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Ending 40 years of drug war: the impact on Latin America

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posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 02:52 AM
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Ending 40 years of drug war: the impact on Latin America


www.csmonitor.com

Compared to most US gangsters, Mexico’s drug traffickers (as well as Colombia’s, Guatemala’s, etc.) are far better armed and more liberal with violence. They also have a great deal of experience with extortion, kidnapping, human trafficking, pirate merchandise, even oil theft, and an end to the drug prohibition would initially encourage them to double down on these alternative enterprises. Since extortion and kidnapping impose a much steeper penalty on society than surreptitiously moving a shipment of coc aine, legalization would likely not amount to a positive development in terms of public security in the short term.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 18-6-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 02:52 AM
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The 40th anniversary of Washington's war on drugs has sparked calls for the decriminalization of narcotics, but what may seem like common sense for the US could spell disaster for Latin America.


So what is the suggestion here, keep the drug-runners employed and failed policy intact? Who benefits by that?


This is not an argument against legalization, merely a call to consider its implications fully. To reiterate: eventually, the lower profits would lessen the allure of organized crime and push future would-be criminals into other walks of life. Likewise, the criminal groups that do exist would be less capable of bribing and bullying public officials, which would lead to stronger government institutions. But Latin America’s transition period would be tricky at best, and a humanitarian disaster at worst.


Forty years of disastrous policy is bound to have some blowback. Among the pro-Drug War lobbies are law enforcement agencies are among the most vocal advocates. This would not appear to put them out of business, but it would change the focus of their jobs. It may require investigative work and dealing with a truly dangerous element.


The end of drug prohibition would remove that opportunity cost, but more effective security agencies capable of closing most of the cases that come before them would provide an even stronger, more enduring disincentive. Therefore, legalization advocates need to pair their calls to rethink drug policy with redoubled efforts to strengthen Latin America’s police agencies, judiciaries, and penal systems.


And without the Drug War to "keep the doors open" would police agencies find use for their "No-Knock" policies? And what excuse would be used to continue diminishing our privacies? Don't tell me, those rights and privacies would suddenly be restored after this War is over?

www.csmonitor.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 18-6-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 03:40 AM
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Great OP, star and flag. IMHO the so called "drug war" that has taken place over the years is nothing but a complete front to keep law enforcement fully funded and the excuse to begin creating private jails. It has failed completely in every way possible, has wasted billions of tax payers money and caused more deaths and bloodshed than anyone can possibly conceive. People will ALWAYS get drugs no matter what laws are passed; there will ALWAYS be a market for them, no so called "drug war" will ever stop this.

The Netherlands should be viewed as a prime example of how drug laws should be implemented in North America.

Thanks for the reading, it gets boring here at work during the graveyard shift.
edit on 18-6-2011 by Jocko Flocko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 



Another great thread about this ridiculous war.

Thanks for keeping this issue in our thoughts.

I wonder how many people have really lost their lives due to these policies.

While these gangs are growing stronger by the day.

S&F



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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These are good points ...

I never considered these aspects of ending the 'war' ( makes me cringe when i call it a war .. its pathetic )

But regardless of the unwanted short term side effects ... right is still right ... and those side effects should be dealt with accordingly ...

Yeah ... when the war has ended .. and criminals double down on these other activites ... all they have to do is start a war on extortion, kidnapping, human trafficking, pirate merchandise, and oil theft .. sorted



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by Segenam
These are good points ...

I never considered these aspects of ending the 'war' ( makes me cringe when i call it a war .. its pathetic )

But regardless of the unwanted short term side effects ... right is still right ... and those side effects should be dealt with accordingly ...

Yeah ... when the war has ended .. and criminals double down on these other activites ... all they have to do is start a war on extortion, kidnapping, human trafficking, pirate merchandise, and oil theft .. sorted

War against extortion, kidnapping, human trafficking... those would be wars against tyranny and not tyrannical in and of themselves. What we currently have is a War Against Freedom and Liberty. Stop! No more WAFLing!

