The Problem With The Big Bang.

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posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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I do support the notion of a Big Bang, but my question is, where did that unfathomably dense point of energy and mass come from?

Had it always existed?

The first something can only have come from a nothing...

so...

What exactly is a "nothing" that can have "something"?

and...

Why doesn't The Big Bang happen again?

I have my opinion, but I want to hear yours.




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:27 PM
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Nobody can answer this question yet.
Maybe we spawned from a black hole somewhere, a white hole.
Perhaps there are multiple universes springing up all the time like soap bubbles.
Quantum physics is beginning to answer these questions but we’re not there yet; something from nothing seems impossible but maybe there’s never nothing.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:29 PM
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Its the point we can't see beyond, where our laws of physics break down and are simply not applicable. Its how we deal with infinity.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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edit on 20-6-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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That first something had to have always existed.. It couldn't have come from nothing
I think that dense point came from a previous universe..

Think of the universe as a dying star going super nova..
My theory is that the universe can only get so big then once it reaches that point, it begins to collapse in on itself
edit on 20-6-2011 by mb2591 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


There's currently no answer to that question, however one answer many people believe is God. Even Einstein believed that God was responsible for the Big Bang, however he also didn't believe that black holes existed but he was sadly mistaken. Plus if you believe that God is responsible for the creation of the universe in a cop-out for science since we don't currently have an explanation, that brings up the next question: What created God?

There's one theory that universes are like soap bubbles, and there are an unfathomable amount of soap bubbles which are constantly budding off of each other, forming more universes. Another theory is that there's an infinite amount of parallel universes, think of them as paper moving like a wave, stacked on top of each other. When the waves of two parallel universes bump into each other given the right conditions, that could be the event that starts Big Bangs and kick-starts universes into existence.

One thing I've always thought about, but probably is completely false, is that black holes might have something to do with Big Bangs. A black hole is an infinitely massive/dense point which can suck up an infinite amount of mass and not even light can escape it, so what if that material is actually being sucked through a portal (the black hole) into another universe? Or what if billions of years in the future, a black hole eventually gathers enough mass that it actually explodes because even it cannot contain that much mass, and that causes a rip in space-time which consequently is the Big Bang for another universe? Because the singularity which created the Big Bang, an infinitely dense/massive point smaller than an atom, sounds a lot like a black hole which is also an infinitely dense/massive point, except black holes are way bigger than an atom. Now that I think about it I'm not 100% sure if black holes are infinitely massive, because astronomers tend to refer to black holes as "x amount of solar masses", but still the theory is there for you guys to think about.
edit on 20-6-2011 by TupacShakur because: To edit my post



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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I have my own theory to support the Big Bang, I've mentioned it in another thread somewhere around here.

I like to think that the initial tiny sprout was not at all small. If you think about it, it encompassed all of existence. Which causes me to believe it was infinitely large, without boundaries but of a low resolution. As time (a very short time) passed, the matter within shrank and decayed according to the law of entropy- causing space.

If you can picture that animation effect where your screen has large pixels that contract into numerous smaller pixels defining a much higher fidelity image, that's what I mean. You screen size hasn't changed but what it contains is clearer. Also think of dot paintings that make no sense until you step back.

It really is the same concept as the classical theory but with an inverted viewpoint but it makes more sense to me.

PTX



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by Planet teleX
 


I was actually considering this as a possibility as I was writing this thread.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 

It would also eradicate the need for an initial 'spark' as existence could be infinite.

Found my old post: Here



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


What if in some weird way, all black holes are just one black hole.

What if they aren't dense energy at all, but a literal hole in the Universe that leads to a region of nothingness where space and time do not exist along with nothing else, and therefore instantaneous travel to anywhere in the universe is somehow possible provided you can survive the transition from somethingness to nothingness and back to somethingness again.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by Planet teleX
 


You sent me a link to a thread that I wrote.

Star for you.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 

Ha! I didn't even realise!

Talking about cyclical nature...



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by mb2591
That first something had to have always existed.. It couldn't have come from nothing
I think that dense point came from a previous universe..

