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Masonic Textbook

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posted on Jun, 17 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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freemasons monitor, available at your local library. go to the computer and search masonic.




posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by Fitzgibbon

Originally posted by The GUT
So my question: Is the Supreme Architect different than Jehovah?


The GAOTU has as many names as there are faiths. None of them is more correct than the other. In my Lodge, the Master is Sikh, our Senior Deacon is Mormon, a Past Master is Jewish, the brethren include Catholics, Protestants of all stripes, Muslim and other faiths. We all work together in harmony and nobody's faith is taken as being of lesser importance or correctness than anyone else's.

HTH
Fitz


Hi all. Just had to chime in with my feelings about the Masonic Great Architect Of The Universe. I don't think that he is the same as Jehovah. The God of the Bible Created everything from Nothing. For one thing an Architect doesn't create something from nothing. He draws a set a plans and helps create something from existing materials. So why do the Masons call their God an Architect? The God of the Bible created all things from nothing. So the God of Masonry (The Great Architect Of The Universe) is not the same as the God of the Bible.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by 480volt
 


it is nothing but metaphorical speaking. Well if you don't believe me I don't think a non-mason will know any better.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by fordrew
reply to post by 480volt
 


it is nothing but metaphorical speaking. Well if you don't believe me I don't think a non-mason will know any better.


Well, no offense but I don't believe you. Sorry! I think that the Masons gave their God that name because he isn't the God of the Bible.
To what other gods might Freemasonry's Great Architect Of The Universe be compared? In speaking of the name, "Great Architect Of The Universe," Albert Pike had this to say; "It is but an old term revived. Our adversaries numerous and formidable as they are, will say and will have a right to say that our Creative Principle is identical with the Generative Principle (god) of the Indian and Egyptian, and may fitly be symbolized as it was symbolized anciently. To accept this, in lieu of a personal God, is TO ABANDON CHRISTIANITY, and the worship of Jehovah, and return to wallow in the styles of Paganism." (Pike's quote from "Proceedings of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors-General of the Thirty-Third and Last Degree, etc., etc. Held at the city of New York, August 15, 1876," pp. 54, 55.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by 480volt
 


when a mason is being brought to light, there are some words said, I will share them with you.

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth, and the earth was without form an void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep, And God said, Let there be light, and there was light, I know in humble commemoration of the august and sublime scene, masonicly say, let there be light.

Does that sound like the same guy you are thinking of?

Just checking.

edit to add: please don't quote Pike, unless you are going to read the whole passage, and understand what he was saying. His words have been mangled by the uniformed for years. Don't be that guy.
edit on 20-6-2011 by network dude because: Augustusmasonicus has too much beer and won't share



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by 480volt
 


when a mason is being brought to light, there are some words said, I will share them with you.

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth, and the earth was without form an void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep, And God said, Let there be light, and there was light, I know in humble commemoration of the august and sublime scene, masonicly say, let there be light.

Does that sound like the same guy you are thinking of?

Just checking.

edit to add: please don't quote Pike, unless you are going to read the whole passage, and understand what he was saying. His words have been mangled by the uniformed for years. Don't be that guy.
edit on 20-6-2011 by network dude because: Augustusmasonicus has too much beer and won't share


Sorry but I will quote whom ever I like.

And, a Mason isn't brought to the true light until he proves himself worthy in the high degrees. Apparently you haven't been found worthy yet or..................

From the Masonic Textbook "Encyclopedia of Freemasonry: And its kindred sciences comprising the whole range of arts, sciences and literature as connected with the institution", by Albert G. Mackey, 33rd Degree. ISBN 1-56459-099-2. One of the most respected masonic authors of all time.