Indeed, let our forces and powers deal with those problems, turn their inflated budgets and workforces toward dealing with those problems if that is what is expected. Without the global Drug War to "fight" there will be plenty of manpower and facilities to fight whatever problems arise. Battling kidnappers would be the time to utilize their "no knock" powers that were overly intrusive and undeserved for enforcing petty drug policy violations. Tactics like those and asset forfeiture made the Drug War a war of tyranny against the people.

People must decide here and now who or what "owns" their bodies. If I am not owner of my own person then I am not a free man. Such policies of the Global War on Drugs consigned each and every person to slavery on a worldwide scale. Those who wish to continue this tyranny are enemies of every man, woman, and child on this planet. This must stop now!

If a blowback is expected there is no better time than now with the law enforcement workforce we currently have to deal with those problems. They should fight that war with the same fervor they fight the War Against Freedom and Liberty. Let the War on Slavery begin.


edit on 18-6-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 05:51 PM
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Do you know which number to call if you see "El Chapo" because i know its not 911.


Kidnappings seem to be the most popular
edit on 18-6-2011 by HisMajesty because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Well... I suppose They would increase these other issues a bit. But They will, over time, lose money and power. Let's face it, They probably already are extorting everyOne They might... Why wouldn't They be? Maybe kidnapping would go up - but there aren't many worth kidnapping in the long run.

Meanwhile, families are not broken up merely for the use of the pariah plant, People are not incarcerated for something that had no victim, police corruption will fall drastically, and We will not be spending 40 billion a year to hunt, sting, arrest, try and incarcerate People who use Their medicine - for stress, mostly (that's what "just wanting to get high" really is - treating stress) and the very long list of other advantages.
edit on 6/18/2011 by Amaterasu because: punctuation



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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Originally posted by HisMajesty
Do you know which number to call if you see "El Chapo" because i know its not 911.


Kidnappings seem to be the most popular
edit on 18-6-2011 by HisMajesty because: (no reason given)


The emergency number in Mexico is 066.

Might as well cut their funding right away. We have the manpower and resources to handle the blowback problems that could arise. Supposedly law enforcement would be would be going after the same people as before so there is already gathered intelligence about these groups. Going after kidnappers and extortionists would meet with broader general approval.

This could be the golden opportunity for all nations' law enforcement to regain public respect by fighting a worthy war.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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The way I see it, the "blow-back" will be coupled with the crash of the Dollar and so subsequently the picture that is being portrayed is slightly one-sided.

Their money is Dollars! I guess they can use their guns and start the illegal "food" cartel next???



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by Greensage
The way I see it, the "blow-back" will be coupled with the crash of the Dollar and so subsequently the picture that is being portrayed is slightly one-sided.

Their money is Dollars! I guess they can use their guns and start the illegal "food" cartel next???


Would that be because the US economy is reliant on drug-control revenue? Or just following the dollar's trend?

A kilo of tortillas is now costing $11mx, 11 Mexican Pesos, which is about $.92us. Beans aren't too expensive and I grow chiles in the garden. If things get really bad my cat occasionally brings me a protein present. There may come a day to be thankful for that 'gift.'

Illegal food, is that non-Monsanto? Someday soon perhaps - pirated vegetables.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Legalizing marijuana alone would cut off a huge source of income for mexican cartels. 70% to be exact. That's according to the National Drug Threat assessment for 2010.
Just say no to wars.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


If I were to open the wallet of a cartel member, I am pretty certain to find US$ in there; so I would say that your pesos are a sound investment my friend!

The US$ is being falsely kept afloat by means that are beyond my understanding; how in the heck this evil greenback has survived this long is beyond me. I actually should take my own advice and convert my money now! LOL

Personally I make some pretty great tortillas! My Caldo is not bad either! Come on over we can celebrate once the system fails and people are free to finally live naturally again.




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