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Honeybees might have emotions

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posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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Honeybees have become the first invertebrates to exhibit pessimism, a cognitive trait previously thought only 'higher' animals possessed. If these honeybee blues are interpreted as they would be in dogs or horses or humans, then insects might have feelings.


Bateson and Wright tested their bees with a type of experiment designed to show whether animals are, like humans, capable of experiencing cognitive states in which ambiguous information is interpreted in negative fashion.



Earlier research has found rats and dogs capable of pessimism. Bateson has also documented pessimism in starlings. But though honeybees have passed tests of pattern recognition and spatial modeling, the idea of feelings occurring in their sesame-seed-sized brains is generally considered unlikely, if not downright laughable.

“Invertebrates like bees aren’t typically thought of as having human-like emotions,” said Bateson, yet honeybees and vertebrates share many neurological traits. “Way, way back, we share a common ancestor. The basic physiology of the brain has been retained over evolutionary time. There are basic similarities.”


Researchers have trained the bees to associate one smell with a sugary reward and another smell with bitterness. They then shook half of the beehives, to mimic a predator attack. Afterwards, the bees that had been shaken still responded to the scent, although they were more cautious.


Further analysis of the shaken bees’ brains found altered levels of dopamine, serotonin and octopamine, three neurotransmitters implicated in depression. In short, the bees acted like they felt pessimistic, and their brains looked like it, too.


Bateson said that the results could be interpreted in one of two ways: either bees have feelings, or cognitive bias isn't as tightly correlated with feelings as we thought

She said that in future studies she hopes to investigate whether honeybees express other emotions, such as happiness. She also wonders about the mental effects of chemicals and disease.


“It would be interesting to know if pesticides were altering their cognition, creating states similar to depression,” she said.


Honeybees might have emotions




posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Can it have a lasting effect on their behaviour, or are the effects such as caution merely temporary? It is interesting to know more about these little buzzing people. You think it will change anything in regards to how they're treated?

Honestly this makes me feel so guilty. The amount of bugs (bees included) that I've swatted away or sprayed with death spray will surely be enough to make them come back and haunt me, because I made them sad.

I think their emotions would be kind of 'robotic' in nature, as in they will simply help the bees to differentiate between 'good' and 'bad', which is a common skill of animals that helps survive and keep surviving successfully in an evolutionary sense. In fact it's not really that surprising that insects possess at least some form of rudimentary emotions. It is Darwin's logic.

Thanks for the article, it is very interesting!



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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You can be sure they do.

Just like the have pesrsonalities too. Proof V


Even bugs have personality.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by Griffo
 


Since I have retired I am outside doing a lot of gardening. We now have a lot of flowers
.

I have found our bees (and they are rather large, almost as big a my thumb) rather gentle and sweet.

If they fly too close to me, I gently swish them away. They watch me weed.

Once long ago, I saw a spider in our house crawling on the floor. He/she was rather a big one and I let out a blood curdling scream.....................I swear to god the poor little thing started shaking.

My husband came running and the poor little thing knew it's life was coming to an abrupt end.

Since that time, I have marveled, I never suspected that bugs, or "lower" creatures possessed emotions or intellegence, but since that time, after observing nature and her many creatures I have found there is so much we don't know and in our arrogance take forgranted.

Well, the honey bees by us are making a come back, and they are big, healthy and very gentle creatures.

I use to be scared of bees but not any more, since gardening, they pretty much just want to taste my flowers and don't want to pick a fight with me.

I'm on friendly terms with our bees.

They're rather interesting and beautiful to watch.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by ofhumandescent
 


Sweet story. !

I've had similar experiences with other bugs, like flies. And even some that seem to listen what I said
as they did what I asked


Edit to say : I do talk to bugs yes I never expect them to respond though

edit on 6/19/2011 by Sinter Klaas because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by DeepThoughtCriminal
 


unfortunately people just don't care look how we treat dolphins and eliphants the smartest animals around...



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:16 PM
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Bees are people too! Of course they have emotions, I've hung out with enough bumblebees to get to know them, and they have nothing but intelligence and kindness to guide them. Some of the nicest people on earth. You can pet bumblebees (I've never tried to pet a honeybee), but very lightly and in short pets. They "seem" to like it.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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Maybe bees are just psychic and knew their heads would cut open and their brains examined.
That's enough to make anyone pessimistic.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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I've never had any problems with acknowledging the fact that animals have emotions. It's pretty obvious to me. But, it's always harder to "feel" with insects, so this was a very interesting read. Thanks!



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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reply to post by ofhumandescent
 



Just to sate my own curiosity, why did that spiders life have to come to an end?

In the last 2 years I have ushered countless spiders outside. Usually, i just let them live in the house. As long as we are not infested, a few spiders will not hurt me.

Among those spiders i have released outside, there have been 3 or 4 tarantulas, as well. A long broom for them to climb on, and they are gently deposited in my yard.

The only insect that gets killed in my house are scorpions. They hurt too much, so it isn't worth trying to save them.

Our creator put those spiders here for a reason. perhaps one of those reasons is to teach us a little humanity and kindness for our Creators creations?