CIRCUMSPECTION. A necessary watchfulness is recommended to every man, but in a Mason it becomes a positive duty, and the neglect of it constitutes a HEINOUS CRIME. On this subject, the Old Charges of 1722 are explicit. "You shall be cautious in your words and carriage, that the most penetrating stranger shall not be able to discover or find out what is not proper to be imitated; and sometimes you shall DIVERT A DISCOUSE and manage it prudently for the honor of the Worshipful Fraternity."

divert

divert (dî-vûrt´, dì-) verb
diverted, diverting, diverts verb, transitive
1. To turn aside from a course or direction: Traffic was diverted around the scene of the accident.
2. To distract: My attention was diverted by an argument between motorists.
3. To entertain by distracting the attention from worrisome thoughts or cares; amuse. See synonyms at AMUSE.

verb, intransitive
To turn aside.
[Middle English diverten, from Old French divertir, from Latin dìvertere : dì-, dis-, aside. See DIS- + vertere, to turn.]
- divert´er noun
- divert´ingly adverb

discourse

discourse (dîs´kôrs´, -kors´) noun
1. Verbal expression in speech or writing.
2. Verbal exchange; conversation.
3. A formal, lengthy discussion of a subject, either written or spoken.
4. Archaic. The process or power of reasoning.

verb
discoursed, discoursing, discourses (dî-skôrs´, -skors´) verb, intransitive
1. To speak or write formally and at length. See synonyms at SPEAK.
2. To engage in conversation or discussion; converse.

verb, transitive
Archaic.
To narrate or discuss.
[Middle English discours, process of reasoning, from Medieval Latin discursus, from Latin, a running about, from past participle of discurrere, to run about : dis-, apart. See DIS- + currere, to run.]
- discours´er noun

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition copyright © 1992 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from InfoSoft International, Inc. All rights reserved.

So if you have read the meanings of the words above, you will know exactly what they are doing and why they are doing it. And you will see them practice it over and over. A few will try to rebut what there own masonic authors say but the majority will just practice Circumspection.

edit on 20-6-2011 by 480volt because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by 480volt
 


Ok. You are entitled to believe whatever you want to believe , but I don't over-analyze certain things such as that . I have HEARD that Albert Pike over-analyzed Freemasonry in his book, but then again I never read a single passage from the book, only quotes.
edit on 20-6-2011 by fordrew because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by fordrew
reply to post by 480volt
 


Ok. You are entitled to believe whatever you want to believe , but I don't over-analyze certain things such as that . I have HEARD that Albert Pike over-analyzed Freemasonry in his book, but then again I never read a single passage from the book, only quotes.
edit on 20-6-2011 by fordrew because: (no reason given)


Well Albert Pike is one of the most respected Masonic Authors of all time according to a ton of his own Masonic brothers and authors. (to many to list) That's how you find out things, by finding and reading what other people write. You can find electronic copies of some of his books on line. Download them and see for yourself. I have real copies of a bunch of his books among many other masonic authors and have some electronic versions of a few. I just got fascinated years ago with the whole Secret Society thing and have done a lot of Masonic research.



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by 480volt
 



No man truly obeys the Masonic law who merely tolerates those whose religious opinions are opposed to his own. Every man's opinions are his own private property, and the rights of all men to maintain each his own are perfectly equal. Merely to tolerate, to bear with an opposing opinion, is to assume it to be heretical; and assert the right to persecute, if we would; and claim our toleration of it as a merit. The Mason's creed goes further than that. No man, it holds, has any right in any way to interfere with the religious belief of another. It holds that each man is absolutely sovereign as to his own belief, and that belief is a matter absolutely foreign to all who do not entertain the same belief; and that, if there were any right of persecution at all, it would in all cases be a mutual right; because one party has the same right as the other to sit as judge in his own case; and God is she only magistrate that can rightfully decide between them. To that great Judge, Masonry refers the matter; and opening wide its portals, it invites to enter there and live in peace and harmony, the Protestant, the Catholic, the Jew. the Moslem; every man who will lead a truly virtuous and moral life, love his brethren, minister to the sick and distressed, and believe in the ONE, All-Powerful, All-Wise, everywhere-Present GOD, Architect, Creator, and Preserver of all things, by whose universal law of Harmony ever rolls on this universe, the great, vast, infinite circle of successive Death and Life:—to whose INEFFABLE NAME let all true Masons pay profoundest homage! for whose thousand blessings poured upon us, let us feel the sincerest gratitude, now, henceforth, and forever!
Morals & Dogma Chapter X, p167



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by 480volt
 


well, I apologize for thinking that I knew about masonry.

