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Arizona Police Officer Execute Man For Telling Them They Needed A Warrant

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posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:40 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by OhZone
 



If you call the police over an argument, you are a retard. There is no law against arguments. I would never call the cops, unless there was a corpse I need cleaned up, after I took care of whatever problem arose.


For gods sake call a lawyer first and give them travel time so they get there before the er er LEOs arrive.




posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by NuroSlam
 


In all my years I've never seen Brit cops pay for fast food at night or have to wait in line, I've never seen them in food shops in the day so I don't know what the practice is before dark.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:49 AM
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Originally posted by Thepreye
reply to post by NuroSlam
 


In all my years I've never seen Brit cops pay for fast food at night or have to wait in line, I've never seen them in food shops in the day so I don't know what the practice is before dark.


Well, I can tell you that once a year Corporate sends an email out saying to send food to all local police stations for some honour a cop day or some such nonsense, Myself, I take the allotted money for this and instead feed the fire department. While I detest everything about government, the fire department is the least offensive of them all. And let me tell you, getting them to even accept the food is near impossible.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 06:53 AM
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Originally posted by anumohi

Originally posted by gentledissident
Lets not forget about informants.They are criminals working for the police. They get away with theft, vandalism, etc due to their importance. They even get to do the drugs without fear.


and they even let them out of prison to snitch and run stings


Never grass, once they've got their hooks into you they'll use you up like a meth whore, even cops don't like the grasses it's never worth the first deal you make.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by Thepreye
 


A lot of fast food joints give cops free food, in hopes that they will respond faster if there is ever any trouble. The wendy's I worked at in HS did that, and they took advantage of it if you ask me. They would come with huge orders all the time.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by NuroSlam
 


What this breakdown lacks is the number of complaints where the officer was exonerated of any wrongdoing. It also lacks the breakdown of how many complaints were outright false and found to be so.

Anyone can make a complaint. And a number of those complaints are probably completely bogus in an attempt to get a quick buck from the police department or in an attempt to get the charges dropped. And a number of those complaints were probably found to be a justified use of force.

Just because you can show the numbers of how many complaints there were sheds no light on how many actual instances of police misconduct there was.

Thats like showing what someone was charged with but not actually showing the not guilty finding.

I have reviewed the website and the creators clearly have an agenda against the police that they are attempting to further by providing these statistics without further investigation or breakdown. Anyone can provide slanted statistics knowing what conclusion the reader will be led to.

Let me put a spin on the numbers too:
-There are over 1,000,000,000 instances of police officers taking action every year and having contact with the public. Whether that is arresting someone, responding to a call, writing tickets etc. etc. etc.
-The website states that there were 4,861 complaints on those contacts.
-That means that out of all police action taken in 2010 only 0.0004861% were alleged to be misconduct. Some of which were most likely deemed unsubstanciated or false after investigation.

Also,
-There are around 500,000 sworn police officers in the United States.
-The website states that there were 6,613 officers that received complaints in 2010
-That means out of the total number of sworn officers in the United States only 1.3% received complaints last year. So there were around 493,387 officers that did not receive a complaint of misconduct.
-Some of those complaints were most likely deemed unsubstanciated or false after investigation

If you look at it this way, the numbers speak for themselves. A few bad apples. A few bad apples can give a person with an agenda against the police enough statistics to fabricate whatever view of the police they want.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by zuluAttack
reply to post by SnakeShot
 


Are u smoking@!! THE POLICE WORK FOR US!!! dont tell people when they get shot and killed o well too bad
cuz if it werent for us COPS WOULDNT HAVE THEW MONEY TO BUY THE GUNZ AND THE BULLETS IN THE IFIRST PLACE!!!WE PAY THEM THEY WORK FOR US


What are you smoking? Your response doesn't even have anything to do with my original post-->

"Far as I know they didn't need a warrant if the lady invited them in. If the kid was in his bedroom then that might be a different story?

I'm sure he'll get paid leave and then a slap on the wrist unfortunately."



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by areyouserious2010
If you look at it this way, the numbers speak for themselves. A few bad apples. A few bad apples can give a person with an agenda against the police enough statistics to fabricate whatever view of the police they want.


It also lacks the number of cases that are not reported. 1 incident is to many.
edit on 18-6-2011 by NuroSlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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If the mother called the police, they have absolutely every right to go into the home, even if the kid was in his bedroom, they've been invited in to the HOME.

Also, under provisions of the PATRIOT ACT, police actually don't need any warrant to enter any home any more, even when you're not home.
edit on 18-6-2011 by babybunnies because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra
As far as the op article. The cops dont need a warrant to enter the persons house since mom said they could go in. We only have one side of ths story, distraught mom with the penache of overdramatising what happened in order to pander to the media. I am curious what the police side of the story is.


