of 18 (since they can vote, why not) and is given a scoring for their overall performance - like a credit score.
For example, someone who completed all their work, had great attendance, got all A's would graduate with say a score of 1200 (100 per year, just making this up as I go), and I personally would've graduated with a score of 1000 (meaning I made it through 10 years and did well) then subtract points for specific infractions like.. minus 2 points for every day you're absent, half a point if you're late, etc etc

The bottom line is if he messes up intentionally, or something unforeseen makes him miss too many days (like the oldest had pnuemonia)..... he won't graduate till he turns 21 - and I think there is an age limit in this high school says you can't be 21 as a senior.. I could be wrong - but I don't think I'd want to send my kid to a school with 21 year olds....

if I'm not making any sense, feel free to disregard me
its a little late



posted on Jun, 26 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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He's a teenager, it's his choice. If he doesn't want to college, you can't make him.



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by Forevever
reply to post by FPB214
 


Thanks so much for replying - I briefly lost track of the thread, sorry for my delay.

We've been having an ongoing dialogue (my son and I) and we're going to be looking into whats available as far as virtual school - from what he tells me - his high school does offer something like that - I just need to find out what it costs - if it will get him to graduate, I'm all for it - if I have to scrape up the dough, I'll find it.

In spite of my own logic and arguments, I really would like to see both my boys graduate (and one down, one to go)

Assuming he doesn't screw up the next 2 years, then he's only shy 4 credits - (I believe that amounts to just over half a year, 7 credits a year, 28 to graduate) - my oldest had pnuemonia for 2 months in his senior year, so he was behind 2 credits, he easily made those up and graduated.

I don't think the 17 year old is sure what he really wants to do. He's made it perfectly clear that I can use "mom guilt" to get him to go - he said he will go - FOR ME
.... I really rather he go for himself. Him saying he wants to work seemed like he was trying to make it an easier pill to swallow, since he says he plans to work whether he goes to school or not..

Anyway, its all up in the air, and I guess there won't be a rock solid resolution till we get closer to game time (August)

I don't think getting a GED is taking the easy way out in a negative sense. For me it was mostly stress related - I really couldn't physically force myself to return to that place - it had everything to do with the people, not the work involved - so yeah getting my GED was easier, but it was also healthier IMHO - he doesn't seem to fall into this category though - but I might be wrong - maybe he really just thinks its pointless

reply to post by Wookiep
 


Thank you wookie
I also did some googling
Famous Millionaire Dropouts
I wonder if the guy who wrote the article dropped out - his first GIANT word is WEATHER instead of WHETHER


The List (without the details)
Quentin Tarantino - Dave Thomas (the wendy's guy) - Johnny Depp - Nicholas Cage - Christina Aguilera - Jim Carrey - John Travolta - Chris Rock - Tom Petty - Joe Pesci


 

My original message seems to have somehow gotten lost, or I failed at bringing it to light. This article appears to touch on it briefly.

What I want to know is WHY 12 years? WHY credits?
Why not an age limit? I like that idea
Suppose everyone graduates at the age of 18 (since they can vote, why not) and is given a scoring for their overall performance - like a credit score.
For example, someone who completed all their work, had great attendance, got all A's would graduate with say a score of 1200 (100 per year, just making this up as I go), and I personally would've graduated with a score of 1000 (meaning I made it through 10 years and did well) then subtract points for specific infractions like.. minus 2 points for every day you're absent, half a point if you're late, etc etc

The bottom line is if he messes up intentionally, or something unforeseen makes him miss too many days (like the oldest had pnuemonia)..... he won't graduate till he turns 21 - and I think there is an age limit in this high school says you can't be 21 as a senior.. I could be wrong - but I don't think I'd want to send my kid to a school with 21 year olds....

if I'm not making any sense, feel free to disregard me
its a little late


If your oldest one can do it in his senior year then the 17 year old can, it will just take a little extra time. But like you said, he's not sure what he wants to do. The best thing you can do I suppose is just let him do what he feels is best for him. If he gets his GED, he should start working soon. I can't talk too much because I myself have had only one job for about half a year, but the city I live in in FL is horrible with jobs. I apply and never get a response, not that it bothers me because I should be joining the Army in the next couple months here to start making real money and living a real life.

As for the GED being an easy way out, I know what you mean. Some just have problems that result in them just getting thier GED. I was just talking about more of those who drop out just because they don't feel like doing the work. I've had some friends who aren't missing credits who just drop out for the hell of it, that's just stupid.

Good luck, hope you two can possibly work something out with the school or he can do what he feels is best for him.



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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Wanted to update for those who might wonder


Turns out times really are changing. My school district has implemented a "cyber" option. You no longer have to go to the building to get your diploma, you can do it from home.

I don't know how trustworthy the information is, but the guidance counselor told me they set this up because of students withdrawing from classes to do online studies through other venues. He told me everytime they do that, the school district has to pay the online school a chunk of money.

I personally think its a good idea, simply because people are different.
Plus if we get people out of the building, then the classes become smaller, and the teacher can pay more attention to those who really need to be there (like my other son, who has Asperger's and needed to be in smaller classes - there's no way in hell he could've done home schooling).


So its all good news in my honest.
They're giving him a laptop and a printer.
He'll have teachers online, full time, to help him during the day - and if he gets a job and studies at night, they're giving him free access to a 24 hour online tutor service (name escapes me)


Nice compromise if you ask me
I'm happy about it.
He doesn't have to go to the building, he can still earn his diploma, and he can still attend graduation ceremonies when he does.


Now I just wonder how long we'll need the building. Its only a matter of time before we live our entire lives online.



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