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Lots of little dots on the West Coast today.

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posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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No Fear Mongering here...just an observation.
(See?...no Fear!)


Just wanted to post this as I took the screen shot a few minutes ago and... DAMN!

Maybe not now or tomorrow or even in our life time but something has to give. So just a light discussion on it is fine. Thanks

quakes.globalincidentmap.com...





edit on 14-6-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Its possible; if i remember correctly didn't a large swarm of smaller EQ's like this hit Japan before the 9.1 went off?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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From that website:

Wednesday June 15 2011, 02:42:27 UTC 30 minutes ago Izu Islands, Japan region 4.5

Damn, the Japanese can't seem to get a break.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by TheUniverse
reply to post by jude11
 


Its possible; if i remember correctly didn't a large swarm of smaller EQ's like this hit Japan before the 9.1 went off?


Yeah, the same if I remember. Not saying that's what is happening here as the West coast usually gets a lot of action. Little more than usual these days it seems.

But this screen shot was a good one.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by Version100


From that website:

Wednesday June 15 2011, 02:42:27 UTC 30 minutes ago Izu Islands, Japan region 4.5

Damn, the Japanese can't seem to get a break.



You missed 5.2, 4.4 and 5.8 a few hours ago.


Yeah, they have it rough...still.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:18 PM
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They're only pretty little dots because you I presume live nowhere near them. Your attempts at irony aren't very amusing.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by OneLife
They're only pretty little dots because you I presume live nowhere near them. Your attempts at irony aren't very amusing.


No irony here. I lived there for a long time and will return actually. My family does live there.
Just when people post these images, they get slammed for fear mongering and I only wanted a light discussion.

Not meant to offend at all.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by Version100
 


That's pretty much normal. I lived there for 8 years and the ground always shakes. Their buildings are built to withstand A LOT. When it gets to 7, that's when it's time for a bit of panic. Even then, the only real source of danger is from Tsunamis and falling books.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by dadank
reply to post by Version100
 


That's pretty much normal. I lived there for 8 years and the ground always shakes. Their buildings are built to withstand A LOT. When it gets to 7, that's when it's time for a bit of panic. Even then, the only real source of danger is from Tsunamis and falling books.



I watch it every day myself and although it does get a lot of action, there seems to be a little swarm going on the whole West Coast for the last few 12 hrs or so.

Still makes me nervous tho.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Jude11, that is perfectly normal and in fact nowhere near how it often is. An earthquake over a 1.0 occurs once every 6 seconds. After a larger earthquake swarms of aftershocks happen. All normal. Those quakes define the Ring of Fire.

What is happening is that people who don't know this are suddenly inside an information overload called the Internet. Where before you only heard of the largest and most destructive, you can now click a link and see them all at once. It's understandable it could be alarming, but really nothing has changed or is new other than how we get this information.

Earthquakes along the edge of the Pacific Plate have been going on since long before Man came into existence. "The Big One" can happen at any time near Los Angeles, San Francisco, offshore from Eureka California or up near Seattle. It can also happen here where I live in Anchorage. It's no different than living in Tornado Alley or along the coasts often hit by Hurricanes, not to mention in a flood plain. If we all immersed ourselves in this we would all go mad and there is no place on the Earth safe from a natural disaster.

What I find most interesting are those who insist natural disasters are man made and can't happen on their own. They are in fact beyond our control. If everyone in Los Angeles knew and admitted to themselves they are going to have a killer quake at any second now, they would run but where too?
edit on 6/14/2011 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by jude11
 


Jude11, that is perfectly normal and in fact nowhere near how it often is. An earthquake over a 1.0 occurs once every 6 seconds. After a larger earthquake swarms of aftershocks happen. All normal. Those quakes define the Ring of Fire.

What is happening is that people who don't know this are suddenly inside an information overload called the Internet. Where before you only heard of the largest and most destructive, you can now click a link and see them all at once. It's understandable it could be alarming, but really nothing has changed or is new other than how we get this information.

Earthquakes along the edge of the Pacific Plate have been going on since long before Man came into existence. "The Big One" can happen at any time near Los Angeles, San Francisco, offshore from Eureka California or up near Seattle. It can also happen here where I live in Anchorage. It's no different than living in Tornado Alley or along the coasts often hit by Hurricanes, not to mention in a flood plain. If we all immersed ourselves in this we would all go mad and there is no place on the Earth safe from a natural disaster.

What I find most interesting are those who insist natural disasters are man made and can't happen on their own. They are in fact beyond our control. If everyone in Los Angeles knew and admitted to themselves they are going to have a killer quake at any second now, they would run but where too?
edit on 6/14/2011 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)


Good points Blaine91555 and yes it's true on the internet overload issue. When I first started watching quakes a few years ago, I was guilty of that and I imagine many others do the same.

I do find it interesting that Canada's West Coast is now showing minors now as that site usually only records 4.0 or higher. In fact I've seen little 2.0 actions show up in the middle of nowhere in Canada. In the last few weeks they have been recording from 1.2 and up. probably nothing but hey, gotta question things right?