You keep saying that there is only one side to the story and we don't have the police's side.

You are very wrong in that statement.

1 side: Mother.

2nd Side: Police Officer's own partner.

We HAVE heard from the cops and the cop who was there said the pig murdered this man. PERIOD. End of story. No need to hear the whining excuse that the other cop is going to come up with. We have a WITNESS!!!!!!
edit on 18-6-2011 by Nutter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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Originally posted by areyouserious2010
reply to post by NuroSlam
 


What this breakdown lacks is the number of complaints where the officer was exonerated of any wrongdoing. It also lacks the breakdown of how many complaints were outright false and found to be so.

I have reviewed the website and the creators clearly have an agenda against the police that they are attempting to further by providing these statistics without further investigation or breakdown. Anyone can provide slanted statistics knowing what conclusion the reader will be led to.

Now you say you have investigated the site, but did you notice that on the daily report from the day before they actually research the complaints of misconduct for validity?


by David......
Phoenix AZ police sniper allegedly shoots wrong woman in face during stand off when female suspect ran into her home. While I was suspicious when I read the early accounts on this one, I’m questioning it more now that additional information is being released, it may get dropped from the database. [3] http://(link tracking not allowed)/mABpyY



David
June 16, 2011 at 10:52 PM
hg,
More recent reports allege that, after she ran into the home she went out the back and drew a gun on officers that were waiting behind the home, then she ran back inside. The reports further allege that, during the standoff, someone shot at officers and remote listening devices officers sent into the home. Finally, the police allege that, at some point, the women exchanged clothes before the other woman opened the curtains and appeared to be standing over the other woman in an aggressive manner. Police allege the women lived in the same house as well.
It’s pretty convoluted though so I want to wait until more information comes out, especially from the woman who was shot if that happens. It’s a tough call.

www.injusticeeverywhere.com...


Let me put a spin on the numbers too:
-There are over 1,000,000,000 instances of police officers taking action every year and having contact with the public. Whether that is arresting someone, responding to a call, writing tickets etc. etc. etc.
-The website states that there were 4,861 complaints on those contacts.
-That means that out of all police action taken in 2010 only 0.0004861% were alleged to be misconduct. Some of which were most likely deemed unsubstanciated or false after investigation.

Also,
-There are around 500,000 sworn police officers in the United States.
-The website states that there were 6,613 officers that received complaints in 2010
-That means out of the total number of sworn officers in the United States only 1.3% received complaints last year. So there were around 493,387 officers that did not receive a complaint of misconduct.
-Some of those complaints were most likely deemed unsubstanciated or false after investigation

If you look at it this way, the numbers speak for themselves. A few bad apples. A few bad apples can give a person with an agenda against the police enough statistics to fabricate whatever view of the police they want.

Again, viewing the site you can see at a glace where the majority of these incidents happen, primarily 5 to 9 states thus removing a large section of the LEO force.
www.targetmap.com...



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by Nutter
 


Really.. and what exactly did the second officer on scene, which is not the partner of the firt officer, say, other than it was his worst day ever?

What did he mean by that?

Being they have not responded to press inquiries aside from is statement with no explanation behind the statement, how exactly do you knwo what occured?

The mother was not present in the house when the incident occured. She was outsaide, per her own statement.

Do you normally jus tkae bts and pieces, glue em together, and present it as the difinitive story of this is what happened?

As I said, we dont hvae both sides of the story.
edit on 18-6-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


You forgot the whole reason why we know the cop said "I don't need no MFing warrant", didn't you?

That was from his partner. The other policeman on scene.

So, yes, we've heard from the cops side. And it's just as bad as the mother's side.

Unless you're thinking that it matters if the cop mistook his revovler for a stun gun? Are we going to let THAT excuse fly again?


BTW....I treat all LEO who are on the same scene as partners at that moment. You do not?
edit on 19-6-2011 by Nutter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 07:59 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


Have you even looked further into the story at all?

It has already gone to trial. So, yes, the court has heard from Crissman.


According to court documents, Chrisman held a gun to Rodriguez' head when the 29-year-old refused to let officers into his South Phoenix trailer.

After a brief struggle, Chrisman allegedly shot the family dog, and then shooting and killing Rodriguez as he was trying to leave. Rodriguez was not armed.

Chrisman's attorney is arguing that the shooting was justified because Rodriguez, who has also been shot with a Taser and hit with pepper spray, was an imminent threat.

Officer Sergio Virgillo, who was with Chrisman at the time of the incident, said Rodriguez was not posing any threat when he was shot.

Chrisman's attorney said the Maricopa County Attorney's Office has not talked to Chrisman about the shooting and is relying only on Virgillo's account of what happened that afternoon.

This is not the first time Chrisman's integrity has been questioned.

