It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Buddhism for beginners, moderates, and experts

page: 1
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 08:13 PM
link   
Beginners

Buddhism can be simplified to mean this: form is emptiness, emptiness is form, physical appearances are illusions surrounding the true content hidden behind the form. Thus, form is empty of real meaning. An example: a book could be a good book despite having a torn and faded cover.

Moderates

Buddhism teaches that suffering is caused by desire. Desire for physical gratifications. Lessening this desire will equate to lessening of your suffering. Take for example someone who has a large spending habit, they will constantly need more impulse buying to satisfy their cravings, hence, greed.

Experts

Nirvana, the goal of Buddhism, is a liberation of the mind from false views. To see the physical world as impermanent and subject to repeated suffering, you can transcend this suffering by achieving nirvana, sublime peace of mind, equanimity in all things good or bad, timeless wisdom to discern the illusory nature of physical matter, and the personal conviction and experience of the "other world", nirvanic bliss, which is a freeing of the mind from false reality and into the super-conscious state of true happiness within you, the "Light" within the soul.




posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 09:01 PM
link   
reply to post by filosophia
 


I would add that true understanding of the way of buddhism is only possible through the practice of meditation.It is meditation that lifts the veil or the illusions, it brings us to our core being of infinite god like potential.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 08:07 AM
link   

Originally posted by jgarcya
reply to post by filosophia
 


I would add that true understanding of the way of buddhism is only possible through the practice of meditation.It is meditation that lifts the veil or the illusions, it brings us to our core being of infinite god like potential.


You are one of the few that places the order correctly. Most people want to stick some sort of religious order in front of and necessary for acquiring a true meditation. That is not necessary, because it creates expectations.

Pure, simple meditation alone can lead to enlightenment. But the newbe may find themselves bewildered to extreme in making up their own answers to what they find. Probably most starting that way, however, take the truth that they have found and attempt to match it with an existing structure of understanding. Buddhism hits the mark quite well, even if we can see where it is extensively practiced that it is not the complete answer.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 08:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by filosophia
Beginners

Buddhism can be simplified to mean this: form is emptiness, emptiness is form, physical appearances are illusions surrounding the true content hidden behind the form. Thus, form is empty of real meaning. An example: a book could be a good book despite having a torn and faded cover.

Moderates

Buddhism teaches that suffering is caused by desire. Desire for physical gratifications. Lessening this desire will equate to lessening of your suffering. Take for example someone who has a large spending habit, they will constantly need more impulse buying to satisfy their cravings, hence, greed.

Experts

Nirvana, the goal of Buddhism, is a liberation of the mind from false views. To see the physical world as impermanent and subject to repeated suffering, you can transcend this suffering by achieving nirvana, sublime peace of mind, equanimity in all things good or bad, timeless wisdom to discern the illusory nature of physical matter, and the personal conviction and experience of the "other world", nirvanic bliss, which is a freeing of the mind from false reality and into the super-conscious state of true happiness within you, the "Light" within the soul.



I'm gonna copy and save this. It is the most concise explanation I've ever seen. Well suited for the short attention-span habits fostered by the internet!



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 09:27 AM
link   

Originally posted by jgarcya
reply to post by filosophia
 


I would add that true understanding of the way of buddhism is only possible through the practice of meditation.It is meditation that lifts the veil or the illusions, it brings us to our core being of infinite god like potential.


true. Meditation is a free exercise that anyone can do, to unlock personal happiness and self-esteem. Let's spread the message of meditation



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:02 PM
link   
You will find that, when you practice restraint from desires, when you resist the urges to gratify your senses, you will conserve your spiritual energy, as basically, when we pursue the material world, we end up sacrificing our spiritual selves.



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 05:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by filosophia

Originally posted by jgarcya
reply to post by filosophia
 


I would add that true understanding of the way of buddhism is only possible through the practice of meditation.It is meditation that lifts the veil or the illusions, it brings us to our core being of infinite god like potential.


true. Meditation is a free exercise that anyone can do, to unlock personal happiness and self-esteem. Let's spread the message of meditation


In the brand of Buddhism I practice...

Anything can be meditation. Zen mindfulness, Zen flesh, Zen bones....



posted on Jun, 16 2011 @ 06:33 PM
link   
Suffering's root is ignorance. Mindfulness, meditation, and understanding will allow one to transcend the suffering of ignorance. To understand that "this is, because that is." All is impermanent, interconnected, co-dependent, and lacks any separate self. Once this is understood fully, true liberation from pain and suffering can be achieved.



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 09:23 AM
link   
any good book for buddhism?



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 09:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by mrmih
any good book for buddhism?


