It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Huh? Not the Amero yet, Canada unveils some new plastic currency.

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:42 PM
link   
It's not the small stuff, but $100 bills made of polymer that will be in circulation in November.


The $100 notes will start circulating in November 2011. The $50 will be released in March 2012. New $20 notes will also be issued in 2012, followed by new $10 and $5 notes in 2013.


It has two clear panels in which security numbers can be read.
Story and pic here

Why is the Canadian government doing this if the Amero is to be a reality? Is this all a plan to sabotage our economy down the road in the NWO? Or is something else going on with the NWO plan?




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by aboutface
Why is the Canadian government doing this if the Amero is to be a reality?


Because the "Amero" is nothing but a hoax - there are no plans for it.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:49 PM
link   
What surprises me is that they are still printing money instead of forcing everyone to use debit/credit system.

Mexico has some plastic money as well. Supposedly bills will last longer and harder to counterfeit.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:49 PM
link   
I've never seen any real solid proof of the amero and i think the link you provided
gives you enough information as to why the bank of canada is doing this


Security features now include more sophisticated holograms and raised ink on the prime ministers' shoulders, on the biggest number and on the words "Bank of Canada."
The BOC aims to thwart counterfeiters by periodically redesigning Canada's banknotes, aiming to make them easier to check and harder to copy.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:54 PM
link   
Based upon inflation due to artificial wage increases and a multitude of other reasons, and the cost of producing currency, the only three outcomes are:

1. a dramatic real or created deflation and depression
2. a new tangible multinational currency (Amero) at a much lower rate than current currencies
3. a completely digital 'credit' system.

The cost of minting metal coins is making the product worth less than the face value.

I think we are all done for so I think the first option is most likely to result after the bartering stage of a post apocalyptic collapse that I anticipate.
edit on 20-6-2011 by Wolf321 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:59 PM
link   
Im pretty sure it has more to do with being harder to counterfeit. I like it. Also hard to rip......(how many half $5 bills have I had after going through the wash...too many) and you can go swimming with it or put it through the wash and it doesn't disintegrate. Also, not to mention they won't have to use paper which will be better for the environmentalists.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:59 PM
link   
I guess its a woman at the lead of the royal canadian mint.
Always refreshing things,
A new potrait here, new hologram there or spicing up the color so it feel warmer.


I hate plastic but this new refreshed 100$ bill is pretty much like the ancient one.
The Borden dude, the parlement(hologram) and 44672 maple leaves.
The color in the hologram are tricky but its an hologram after all, so you cant see much from a pic.

I just watched the bill for the second time and just realised it wasn't an hologram, its transparent. lol thats neat.
edit on 20-6-2011 by eagleeye2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:01 PM
link   
reply to post by Bixxi3
 


For sure the bills will be a secure improvement over what we have now.

My curiosity stems from from wht I believed was the NWO agenda, to unite North America in the same way as the European Union, and that would include currency. I guess I have more reading to do.
edit on 20-6-2011 by aboutface because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by aboutface
Is this a plan to sabotage our economy down the road in the NWO?


I feel our economy is already sabotaged beyond repair.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:40 PM
link   
reply to post by PassedKarma
 


Odering those new planes and building new bases are worrying me too. Naval vessels talked about. That seems to be a lot of high end spending. Is this what you're talking about?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:57 PM
link   

* The film that coats the bills, each made from a single piece of polymer, has a smooth, plastic feel and two clear panels.
* The windows feature metallic images as well as hidden numbers, visible when the bill is held up against a light source.
* The BOC advises people to "feel, look, and flip" if searching for the new security features. The interactive graphic, above, has the details.
* The $100 notes will start circulating in November 2011. The $50 will be released in March 2012. New $20 notes will also be issued in 2012, followed by new $10 and $5 notes in 2013.
* Sir Robert Borden is still featured on the $100 note, and William Lyon Mackenzie King remains on the $50 note. Now both former prime ministers look you straight in the eye.
* You'll no longer see the tribute to the famous five of woman's suffrage on the $50 bill, nor the discovery-themed miscellany on the back of the old $100.
* The new theme is "frontiers," with the $100 bill showcasing medical innovations, and the $50 paying tribute to Arctic research with the CCGS Amundsen. The as-yet unveiled bills will take us from battle frontiers like Vimy Ridge to space frontiers like the Canadarm.
* The BOC states that the polymer in the new notes has a lighter environmental footprint. The bills are 2.5 times more durable than their cotton-based counterparts and can be recycled after they are taken out of circulation.
* Security features now include more sophisticated holograms and raised ink on the prime ministers' shoulders, on the biggest number and on the words "Bank of Canada."

The BOC aims to thwart counterfeiters by periodically redesigning Canada's banknotes, aiming to make them easier to check and harder to copy.


This might be a stupid question but...wouldn't the old bills still be accepted? I see older designed currency here all the time and it gets used. The last redesign did show a significant drop in fake bills but, how does this reduce counterfeiting exactly? Do they phase them out indefinitely? I guess the change seems beneficial.

~Glu



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 11:05 PM
link   
reply to post by ElmersGluon
 


They usually have phased out old currency, but jhad a cutoff date. Just yesterday I saw some poor old woman get told that her $10 bill was a phoney. It looked real to me. From what I've been told by cashiers is that they discover quite a few phonies every day.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 11:11 PM
link   
reply to post by ElmersGluon
 



This might be a stupid question but...wouldn't the old bills still be accepted? I see older designed currency here all the time and it gets used. The last redesign did show a significant drop in fake bills but, how does this reduce counterfeiting exactly? Do they phase them out indefinitely? I guess the change seems beneficial. ~Glu


They would keep the old bills in circulation until they wear out.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 11:48 PM
link   
reply to post by snowspirit
 


Thanks for the reply.

And by the way, this is the first time I am reading your signature. That first quote hit home. Beautiful words to live by if you truly understand them.

~Glu



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join