According to police records, Chrisman and another officer were accused of planting a crack pipe on a woman during an arrest in 2005. The incident was caught on a video surveillance camera. It was determined that the officers did this as a joke in an apparent attempt to provoke a reaction from the woman.




www.azfamily.com...

Some joke huh? Planting evidence. Is this the usual kind of joking that you pigs do?

The real joke is the POS LEO's who remain on duty because the good LEO's are too scared to say anything.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 08:10 AM
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Until the "Good" cops actually start to stand up and speak out, getting these thugs and goons out of the police force, ending this thin blue line garbage, they are in fact just as guilty if not more so. If I knowingly over look another manager selling expired product in any store I work, it is grounds for immediate termination. I have seen this first hand.


edit on 19-6-2011 by NuroSlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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I just thought of something.

xcathra says that police don't receive special treatment.

Well, officer Crissman was filmed planting a crack pipe on a lady and got a slap on the wrist for "playing a joke".

Now, if I am caught in Arizona with a crack pipe on my possession I get:


A. It is unlawful for any person to use, or to possess with intent to use, drug paraphernalia to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, prepare, test, analyze, pack, repack, store, contain, conceal, inject, ingest, inhale or otherwise introduce into the human body a drug in violation of this chapter. Any person who violates this subsection is guilty of a class 6 felony.


narcoticnews.com...

Now, any person possessing drug paraphernalia in the state of Arizona gets a class 6 FELONY....read that again....a FELONY charge.

Why wasn't this pig charged with a felony for possessing a crack pipe? And then planting it on a suspect?

Give me a break that pigs don't get preferrential treatment.

edit on 19-6-2011 by Nutter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by Nutter
 


That would be because its illegal for a private citizen to be in possession of an illegal narcotic. I can go into what allows us to be in possession of that item without violating the law, but since your sole intent is to go after law enforcement, I wont bother. Its not like you would read and actually understand it anyways.

Ill let you continue your atacks unhindered.

Remeber, the theme is deny ignorance, not embarace. You should learn the difference.

Provided you are able to actually engage in a conversation that involves law enforcement without placing them all into your blanket stereotyping.

You should learn the difference between an indictment, and acvtually being convicted of a crime. As I stated before, we have one side of the story, being this has not even gone to court yet. A preliminary hearing where a person says guilty or not guilty is not court.

But since you are bent on denying due process to any law enforcement officer, please tell us the outcome of thise case.
edit on 19-6-2011 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by NuroSlam
 




It also lacks the number of cases that are not reported. 1 incident is to many.

What you seek is perfection. Nothing in this world we live in is perfect. Whether it is an officer making a mistake or outright police misconduct, any reasonable person knows that the police strive for perfection but know that it is unattainable. In any profession, there are bad employees.

You say that you work at a food service establishment. Is it correct to say that you have never gotten an order wrong? No, it would be unreasonable for someone in your profession to expect that or claim it but I am sure you strive for it. Would it be reasonable for someone to assume that after one wrong order, or a few wrong orders in a small amount of time, that you screw up all of the orders that you receive? No, it would not be reasonable.

Unfortunately, when it comes to police work, mistakes or bad employees can cost people a lot more than a disappointing dinner. Also, people cannot simply choose to use a different police department if they do not like the service they receive from the one they have. Nonetheless, most police officers and their departments strive for perfection but are prevented from attaining it by frivolous complaints and substandard employees.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by NuroSlam
 


This website cannot claim to investigate every complaint received by every department thoroughly enough to determine if they are unsubstanciated. It is not possible. Without them speaking directly to all witnesses, complainants and officers and conducting the investigations themselves. They are merely posting the number of reported allegations of misconduct without any say on their validity. The reason behind this is to paint their own picture which fits their own agenda.



posted on Jun, 19 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by areyouserious2010
 


For every case that is documented, there are hundreds that are not. Like it or not, it is the truth (in my opinion) ... These unreported cases spread by word of mouth, no media required.

When cases go public, people come in to voice their opinions, and vent about bad law enforcement... What seems to be an unexplainable and growing trend of law enforcement contempt and hatred, is now in part explained.

Karma is a bitch!

Eventually, in some areas where things are arguably worse than others, there is going to be violence, I don't see any way it can be avoided... At some point a large enough number of people are going to rise up and realize their strength in numbers.... In these uncertain times, and the current bad economy and very high unemployment, benefits run out etc... It will not take much more to push people over the edge... And it will spread from there, especially as there is a law enforcement crackdown... This has been building for too long.

You can pretend this isn't going to happen, and convince yourselves that there are only a few bad apples, and minor incidents all you want... It will not change the reality as it is now.

This can all be avoided, as I said in previous posts it must happen internally within all law enforcement agencies etc.

You think the hate and contempt expressed online is bad?

You should hear from people on the streets.


edit on 19-6-2011 by Fractured.Facade because: (no reason given)




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