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Sea Level is Rising Faster Than Ever Seen

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posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:17 PM
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Sea Level is Rising Faster Than Ever Seen

They found that sea levels were stable from around 200 B.C. to A.D. 1000, followed by a rise of 0.02 inches (0.5 millimeters) per year for 400 years. After this increase, the sea level held steady through the late 19th century. Sea levels started rising again since then, averaging about 0.08 inches (2 millimeters) a year on average. This is the steepest rise the group has seen in its records, which go back more than 2,100 years.


So, this doesn't seem like a "the world is ending now!" situation, but in a hundred years or so this could be bad. I don't think global warning is a completely man-made phenomenon, but I do think that we complicate the situation. Changes in sea level is obviously a natural occurrence, but could humans impact on the environment make the situation worse? The Earth is an ever-changing place, we humans must be ready to change with her.




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by ProjectBlue
 


Ever since the ice age, the ice has been melting!

It does not take a scientist to figure that out. The earth changes as the solar system changes.

2 mill, Really? WHO CARES? This is like saying the earth may flood in a thousand years, or not.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by Sky watcher
 


It's the yearly increments that are worrysome. It might only be a tiny amount per year, but when you consider the long term implication of tsunami and storm surges, they get worse with every millimeter of the sea level rising.

Check this out

The cities in the link are in America, but there's quite a few worldwide as well. Those who are on higher ground will have to rebuild to replace coastal cities. That's a bother our kids will need to handle.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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I read the the book the Windup girl. In the book Bangkok was intact due to the Thais making a massive dam. (Sea levels have risen at the time)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by ProjectBlue
 


wasn't there just a thread showing climate change scientists adding .2 millimeters per year? sorry. .3 millimeters.




The University of Colorado’s Sea Level Research Group decided in May to add 0.3 millimeters -- or about the thickness of a fingernail -- every year to its actual measurements of sea levels, sparking criticism from experts who called it an attempt to exaggerate the effects of global warming.


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by Bob Sholtz
reply to post by ProjectBlue
 


wasn't there just a thread showing climate change scientists adding .2 millimeters per year? sorry. .3 millimeters.




The University of Colorado’s Sea Level Research Group decided in May to add 0.3 millimeters -- or about the thickness of a fingernail -- every year to its actual measurements of sea levels, sparking criticism from experts who called it an attempt to exaggerate the effects of global warming.


www.abovetopsecret.com...


Boom.. Was just about to point that out..



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by Bob Sholtz
 


There's always skulduggery, but the point is... sea levels ARE rising. How fast might be up for debate, but that shorelines are threatened is not.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by masqua
 


Yes, thank you for that. And there is the idea that this problem may increasing exponentially because of man's impact on the environment. Its 0.08 inches per year now, but it could be 0.15 inches per year in 20 years, and so on. I can also imagine the issues countries like The Netherlands could have in the future.


Rising sea levels could threaten coastal cities, with 50 percent of the U.S. population living within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of the coast. The faster sea levels rise, the more difficult it will be for cities to adjust and the more dramatic the erosion of the coastline will get, according to researchers.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by Bob Sholtz
 


Haha, wow, that is too funny! Thanks for pointing this out. The world never ceases to amaze me!



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:21 PM
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I'll tell you what: let me know when the ocean starts rising at 100 millimeters a year, and I might be more concerned about it. I understand that's a dramatic change, but that's not much of anything in absolute terms, even multiplied over several centuries.



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