As for the man-made vs natural point...YES...tired of it as a matter of fact. I will concede that some things don't make sense but it isn't all man-made. C'mon!

I thought that scr shot was a good one as the action is a little more today and I love discussing he West Coast EQ's. We may not see a big one in our life times but it's still fascinating to watch. And who knows, if we watch it close enough, we might get a little warning to help out others not seeing it.

Thanks for your input!



edit on 14-6-2011 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:46 PM
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I use to live in San Deigo, CA. From time to time someone would rush up to me and ask, "Did you just feel that?! We just had a small earthquake!". But I never felt even the slightest tremor. Once, my oldest brother came in my room asking me if I was in his closest. Uh....no. Duh! How would I have gotten back to my room without him seeing me exiting his closet and rushing past him to get to my room before him? I asked why and he said his closet doors were shaking really bad. He shrugged and said there must of been an earthquake. Again, I didn't feel a thing! But small eathquakes were always being reported whether I felt them or not.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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I have to agree with Blaine91555 about the normalcy of the number of earthquakes, at least in California. I've been keeping an eye on the USGS site since our 5.2M in 1996. That one was notable for us because far north California rarely experiences quakes that big---it was a Thanksgiving to remember.

But, the state is always busy with little quakes, and places like The Geysers and Mammoth Lake sees activity every day. You won't even feel them unless it is a 3.0M or larger, and even at that most of them would not be noticed unless you were far from traffic and noise. The only thing I see different is more activity in Nevada than I ever remember, and a few little bitty quakes around Mt. Shasta, who is a sleeping sister of Mt. St. Helens.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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Originally posted by Shawny2222
I use to live in San Deigo, CA. From time to time someone would rush up to me and ask, "Did you just feel that?! We just had a small earthquake!". But I never felt even the slightest tremor. Once, my oldest brother came in my room asking me if I was in his closest. Uh....no. Duh! How would I have gotten back to my room without him seeing me exiting his closet and rushing past him to get to my room before him? I asked why and he said his closet doors were shaking really bad. He shrugged and said there must of been an earthquake. Again, I didn't feel a thing! But small eathquakes were always being reported whether I felt them or not.
 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 




I've had conversations with people living there and I just can't imagine me being so calm if I lived there. Gets common place as usual I guess.

Lived in Taiwan for awhile and you sure do feel them there! Even the 4.0 will sway an entire building. Made me nauseous a few times.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by czygyny
I have to agree with Blaine91555 about the normalcy of the number of earthquakes, at least in California. I've been keeping an eye on the USGS site since our 5.2M in 1996. That one was notable for us because far north California rarely experiences quakes that big---it was a Thanksgiving to remember.

But, the state is always busy with little quakes, and places like The Geysers and Mammoth Lake sees activity every day. You won't even feel them unless it is a 3.0M or larger, and even at that most of them would not be noticed unless you were far from traffic and noise. The only thing I see different is more activity in Nevada than I ever remember, and a few little bitty quakes around Mt. Shasta, who is a sleeping sister of Mt. St. Helens.


Yeah, the Nevada ones are indeed not as normal. Wasn't there a theory of it being due to mining?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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Lots of small little ones are good, it means pressure is being released. When it goes quiet, then I'll worry.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by czygyny
I have to agree with Blaine91555 about the normalcy of the number of earthquakes, at least in California. I've been keeping an eye on the USGS site since our 5.2M in 1996. That one was notable for us because far north California rarely experiences quakes that big---it was a Thanksgiving to remember.

But, the state is always busy with little quakes, and places like The Geysers and Mammoth Lake sees activity every day. You won't even feel them unless it is a 3.0M or larger, and even at that most of them would not be noticed unless you were far from traffic and noise. The only thing I see different is more activity in Nevada than I ever remember, and a few little bitty quakes around Mt. Shasta, who is a sleeping sister of Mt. St. Helens.


Thanksgiving 1998. I remember it well.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by calstorm
Lots of small little ones are good, it means pressure is being released. When it goes quiet, then I'll worry.


Hit the nail on the head here. The plates are just sliding past each other and there's no reason to think a big one will happen in the next thousand years even. Could happen tomorrow or never.

Geologists have been looking and still are looking for signs that would detect the possibility of large earthquakes but are coming up empty handed. The plates are moving at about the rate a fingernail grows so as long as they keep up at that rate and don't suddenly stop I wouldn't worry to much.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I can't say if mining is causing the quakes or not in Nevada, but I live within miles of a world class cement quarry that mines the limestone seam that runs close by. An earthquake of around 1.0 or so frequently shows up on the USGS map due to the mining demo explosions happening around a mile deep, but the map usually notes that it is likely a quarry blast.

Nevada is full of small faults, and the land has been quiet for a long, long time. Times far past have shown a lot of volcanic and earthquake activity. Who knows what is in store?



edit on 6/14/2011 by czygyny because: accuracy in information



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by calstorm
 


Yes, you are correct, it was in 1998, but it was on Thanksgiving Day and the turkey was in the oven when the house began to shake like the devil had taken ahold of it. We had a few 3.0 and larger quakes that preceded it and it was on a fault heretofore not known in the area.

Another Redding-ite, I presume?



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