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The waters of Lake Nahuel Huapi Argentina: The result of Puyehue - Incedible Vid

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posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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This is incredible to see.


The lake’s crystal clear waters are very susceptible to climate changes and have an average surface temperature of 45 °F (7 °C), this makes it both beautiful and treacherous. Hypothermia is one of the risks bathers must undertake. Kayaking is a popular sport on this and adjacent lakes. The lake is also the starting point of the Limay River.


Here is the wiki on Lake Nahuel...some "before" pics as well. Wow.

What Once Was

and now check this out. Remeber, this is in Argentina...

Let's Go Swimming....maybe not...

Not much coverage per usual on the msm netwebs.
Of course things like this (ash) are to be expected after such a major event, but still, it always boggles my mind when exposed to our insignificance. The amount of destruction is incredible, but the earth has a way of mending itself.
Just thought I'd post some powerful images as a result of the Puyehue eruption.

ColoradoJens
edit on 16-6-2011 by ColoradoJens because: could be Ralph was a distractin me




posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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Wow, what a shame. Hopefully this beautiful lake can recover.

The reports of this volcano's eruption has been underwhelming. Maybe because there have been so many volcano eruptions over the last twenty some years, they are no longer big news.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


Thanks poet1b; I suppose you are right. I just thought that this was a particularly interesting video for some reason. I wonder what a full areial view would look like and how far out that meter thick ash goes?

ColoradoJens



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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not hearing about this at all from media establishment.
good find. star 4u. thx



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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If that's just a lake think of what its doing to the infastructure. Drainage, water supplies, electricity lines, weighing down on roofs would be the main issue even as far out as this. Despite the concentrations of ash in the atmosphere when it settles collectively its still more denser than snow being made up of crushed rock particles afterall.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by works4dhs
 


works4dhs...not as in Denver DHS? Anyway, thanks and back at ya. I admit anymore I can only peruse the msm sources casually so I may have missed something but that is wild, eh?

CJ



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by RUDDD
 


Thanks for the reply RUDDD. There must be at least 2-3 feet of ash on the water...amazing how it undulates...and yeah, this must pose health issues as it is hard to imagine any above ground water source not being affected.


CJ



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 


bump. This is not the video shown in the other thread about Puyehue...this is a new one.

CJ



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 


That video shows some massive ash and pumice on the water!
Why is the msm ignoring this?

S&F, thanks for posting!



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Thanks burntheships...I think the video speaks for itself - amazing earth...but yeah, no msm. I suppose if I really gave it some thought, I really can't rely on the ole' fox, cnn,abc,cbs,nbc, paradigm anymore. It's like politics and these canned "debates"...they never have and never will discuss what I want them to. I don't care anymore about it. It is all a dog and pony act and I am through pretending. Thank goodness for the internet and individuals who can basically post their own news for us to see what is happening in this world of ours.
Thanks again!

ColoradoJens



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 


Sigh, yes they are to busy with the Weiner, or lol however he spells his last name.

The newscasters are pathetic! I would not buy a newspaper today, only but to gain
a dollar off something I want.

The news on the tele? Oh, snap, just forget about it. Yes, thanks for the internet, long may it live!



bts~



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 11:45 PM
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Thanks for posting this.

This is a beautiful lake - Maybe I should say "was" for the time being. This whole region is covered with lakes and rivers, so I imagine the volcanic debris is overwhelming. Maybe even affecting their water sources.

I doubt snow and rain will wash it away effectively. Based on the incline of the city, all the volcanic debris that hasn't been shoveled up will eventually wash out to Lake Nahuel Huapi making it worse than it is. So, I think there will have to be some large scale effort to properly retrieve and dispose of it.

Also I wonder how this buildup will affect ski slopes. Having such loose material under a heavy snow bed seems risky to me, especially on steep terrain (making a guess here). I can see mudslides, snowslides and maybe even avalanches as the result of all the ash and debris left under snow. This would be much harder to clean up.

They have already cleared many roadways and city streets with modified trucks and snow plows, yet not sure yet on how they could clean the lake itself. Luckily this lake is not essential for transport or fishing, so the economic impact will not be that severe. Yet it may affect their tourist season.

Here is a photo of Lake Nahuel Huapi near Bariloche (before the eruption).




posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by matito
 


Thank you for that post matito. Based upon what you say, can I assume you are a native of that country or know it well? It would seem that this is going to be a problem that lasts many years, and one can only hope that this is not just the beginning of an Andean melt-down...Any other info you can provide of the economy of the area and or it's importance to the watershed of Argentina? Thanks again.

CJ



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 12:07 AM
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That is one of the craziest things I have ever witnessed!

It's not on the msm because it's not affecting North America.

Although I and many others would deem this very newsworthy, noting nature's beauty/horrors.



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by InnerTruths
 


Yes, thank you and agreed on all points. In converse, I disagree only in that it relates to the msm because we are all human and frankly, we the people want to know about something important, not Lady GaGa's meat dress.

Thanks for the post and star to you!

CJ



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Wow! How sad that such a beautiful place now looks like sludge


Seems like every thing else, the news stations are NOT covering much that is going on in our world, at least the IMPORTANT things, such as our earth happenings



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by summer5
 


Hi, thanks summer5. I know, but I do think it will rebound...in 20-30 years. If we look back at the Mt. St. Helens eruption, you can see there was similar destruction. I know the earth will be ok. Some day...thanks for the post! Go summer!

CJ



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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Here is a video of Nahuel Huapi that I found on another thread here at ATS.

At first it looks like desert sand, yet if you watch closely, it's slowly rolling with the waves. The lake is actually under all of that debris and ash.




edit on 17-6-2011 by matito because:

edit on 17-6-2011 by matito because:



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 



Thank you for that post matito. Based upon what you say, can I assume you are a native of that country or know it well? It would seem that this is going to be a problem that lasts many years, and one can only hope that this is not just the beginning of an Andean melt-down...Any other info you can provide of the economy of the area and or it's importance to the watershed of Argentina? Thanks again.


Hi ColoradoJens
I agree that it may take years to fully recover from the tons and tons of volcanic ash dropped in Argentina.
I have family in Chile - around 6 hours drive from Bariloche. Unfortunately I don't know anyone in Bariloche and the MSM in South America is not covering the story very well either. I was searching major online SA newspapers a while back and couldn't find any worthwhile news. Most of the best news came from independent sources (bloggers, reporters and researchers). Then ATS members (like you and burntheships) quickly posted it and saved me a lot of time hunting it down myself!

This region of Argentina depends primarily on tourism (year-round). Mostly for skiing at the many popular ski resorts. Peak ski season starts around July, so I'm sure it will affect their local economy somehow. Maybe more South American tourists will visit Bariloche just to see what happened first hand. Tourism from Chile will be very limited (by car or bus), since the international pass goes very close to the eruption zone.

I'll do some more investigating and if I can find any new info then I will post it here.

Here's some other interesting videos





edit on 17-6-2011 by matito because:



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by matito
 


I appreciate the reply and information...as you pointed out, most of the "news" I am getting anyway, is from people such as yourself...anyone with a connection. I hope your family is safe in Chile and as I have family in Ecuador, I am really hoping the whole Andean Rim doesn't start shaking...more volcanoes than you can shake a stick at down there.

The images of the lake are incredibly sad. Considering this is a tourist area, it will be decimated for decades. It is truly amazing. Thank you again for the info and respect...

CJ



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