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HAARP Challenge - Line of site can't reach

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posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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A lot of people are claiming HAARP can do all sorts of things: change weather, cause earthquakes, etc.

I've looked quite a bit into this over the last month and actually agree HAARP technology, in my opinion, based on Tesla Technology and various other things CAN cause earthquakes but WAIT!!!!, that's not the purpose of this thread.... my question is about directionality.

HOW can HAARP direct it's beam?

I recognize that due to there being 180 antennas they can direct it, but it could only reach line of site, maybe a few degrees away from Alaska.

One other possible way is to bounce the beam off the Ionosphere, then against an airplane, then back off the Ionosphere again.

So, how could HAARP affect someplace like Haiti?




posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


HAARP's array interferes with aircraft when they fly through it's beam, that's why they have a C band radar on site to detect any aircraft in the nearby airspace.

If you ask me, this goes a long way to show that the array does indeed shoot straight up.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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Here is a pretty good web article that shows you how it works.
This is when it first came out.
www.bibliotecapleyades.net...



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Basically the elf waves will heat certain particles in the upper atmosphere of a chosen vibratory wavelength. Through that imagine the round atmosphere bulging causing a lens to form which depending on the angle directed can allow for out of sight communications.

Hope that is somewhat clear.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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I consider it to be like the rail of a pool table: shoot it at a certain angle up into the ionosphere and it comes back down at an equivalent angle. That would not make sense though if it only went straight up because then, logically, it would come straight back down.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 11:34 PM
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To elaborate from before, if the em waves from the array heats the ionosphere its like putting a contact lens up there from the charged bulge. This lens can be manipulated on its axis as well so it does not always lay parallel to the ground ( directed like a sat dish) which can increase range or accuracy of directing said waves beyond the horizon, this also does not get into its ability to pull charge from the ionosphere but that could be a whole other topic.
edit on 15-6-2011 by GhettoRice because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 





HOW can HAARP direct it's beam?




I noticed alot of talking on bending and different paths.


DEVIATIVE
Type of ABSORPTION occurring wherever the ray path bends
significantly such as near the top of a ray trajectory. Deviative absorption
predominately occurs near a layer critical frequency...........................



MULTIPATH

Term applied to propagation conditions where a signal may arrive at a
receiving location through more than one geometric path.......................


CHORDAL MODE
An ionospheric propagation mode characterized by two successive
Earthward reflections from an ionized layer without an intermediate
ground reflection, usually caused by an ionospheric tilt........



GREAT CIRCLE
The intersection of the Earth's surface with a plane containing the center
of the Earth and two points on its surface. A great circle is the shortest
distance between those two points. Radio waves usually (but not always)
follow great circle paths from transmitter to receiver.

www.haarp.alaska.edu...

It looks like they are focussing the beam in the lower right hand corner. Bouncing it off of everything.







Some Performance Parameters for the HAARP Antenna System


TextSize...... 1040 feet X 1280 feet

Area...... 30.6 acres
Directivity.....
3 Mhz ....100 (20 dB)
10 Mhz..... 1000 (30 dB)
Main Lobe Beamwidth
3 Mhz..... 15 deg
10 Mhz..... 5 deg
Operating Frequency... 2.8 - 10 Mhz
Pointing Angle ......Within 30 degrees of Vertical
Reposition Time...... 15 deg. within 15 microseconds
Polarization....... Left/Right Hand Circular, Linear
Sidelobe Control...... Full - By Element Tapering
Maximum VSWR...... 3.2:1

www.haarp.alaska.edu...



I noticed that there is nothing in the directivity section. It is blank.

What I did notice is, is the POINTING ANGLE. It says within 30 degrees of vertical.


If it says within, does this mean that it can change? Whenever I read "within", it is not an exact number or range, this is also known as a tolerance.

Also, why is there a reposition time? Would this mean that they have to reposition the beam, or array?


Help me out here folks. I see not that much information on this thread. Just alot of speculation.



ETA: Also notice.


Sidelobe Control........ Full - By Element Tapering
www.haarp.alaska.edu...

Here is some information on sidelobe.

In antenna engineering, side lobes or sidelobes are the lobes of the far field radiation pattern that are not the main beam, where the terms "beam" and "lobe" are synonyms.

The radiation pattern of most antennas shows a pattern of "lobes" at various angles, directions where the radiated signal strength reaches a maximum, separated by "nulls", angles at which the radiation falls to zero. In a directional antenna in which the objective is to emit the radio waves in one direction, the lobe in that direction is designed to be bigger than the others; this is the "main lobe". The other lobes are called "side lobes", and usually represent unwanted radiation in undesired directions. The side lobe in the opposite direction (180°) from the main lobe is called the "back lobe". In transmitting antennas, excessive side lobe radiation wastes energy and may cause interference to other equipment. In receiving antennas, side lobes may pick up interfering signals, and increase the noise level in the receiver..

en.wikipedia.org...


So does this mean that with different side lobe locations and angles they can scatter or point the beam in different directions??

I would like to see if annone can answer these questions. I am finding alot of information about bouncing, scattering, and pointing beams. How come people think that this is not possible?

edit on 16-6-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 

There really isn't room for a lesson in electromagnetic propagation but the picture in the lower right of the collage represents how satellite signals can be distorted by the ionosphere (and other things) before reaching an Earth station.

Signals transmitted to and from satellites for communication and navigation purposes must pass through the ionosphere. Ionospheric irregularities, most common at equatorial latitudes (although they can occur anywhere), can have a major impact on system performance and reliability, and commercial satellite designers need to account for their effects.

www.haarp.alaska.edu...
edit on 6/16/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 02:44 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Ok, Thank you for the info.

This thread was a bunch of speculative opinions. I thought I would try to bring a little thought process here. By the looks of the pic, it seels to be bouncing off of everyting, but instead it is showin distortion. I "learneded" sumtin today.

Thank you.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 02:47 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


There was no speculation on my part...

Just sayin.

Apart from it being an S band radar, not C band... lol


edit on 16/6/11 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 

The bouncing is part of the distortion. I don't know if you're old enough to have endured broadcast television. One of the things we had to deal with was "ghosts", a multiple image produced by the TV signal bouncing off of mountains and buildings.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 

Yup. The beam does go straight up.
Even with maximum deflection it still goes mostly straight up due to spreading.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 03:02 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


No problem here.

I didn't name names.


I just wanted the informaton. I looked over the main Haarp site for a couple of hours reading it.

It's all good.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 03:15 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I think I do recall the static tv screen at grandmas years ago.

She used to watch He-Haw all of the time. Can't forget about Benny Hill. I am not that old though. I am 32.

Thank you for filling me in.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 03:25 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


Great info!!

Now who wants to figure out the 30 degree tangent of a ray from Gakona, AK, bounced at 25+ miles high



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 





Now who wants to figure out the 30 degree tangent of a ray from Gakona, AK, bounced at 25+ miles high


I think I will leave the trig to Phage. I am getting exhausted.

It is about time for bed. Typing getting sloppier by the post.
edit on 16-6-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 



I recognize that due to there being 180 antennas they can direct it, but it could only reach line of site, maybe a few degrees away from Alaska.

One other possible way is to bounce the beam off the Ionosphere, then against an airplane, then back off the Ionosphere again.


You do realize that HAARP is not the only Phased Array in the world, right?



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by ErtaiNaGia
 


yup, I know of at least 4 (proven) and have heard there like 15 or so, via blogs.




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