When you get a chance, would you let me know at what point I will learn all this other stuff?

When did they teach you this stuff? How did you learn it? Was it like the other 32 degrees?

Oh, I have so many questions! Let's start with these here, then we can move on.

Learning if fundamental!



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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All religious expression is symbolism; since we can describe only what we see; and the true objects of religion are unseen. The earliest instruments of education were symbols; and they and all other religious forms differed and still differ according to external circumstances and imagery, and according to differences of knowledge and mental cultivation. To present a visible symbol to the eye of another is not to inform him of the meaning which that symbol has to you. Hence the philosopher soon super-added to these symbols, explanations addressed to the ear, susceptible of more precision, but less effective, obvious, and impressive than the painted or sculptured forms which he despised. Out of these explanations grew by degrees a variety of narratives, whose true object and meaning were gradually forgotten. And when these were abandoned, and philosophy resorted to definitions and formulas, its language was but a more refined symbolism, grappling with and attempting to picture ideas impossible to be expressed. For the most abstract expression for Deity which language can supply, is but a sign or symbol for an object unknown, and no more truthful and adequate than the terms Osiris and Vishnu, except as being less sensuous and explicit. To say that He is a Spirit, is but to say that He is not matter. What spirit is, we can only define as the Ancients did, by resorting, as if in despair, to some sublimized species of matter, as Light, Fire, or Ether.

No symbol of Deity can be appropriate or durable except in a relative or moral sense. We cannot exalt words that have only a sensuous meaning, above sense. To call Him a Power or a Force, or an Intelligence, is merely to deceive ourselves into the belief that we use words that have a meaning to us, when they have none, or at least no more than the ancient visible symbols had. To call Him Sovereign, Father, Grand Architect of the Universe, Extension, Time, Beginning, Middle, and End, whose face is turned on all sides, the Source of life and death, is but to present other men with symbols by which we vainly endeavor to communicate to them 'the same vague ideas which men in all ages have impotently struggled to express. And it may be doubted whether we have succeeded either in communicating, or in forming in our own minds, any more distinct and definite and true and adequate idea of the Deity, with all our metaphysical conceits and logical subtleties, than the rude ancients did, who endeavored to symbolize and so to express His attributes, by the Fire, the Light, the Sun and Stars, the Lotus and the Scarabæus; all of them types of what, except by types, more or less sufficient, could not be expressed at all.
Morals & Dogma, Chapter XXV, pp 512-513



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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The laws of God are not obligatory on us because they are the enactments of His POWER, or the expression of His WILL; but because they express His infinite WISDOM. They are not right because they are His laws, but His laws because they are right. From the equilibrium of infinite wisdom and infinite force, results perfect harmony, in physics and in the moral universe. Wisdom, Power, and Harmony constitute one Masonic triad. They have other and profounder meanings, that may at some time be unveiled to you.

As to the ordinary and commonplace explanation, it may be added, that the wisdom of the Architect is displayed in combining, as only a skillful Architect can do, and as God has done everywhere,—for example, in the tree, the human frame, the egg, the cells of the honeycomb—strength, with grace, beauty, symmetry, proportion, lightness, ornamentation. That, too, is the perfection of the orator and poet—to combine force, strength, energy, with grace of style, musical cadences, the beauty of figures, the play and irradiation of imagination and fancy; and so, in a State, the warlike and industrial force of the people, and their Titanic strength, must be combined with the beauty of the arts, the sciences, and the intellect, if the State would scale the heights of excellence, and the people be really free. Harmony in this, as in all the Divine, the material, and the human, is the result of equilibrium, of the sympathy and opposite action of contraries; a single Wisdom above them holding the beam of the scales. To reconcile the moral law, human responsibility, free-will, with the absolute power of God; and the existence of evil with His absolute wisdom, and goodness, and mercy,—these are the great enigmas of the Sphynx.
Morals & Dogma, Chapter I, p 8
edit on 20-6-2011 by AlbertPike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by 480volt
Pike's quote from "Proceedings of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors-General of the Thirty-Third and Last Degree, etc., etc. Held at the city of New York, August 15, 1876," pp. 54, 55.
Do you have a link to a primary source? Or is this culled from anti-Masonic sites, quoting Blavatsky's Isis Unveiled? The one archive.org transcription I found that seemed to be of those Proceedings did not include your quote…



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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Originally posted by 480volt

Originally posted by fordrew
reply to post by 480volt
 


it is nothing but metaphorical speaking. Well if you don't believe me I don't think a non-mason will know any better.