George Grimm

here's a website

aryan-buddhism.blogspot.com...
edit on 17-6-2011 by filosophia because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 09:31 AM
link   
reply to post by filosophia
 


thank you my friend



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 02:11 PM
link   
reply to post by mrmih
 


Book: Old Path White Cloud - by: Thich Nhat Hanh-- well written , birth through death of buddha, and his teachings, and path to enlightenment. My Favorite. its like the buddha is telling you stories. He made his teachings simple enough so children could understand, and they were his first students. This is my "bible". Enjoy



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 02:20 PM
link   
This old book started me on the path....

rickpdx.wordpress.com...

and this old book helped me to....

www.amazon.com...



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 02:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by jgarcya
reply to post by mrmih
 


Book: Old Path White Cloud - by: Thich Nhat Hanh-- well written , birth through death of buddha, and his teachings, and path to enlightenment. My Favorite. its like the buddha is telling you stories. He made his teachings simple enough so children could understand, and they were his first students. This is my "bible". Enjoy


One of the best books I've ever read. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting a good read.



posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 09:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by mrmih
any good book for buddhism?


This is a bit more contemporary, but I found it great...

rebelbuddha.com...

Book: www.amazon.com...



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 01:14 AM
link   
reply to post by mrmih
 


This is my second favorite The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche. I believe that in order for us to truly live we have to accept death. this book teaches you how to do both.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 04:31 AM
link   
Thank you all,i will find and read the books you said!
And if i find something else by my self i'll post it here for you to take a look too!



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 10:11 PM
link   
You've succinctly described the Theravada tradition but that isn't "all" of buddhism.

What about the bodhisattva vows?
If emptiness and nirvana are the highest truths and ultimate goals, what is the point of delaying enlightenment for the sake of others?



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 11:18 AM
link   
reply to post by sidewayszombie
 


I think they are almost one and the same. Didn't the buddha make it his goal to teach all that inquired about his enlightenment? He didn't have to deny nirvana in order to do this, since he was the first enlightened being. Wasn't it him that created the Bodhisattva tradition, didn't he get reborn to help his fellow man. Technically the first bohisattva, did not exist until he reincarnated. According to the OP, since he was enlightened, he was in their definition in "nirvana", because he saw things for how they truly are. How can you experience nirvana and deny it at the same time?

Assuming that the buddha isn't alive today in some form or another, wouldn't he be in nirvana now. Isn't he helping all that recite "om mani padme hum" from the great place in the sky, like he said he would?

I believe the point, maybe not belief in bodhisattva, but the fact that we failed to talk about the inherent belief in reincarnation. It essential to understanding the Path.

To me the theravada form is the closest to the original form of buddhism. If you know the history, It was discovered in india, then china, then japan. It was saved in the Theravada tradition, closest to the original, isolated for centuries in the mountains of tibet. All other forms and traditions came later, they are offshoots/developments on his original teachings.

I believe that every buddhist who lives by their teachings is a bodhisattva. Their example is the Way, it alone has the ability to lead people to the path. Do you really have to know you were once an enlightened creature in another lifetime in order to spread the Way?

Since i studied the original therevada form of buddhism, please enlighten me so i may increase my knowledge.

Blessings



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 02:18 PM
link   
reply to post by jgarcya
 


Please forgive the persnickitiness. Fundamentally I think we agree and I'm almost always on the OP's side in other threads, but I felt like things weren't adequately described so I briefly left the comfort of lurking.

In one sense there is absolutely no way for us to disagree. I paraphrase the lotus sutra in saying that the alleged color of the ox enticing us to leave the burning house really does not matter, and arguing over it is foolish.
But the lotus sutra also compares Theravada to an illusory oasis city halfway through a dangerous and tiring journey, to refresh and encourage everyone further on to the bodhisattva ideal.
Also in the lotus, Buddha mentions other buddhas before him which he paid homage to when he was only a bodhisattva.

I'm not sure how you can defend Theravada as "closest to the original" since our Buddha taught both Theravada and Mahayana. Unless you don't really believe the lotus, prajnaparamita, shurangama, avatamsaka, vimilakirti sutras and dozens of others are real.
Those sutras are more or less the heart of the ones used in chan and zen schools so in that sense I guess they seem to have a more distant relationship.

I don't mean to sound like I'm down on Theravada or that it doesn't contain the meaning on its own. Within it are excellent descriptions of conduct and structures of reality not described in the Mahayana texts. I just feel uncomfortable when a huge part of the buddhist canon is glossed over or ignored.

I don't think it is vital to know one is a bodhisattva to be one, but I find the thought encouraging. Virtue is virtue whatever you want to call it, or not call it.

And if I could enlighten you then we'd be having a totally different conversation.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join