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Last Roll Out of a NASA Space Shuttle

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posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:11 AM
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In the final move of its kind, NASA's space shuttle Atlantis was photographed earlier this month slowly advancing toward Launch Pad 39A, where it is currently scheduled for a July launch to the International Space Station.
The mission, designated STS-135, is the 135th and last mission for a NASA space shuttle. Atlantis and its four-person crew will be carrying, among other things, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello to bring key components and supplies to the ISS. Pictured above, the large Shuttle Crawler Transporter rolls the powerful orbiter along the five-kilometer long road at less than two kilometers per hour. Over 15,000 spectators, some visible on the right, were on hand for the historic roll out.




STS-135 roll out

source: APOD

Let's not forget the incredible achievements that were done by the Space Shuttle through the years, from 1981 to 2011:


STS-133 roll out


STS-1 launch pad - 1981

Am I wrong or seems like that there was no schedule for any (US) Space Shuttle successors?




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:18 AM
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I'm not sure, but how I'd love to see something like this in real life!

But, if you are right, then have they got more shuttles to send up there? Maybe something a little more advanced is about to be launched if that is it's last mission?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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I was there for the Atlantis rollout and will still make a thread on it after the Atlantis launch, which I will also be at. I made a thread, linked in my signature, on Endeavour's final launch. I have also made one on Discovery, I have Atlantis left to do lol

It took hours for it to move, you were able to get as many pics as you wanted lol

It was pretty packed there and we had to wait in traffic to turn into the VAB area for about an hour.


Cool pics



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:28 AM
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Originally posted by drsamuelfrancis
I'm not sure, but how I'd love to see something like this in real life!

But, if you are right, then have they got more shuttles to send up there? Maybe something a little more advanced is about to be launched if that is it's last mission?


There are no more shuttles, this is the last one to go up. The rest are being taken apart or refitted for travel to their respected final resting spots lol

They are working on a new shuttle vehicle but it won't be out for years and it won't be like the shuttles.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


Haha I just noticed the crowd in the first picture, Im in there somewhere towards the front! LOL



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 

Wow! What a lucky guy you are, thanks for the links, amazing experience and photos for sure.



They are working on a new shuttle vehicle but it won't be out for years and it won't be like the shuttles.

Any more insights on this? I know that for future launch that will be the Soyuz craft that will travel to and from the ISS, but I was wondering when the NASA planned to launch the Space Shuttle successor...



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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Wait...I thought the last shuttle flight was the final one?
Exactly how many more are there?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by dethduck
Wait...I thought the last shuttle flight was the final one?
Exactly how many more are there?

Well, there were three "last missions", depends on how you consider the word "last"


February 24, 2011: Discovery: Last Discovery flight; STS-133
May 16, 2011: Endeavour: Last Endeavour mission; STS-134
July 8, 2011: Atlantis: Last planned Atlantis flight and last Space Shuttle flight; STS-135

Moreover and at first, the Space Shuttle was originally to be retired in late 2010, but has been extended until July 2011 according to the NASA launch and mission schedule.
Last year, Michael Suffredini of the ISS program has said that one additional trip will be needed in summer 2011 to deliver parts to the International Space Station.
edit on 20-6-2011 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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Well, the VASIMR engine is not in the payload, so the proposed ISS test of the engine will not be hauled up by a Shuttle.

Payload



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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How disappointing that they would end the shuttle program without its replacement anywhere near ready to go. I think it's just more of the "America should step aside and let someone else lead" mentality. This event is just another nail in the proverbial coffin.
Sad.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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A small tribute video I tossed together a couple of years ago.


Enjoy


(click to open player in new window)


edit on 20-6-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Wow! great video, thanks for sharing.

My favourite is this one: Solid Rocket Booster Cameras from the Space Shuttle Atlantis:




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 

Wow! What a lucky guy you are, thanks for the links, amazing experience and photos for sure.



They are working on a new shuttle vehicle but it won't be out for years and it won't be like the shuttles.

Any more insights on this? I know that for future launch that will be the Soyuz craft that will travel to and from the ISS, but I was wondering when the NASA planned to launch the Space Shuttle successor...


LOL you'd never know it, but Mblah is one of the many VERY SEXY ATS chicks

v
ETA: I remember watching the very FIRST Shuttle launch, I am hoping I remember to watch the last one....
edit on 6/20/2011 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)


jra

posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
Well, the VASIMR engine is not in the payload, so the proposed ISS test of the engine will not be hauled up by a Shuttle.


I don't believe the Shuttle was ever considered to be used to haul the VASIMR engine up to the ISS. The latest information that I've read says that the VF-200 won't be launched until at least 2014 and the Taurus II rocket is being considered as the launch vehicle.


Originally posted by Kaiju
How disappointing that they would end the shuttle program without its replacement anywhere near ready to go. I think it's just more of the "America should step aside and let someone else lead" mentality. This event is just another nail in the proverbial coffin.
Sad.


While it would have been nice to see a replacement before the Shuttle retired, it's not the end of the world. When the Apollo program ended in 1975, there were no more manned spaceflights for 6 years until first Shuttle mission in 1981. So this isn't the first gap in US manned spaceflight, nor will it be the last I'm sure.

Launching people and cargo to LEO should be done by the private sector anyway, in my opinion.



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by elevenaugust
 


I am female



From what I have been told it will be about 5yrs til we have a new type of orbiter but they won't be like the shuttle.



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver
reply to post by elevenaugust
 


I am female



From what I have been told it will be about 5yrs til we have a new type of orbiter but they won't be like the shuttle.

Ouupps! Sorry


Well, from the wiki page, the successor will be either the Constellation project or a modified version of the Ares I and Ares V vehicle into a Shuttle-Derived heavy launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, both for crew and cargo... to becomes operational in 2014 at the very earliest3



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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I have a question:

Atlantis' doesnt have a rescue shuttle.

So, what happens if the shuttle gets so damaged that it can't dock with the ISS, and so bad shape it cannot return to Earth? Could the crew EVA to the station?



posted on Aug, 9 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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Hi you all. First post on ATS, I've been lurking for some time, though. This issue of astronauts, space shuttles, has always called my attention, yet here are things that escape my understanding. How does a space mission work step by step, from the moment the rocket is launched until the spacemen return to Earth and all the different phases in between?

I was wondering if someone can provide a video, diagram, drawing or whatever that illustrates this step by step for the laymen.



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