Well, no offense but I don't believe you. Sorry! I think that the Masons gave their God that name because he isn't the God of the Bible.
To what other gods might Freemasonry's Great Architect Of The Universe be compared? In speaking of the name, "Great Architect Of The Universe," Albert Pike had this to say; "It is but an old term revived. Our adversaries numerous and formidable as they are, will say and will have a right to say that our Creative Principle is identical with the Generative Principle (god) of the Indian and Egyptian, and may fitly be symbolized as it was symbolized anciently. To accept this, in lieu of a personal God, is TO ABANDON CHRISTIANITY, and the worship of Jehovah, and return to wallow in the styles of Paganism." (Pike's quote from "Proceedings of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors-General of the Thirty-Third and Last Degree, etc., etc. Held at the city of New York, August 15, 1876," pp. 54, 55.



This quote is out of context and is incorrect, it is referring to the Congress of the Supreme Councils at Lausanne. The author that you cited replaced "Creative Principle" with TGAOTU, and left other parts out of the quote as well. This Congress is infamous in Masonic circles as it is the start of the schism between the United Grand Lodge of England and the Grand Orient of France. The quote from Blavatsky's Isis Unveiled Vol 2, pg 377 is as follows...




It is but recently that a majority of the Supreme Councils of the Ancient and Accepted Rite assembled at Lausanne, justly revolting against such a blasphemous belief as that in a personal Deity, invested with all human attributes, pronounced the following words: "Freemasonry proclaims, as it has proclaimed from its origin, the existence of a creative principle, under the name of the great Architect of the universe." Against this, a small minority has protested, urging that "belief in a creative principle is not the belief in God, which Freemasonry requires of every candidate before he can pass its very threshold."

This confession does not sound like the rejection of a personal God. Could we have had the slightest doubt upon the subject, it would be thoroughly dispelled by the words of General Albert Pike,** perhaps the greatest authority of the day, among American Masons, who raises himself most violently against this innovation. We cannot do better than quote his words:

"This Principe Createur is no new phrase — it is but an old term revived. Our adversaries, numerous and formidable, will say, and will have the right to say, that our Principe Createur is identical with the Principe Genateur of the Indians and Egyptians, and may fitly be symbolized as it was symbolized anciently, by the Lingae. . . . To accept this, in lieu of a personal God, is TO ABANDON CHRISTIANITY, and the worship of Jehovah, and return to wallow in the styes of Paganism."


Madame Blavatsky who was a Sister of what would be considered irregular Freemasonry, is actually objecting that the proposal is in fact eliminating the requirement of belief in a personal G-d by the Grand Orient of France (The authority of her own Obedience by the way).
edit on 20-6-2011 by no1smootha because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-6-2011 by no1smootha because: (no reason given)

edit on 21/6/2011 by Sauron because: changed internal quote to external quote



posted on Jun, 20 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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My apologies about the T&C violation. Sometimes these threads can put me in a bad mood, i try to avoid posting when i am in a bad mood but sometimes my fury gets the best of me...

Anyway,

Still waiting for you to post some excerpts from out of this "textbook" im curious as to what these moronic, sorry i mean masonic fools are getting their underwear in a tangle over.

A bunch of B.S.?

Everyone knows that the masons worship a conglomeration of vedic/egyptian religions. probably some pagan stuff in there too.

Either way, its knowledge that they stole from other people, thats why they are all going to be taken down soon.

I remember i had one of these "masonic textbooks" a friend gave it to me to read for laughs, he took it from his dad.. i read it and laughed my ass off. There was a page talking about meditation, saying to face the sunset and meditate, walk in circles or something of that nature. I laughed to myself as i tossed it in the garbage wondering why people subscribe to such nonsense...