Think of the universe as a dying star going super nova..
My theory is that the universe can only get so big then once it reaches that point, it begins to collapse in on itself
edit on 20-6-2011 by mb2591 because: (no reason given)


But if you keep going back through the previous universes, wouldn't there still have to be a beginning at some point?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:13 PM
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Some interesting links on the topic:
Cosmology Statement

Common Sense Science (plasma theory)

The way I look at it is that since we observe increasing entropy then the physical universe cannot be eternal. Since we also observe that no effect is greater than its cause, and it is philosophically impossible for anything to create itself since it didn't yet exist, then the physical universe must have a non-physical cause which itself is eternal. I can't imagine any way around this need for a non-physical first cause.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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Originally posted by SaberTruth
Some interesting links on the topic:
Cosmology Statement

Common Sense Science (plasma theory)

The way I look at it is that since we observe increasing entropy then the physical universe cannot be eternal. Since we also observe that no effect is greater than its cause, and it is philosophically impossible for anything to create itself since it didn't yet exist, then the physical universe must have a non-physical cause which itself is eternal. I can't imagine any way around this need for a non-physical first cause.


Your cosmology statement link did not work.

I believe nothing is infinite potential. The existence of a potential implies the probability of a kinetic. Nothingness is pure unbounded infinity. The infinite potential was so great that it could not contain itself as nothingness. It had to spill over into a world of form. The big bang is hardly a fraction of the potential of infinite nothingness.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


I like that idea, it'd be awesome if we could enter that region, and somehow be able to differentiate between black holes while in that area, and enter the black hole of our choice while in this no-mans-land, which would put us back in the universe in the spot of our choice. This would allow us to travel vast distances, which even at the speed of light would take millions of years, in the blink of an eye.

Another theory I've had about black holes is what if they actually have another point in the universe where all of that material which is sucked up gets ejected? A white hole; maybe a quasar?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by TupacShakur
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


I like that idea, it'd be awesome if we could enter that region, and somehow be able to differentiate between black holes while in that area, and enter the black hole of our choice while in this no-mans-land, which would put us back in the universe in the spot of our choice. This would allow us to travel vast distances, which even at the speed of light would take millions of years, in the blink of an eye.

Another theory I've had about black holes is what if they actually have another point in the universe where all of that material which is sucked up gets ejected? A white hole; maybe a quasar?


I believe that if my theory is true and the black hole is just a gate to nothingness, then with enough energy pointed in the right direction, before entering the event horizon, you could determine where exactly you wanted to go.

What if the nothingness is already full? The potential of infinity is overflowing into a world of form and trying to go to infinity through a black hole would naturally eject you through a white hole or quasar?

What if that's how something comes from nothing. The nothing is an infinite potential energy that is so large it could not contain itself as nothing so it had no choice but to become a something.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by smithjustinb
Your cosmology statement link did not work.

Hm, it seems to work for me. Maybe try again?


I believe nothing is infinite potential. The existence of a potential implies the probability of a kinetic. Nothingness is pure unbounded infinity. The infinite potential was so great that it could not contain itself as nothingness. It had to spill over into a world of form. The big bang is hardly a fraction of the potential of infinite nothingness.

I'm not sure I'd presume that a non-physical first cause would have what we know as a kinetic. If there was nothing anywhere, then I can't imagine how anything could ever happen. But if we presume that nothing was "infinite potential", then we have to ask where that potential came from, if it was physical. All sorts of new questions arise.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:43 PM
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Take one of your hardest questions like this
and have it asked to someone who seems to be
credible, MAYBE like Douglas James Cottrell....
Lets see if he can answer that


Douglas James Cottrell: Can supposedly answer any question through DTM, Deep Trance Meditation
edit on 20-6-2011 by MajorTom4754 because: New info



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 

The paralysis in the Origins & Creationism forum caused by this thread seems to be negatively affecting the rest of Above Top Secret now.

Formerly, threads like this had their home there. Now creationist babble is spilling over into the science forums.

What a shame.



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