Do you have painful Arthritis ??? stop drinking COFFEE !!!

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posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
You may have hit on something here. I'm going to give it a whirl and see what happens. I'll let ya know my results on the 25th.


great, can't wait to hear your story

will be tuning in for your update.




posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


heres some links about uric acid, coffee and .......



www.hellolife.net...

The results of the study showed a direct link between increased coffee consumption and lower uric acid levels. The study determined there is no link between total caffeine consumption and uric acid levels, as it also looked for any possible effects of soda, tea, decaffeinated tea and decaffeinated coffee........

The study has shown a direct link between an increase of coffee consumption and a decrease of uric acid levels. Decaffeinated coffee was shown to have the opposite effect: more cups of decaf coffee resulted in a drop of uric acid levels, but inversely. The study showed that men who drank 1 to 3 cups of regular coffee a day had a decrease of 8% in their uric acid levels. When coffee intake rose to 4 to 5 cups, uric acid levels dropped by a dramatic 40%. 6 or more cups of coffee resulted in a 59% decrease of uric acid levels.

In contrast, decaf coffee consumption of 1 to 3 cups showed a decrease of uric acid levels of 33%. When decaf coffee intake rose to 4 or more cups, uric acid levels dropped only 27%, demonstrating an inverse relationship between decaffeinated coffee and uric acid levels.

Scientists aren’t sure exactly what it is about coffee that seems to lower uric acid levels. There is a strong antioxidant in coffee called phenol chlorogenic acid, which may have something to do with it. While scientists aren’t recommending an increase in coffee consumption to alleviate or prevent gout, they do acknowledge the link and see the need for future research. Studies will need to be done to isolate the component in coffee that seems to lower uric acid levels, and to determine if there’s an effect in women as well as men.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by xuenchen
 


thanks X for your help.
u have been an asset
to this thread.
star 4 u



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 03:03 AM
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Damn this sucks, I drink at least two cups of black coffee a day. But I have joint pains in my wrist, shoulders, elbows, knees, and my ankles. I don't know if it's because of coffee but I'll try not drinking coffee and see if the pain goes away...

Sad, I love coffee.



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by blackrain17
Damn this sucks, I drink at least two cups of black coffee a day. But I have joint pains in my wrist, shoulders, elbows, knees, and my ankles. I don't know if it's because of coffee but I'll try not drinking coffee and see if the pain goes away...

Sad, I love coffee.


be sure to drink more WATER too !

another trick is to use less "coffee" when you brew it !
edit on Jun-21-2011 by xuenchen because:




posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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just another bump, hoping someone
else might see this thread and take
the coffee challenge to stop for 7 days.

keep us updated of your progress.



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 09:19 PM
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Originally posted by boondock-saint
just another bump, hoping someone
else might see this thread and take
the coffee challenge to stop for 7 days.

keep us updated of your progress.


My parents have failed but I have not. To be fair though I haven't drank coffee in years and as said days ago I am 26 years old. I know kind of early but still some people report having this kind of pain early in life so you never know. I have no aches at all except for my right knee but that was for combat reasons.
edit on 23-6-2011 by Stop-loss! because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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My experiment with cutting out coffee results.

I know, I'm late, but I didn't see results after a week. So here we are.

Nope. Nothing and Nada. I switched to water in the morn. I do think I ate larger breakfasts than usual. But the pain thing has not seemed to go away any more than it already did.

I'm back to my two cups of coffee a day, and am still observing how I may be affected.



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 

I took your challenge, and gave up even my beloved decaf 8 days ago. The first 3-4 days were hell. My hands killed me... Swelling, pain, numbness, stiffness. Misery. But then about day 5 it started to get better and today, day 8, I can get gloves on I could not, and my discomfort is so much less. There is no question that the coffee was doing it.
I find I also cannot do tomato, tea ( unless it's herbal) or gluten. They all affect my hands in the same miserable way.
Thoughts on that? I don't know if I have rheumatoid arthritis or not, but I sure am sensitive to certain foods and beverages, and the joints in my hands and feet and neck tell the tale.