I threw it in the trash, where it belonged.
edit on 20-6-2011 by BanMePlz because: added a few things

edit on 20-6-2011 by BanMePlz because: added apology

edit on 20-6-2011 by BanMePlz because: added a few things



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by BanMePlz
Still waiting for you to post some excerpts from out of this "textbook" im curious as to what these moronic, sorry i mean masonic fools are getting their underwear in a tangle over.

Well, I'm in the camp of "indifference" as I could care less if he does or does not. I'd rather him return the book to the local Lodge as that would be the right thing to do. Most ritual monitors have text in it that says at the death of the owner of the book it should be returned to the Lodge.


Originally posted by BanMePlz
Everyone knows that the masons worship a conglomeration of vedic/egyptian religions. probably some pagan stuff in there too.

We do? Since when? Man, I must have been asleep for the last several years as I have seen no Vedic or Egyptian religion. In fact, our rituals are very Biblical, if you actually knew anything about Freemasonry.


Originally posted by BanMePlz
Either way, its knowledge that they stole from other people, thats why they are all going to be taken down soon.

Stolen knowledge? Taken down? Are you saying that there is a conspiracy to destroy the Masons? And it will soon come to fruition? Hmmmm. Well, I say bring it on.


Originally posted by BanMePlz
I remember i had one of these "masonic textbooks" a friend gave it to me to read for laughs, he took it from his dad.. i read it and laughed my ass off. There was a page talking about meditation, saying to face the sunset and meditate, walk in circles or something of that nature. I laughed to myself as i tossed it in the garbage wondering why people subscribe to such nonsense...

Wow. You claim we stole stuff and yet you sit here and make a story that your friend STOLE his dad's books, and then you threw it away. Speaks really "highly" of your character. I doubt your story is even true as you have said nothing that pertains to Freemasonry. Move along troll.



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 08:08 AM
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Hi all. Just had to chime in with my feelings about the Masonic Great Architect Of The Universe. I don't think that he is the same as Jehovah.

That is correct god does not have a name.



The God of the Bible Created everything from Nothing. For one thing an Architect doesn't create something from nothing. He draws a set a plans and helps create something from existing materials. So why do the Masons call their God an Architect? The God of the Bible created all things from nothing. So the God of Masonry (The Great Architect Of The Universe) is not the same as the God of the Bible.

To my opinion god is more of an artist than an arhitect, a designer.

Don't think we can call the creator of the universe an arhitect, but more of a designer, an artist, a painter.
It is said that the universe is like a gentle artistic symphony waving into existance, an arhitect will base it's self on calculations, mathematics and is unable to design, it is unable to comprehend the beauty, or the curves. In other words it has no flexibility to do the artwork we see around us because it's not capabile of thinking of such things if it's based only on mathematics, rules and so on.

It is clear that the mathematician is no designer, it can't be, the question would be how are all the things design in such a beauty if god is an arhitect, imagination and creativity is oposed to mathematics and arhitects.
Imagination is anything you can concive with your mind without any rules at all. Create the art then blow that special life into it.

Arhitectual concepts, mathematics, comes from breaking down the art and looking at the pixels, I think math is an invention, just like math we can invent something else to explain the creation.
Laws of physics and the arhitectual concept is just one way of explaining the creation I think, and it does not define god as an arhitect, maybe we can find other means of explaining creation and invent something else just like math for example.

Math is just a way of explaining the art work. Something masons should understand that god is not a robot. Their so called arhitect is a robot, this sounds more like satan 666, that calculates everything, a freaking machine.



edit on 21-6-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by 480volt
Well, no offense but I don't believe you. Sorry! I think that the Masons gave their God that name because he isn't the God of the Bible.


We got the name from Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion, written about the same time as Anderson's Constitutions and a huge influence on Rev. Anderson, himself a Calvinist. The term originates not with Masonry but within Protestant theology.



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 


I hate to get into an English language discussion after having witnessed the wasted pages of debate on Latin etc., but have you ever looked into synonyms for the word "creator"?



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