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:59 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Okay you got me there BFFT, yes I screamed bloody murder, this was a big wolf spider and he/she scared me - my husband came running saw the poor little guy and that was that.

I am okay with spiders outside - inside, sorry, one of my phobias..............any spider inside my house dies.

I admit I am not perfect.

While I am a animal advocate (for most animals) I am still leary about spiders, snakes and scorpions (never saw a live scorpion or had a snake in my house).

I'm not perfect, working on it, but spiders in my house die an early death.

There is only one animal, (bug) I kill outside and that are the ants we have in my garden - these suckers are mean, they attack, swarm and bite the &%$#@ out of you within seconds, no joke.

So, spiders, any kind of bug inside my home get clobbered.

The only exceptions are, lady bugs, moths, grasshoppers, and bees get jarred and let outside.

BTW: If you were to break into my house uninvited, unannouced you might meet the end of my rifle I have stored next to my bug out bag in my closet as well.

My house, is my home, my sanctuary. I'll share my yard with the critters but once they or anyone or anything crosses my door's threshold univited they are fair game.

As a end note: I will also kill any mouse or rat I find in my home (never have we don't have rats or mice or bugs in our house).

Well, except for that one little field mouse I had to kill at our first house 30+ years back and I had a new born baby asleep in the next room and a bunch of little ones napping.
Still feel bad about that but they propagate fast and spread disease.

Again, I'm pretty nice but not perfect.


edit on 20-6-2011 by ofhumandescent because: grammar



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:04 AM
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So I guess thye aficanized killer bees are the thug gang of the bee world?

Even ET told us "Bee Good."



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by ofhumandescent
 



come out to West Texas. We will let you have some snakes AND some scorpions in your house.

I see 2-3 scorpions a week usually. We spray the outside to keep them out...but i live near a "forest" of mesquite trees and they just come in from everywhere.

About every 5 years or so we will have a rattler under our sink or in a closet. Rattlers generally won't bother you. But once in my house my choice is to pay a fortune to have it removed, or just remove it myself. To do it myself, the snake as to die first, unfortunately.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by ofhumandescent
 



come out to West Texas. We will let you have some snakes AND some scorpions in your house.

I see 2-3 scorpions a week usually. We spray the outside to keep them out...but i live near a "forest" of mesquite trees and they just come in from everywhere.

About every 5 years or so we will have a rattler under our sink or in a closet. Rattlers generally won't bother you. But once in my house my choice is to pay a fortune to have it removed, or just remove it myself. To do it myself, the snake as to die first, unfortunately.



West texas is the worst part of texas.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by DuceizBack
 



Not gonna argue with you about that. I prefer New Braunfels/San Antonio. Was going to move there, but a job here was too good to pass up. So now i stay in the desert.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:23 AM
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This is one of the saddest things I've ever heard. If you can't be happy when your whole job is to fly from pretty flower to pretty flower putting golden dust on your legs while dressed in a Yellow and Black striped jacket, then what chance have I got



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:22 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 




Well, I have seen pictures of Texas and it's a beautiful state and the Texans I've met have guts of steel and hearts of gold..........but, nope not moving to Texas thank you very much.

Now, got a rattle snake story for you.

I'm originally from Missouri and use to live out in the country.........one hot July/August afternoon, I was walking along the railroad tracks, not watching where I was walking. I was wearing those cheap thin keds popular back in the mid 60's when all of a sudden I as I stepped down I felt a gushy round thing under the insole of my foot, without thinking (thank god fast reaction) I raised my foot up and watched a four/five foot rattler side wind out from under me.............it was black, white, gray and brown plaid and man it slithered sidewinding very fast, he/she was very scared.

I called out to it, "thank you for not biting me, sorry hope I didn't hurt ya".


Honest, my very best, dearest friend is a Native American and she will literally bribe me to come on "nature walks with her" as I seem to always attract the critters.

OMG...................scorpions and rattlesnakes, you are one brave dude.

BTW: If you have to kill it, you can skin and eat it (why waste it?)

Have you ever ate rattlesnake? Now there's an animal (that and crocs & alligators I don't begrudge people eating because they are naturally prone to be nasty to humans, small dogs and cats).

If you have eaten rattlesnake, crocs or alligator could someone please tell me how they taste?

But, that one rattler I stepped on was nice and thank goodness my reflexes were fast - if he had bitten me I would have died before getting to anyone that could have helped me, I was really far away from civilization.

Scorpions I hear are tasty too but no thanks, they are very scary to me.


edit on 20-6-2011 by ofhumandescent because: grammar, not sure snake was at least four maybe five feet long, big and super fast side winding movement



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 



tarantulas




Well, I guess I am a old wussy, I'de have a friggin heart attack.

Our Wolf Spiders are scary enough............I do have one in my garden and he/she stays over on their side at the end and we're fine, but again any spider in my house is going to meet a early death.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by ofhumandescent
 



Gator tastes sort of like pork. You thought I was going to say chicken didn't you?


No rattle? Are you sure it was not some other snake? Although rattlesnakes are quite docile and dare I say it beautiful in their own way.
edit on 20-6-2011 by ..5.. because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by ..5..
 


No, looked it up in the snake book I have and it was absolutely a rattler.

I was very very lucky that day.




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