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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Thank you for this thread. I have RA. And drink alot of coffee, more or less have to. As 5 boys and no thyroid, with the replacement only partially acceptable to my body, and without nonstop coffee, would have fallen asleep at the wheel by noon and they would not have survived their childhood.

But milky tea may do the trick instead. I only like tetley tea, no green, have to drink green with milk it upsets my stomach too much to not have milk. In any case, have considered now the youngest is 11, going on to tea, since I've been crippled up and had a hard time driving, and kids pull me out of my chair and bed at times. Also ribs are affected as well.

RA and arthritis in general: Vitamin D, 10 000 iu's. I got some really good powdered magnesium with other vitamins, specially formulated for fibromyalgia at the healht food store, and it absorbs quickly.

Soluable fat vitamins such as E, A, and cod liver oil, coconut oil, real butter, real fats in meat (that they say are bad for you.) They're wrong. Body always needed them for bones and teeth.

Liver.

Soup bone marrow soup.

Basically the way my grandparents ate, and some of it was norwegian for my grandfather, that is the correct diet for optimum health and good for arthritis.

I was taking iodide, and it got worse, and had to quit. Apparently, in a study I found iodide causes the swellings to occur with RA.

Despite mobility issues, rarely take pain killers for it. The coconut oil and vitamins work within a few days quite nicely. Have had the cortisone shots and they helped enormously for a couple months.

Change over on sides when you sleep.

And also, had to take antibiotics for something else, and my knee got better. Already thought I may have some infection because when I doing self massage was really ill the next day, as if I had released toxins by massaging many of my joints.
edit on 15-12-2012 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2012 @ 02:17 AM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 

noooooooooooooooooooooooo! I can't give up my beloved coffee, though I have tried to cut back on it. Recently diagnosed with osteoarthritis in my knees and hands. At age 35 too. Getting tested for Rheumatoid and Vascular Disease as well. I find nothing works for the pain but I also have chronic clotting issues at the moment.

But I can't give up my coffee...that's my only drug!



posted on Dec, 26 2012 @ 02:19 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 
]]

Have you ever been tested for bleeding disorders? There seems to be a linkage in people (like me) with bleeding disorders and RA - also hormone disorders. I have Factor V Leiden, PCOS, Osteoarthritis, Vitamin D deficiency and a few other things going on...also getting tested for RA.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 05:45 AM
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So they have studies showing that tea increases arthritis and coffee doesn't, its good for arthritis.

www.livestrong.com...

Good for Gout, but too much a higher risk of RA

Then this one contradicting it:

www.arthritistoday.org...


Studies now show coffee is not a factor in heart disease and cancer; it may actually lower the risk of type 2 diabetes, gallstones, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Why the change regarding the benefits of coffee? Most early studies focused on caffeine, and some – such as the one that seemed to show female coffee-drinkers had a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than non-drinkers – failed to account for other risk factors, such as smoking, diet or alcohol consumption. Today’s research does, and it is looking beyond caffeine to evaluate other substances in coffee, including antioxidants that help protect cells in the body against damage.

When it comes to RA, though, there is a bit of lingering uncertainty about coffee health benefits. A 2002 study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) showed no connection between regular coffee and the onset of RA, but did find that four or more cups of decaf per day increased the risk for older women. But Ted Mikuls, MD, a rheumatologist who conducted the study, notes that in 2004, researchers from Harvard Medical School in Boston found no connection between RA and either variety of coffee.

The jury’s still out on coffee benefits and osteoporosis, too. Caffeine can cause your body to absorb less calcium, but so far studies haven’t established whether drinking coffee contributes to bone loss. These studies suggest that you’d have to drink four or more cups a day (without milk) to risk harm.


So it doesnt seem to be the coffee, and the only studies that showed harm were the de-caffienated and also, if you drank more than 4 cups without milk.

Now here is the tea:

www.dailymail.co.uk...

Claiming 4 cups or more of tea increase arthritis.

while I've read that green tea is good for arthritis and has an anti-inflammatory.

Rather confusing info.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:15 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


I've also read that a couple of cups of black coffee a day (without cream or sugar) is good for the heart. Same with wine - a glass or two of red wine is good for the heart. A whole bottle? not so much





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