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Total Lunar Eclipse

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posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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Just a reminder that 24 hours from this posting, there will be a lunar eclipse.
The shadow of the earth will fall on the moon.
There will be no doomsday, the world will not end, its just something cool to look at.

What time will it be?
Well it depends on where you are in the world. Here's some descriptions from the media...

For New Zealand
New Zealand will miss the last stages of eclipse because they occur after moonset.
Or in other words, it starts just before dawn but as the moon sets at dawn the eclipse will still be going.

For Australia
The eclipse begins at 3:25am AEST and enters its darkest phase, totality, at 5:22 am AEST. It will be possible to see the entire one hour and 41 minutes of totality from each capital city except Brisbane, where the moon sets while totally eclipsed.

For India
The lunar eclipse will be visible in India from 23:52 pm, June 15 to 3:32 am June 16. It is normally visible for almost 100 minutes but this year the duration will be more than ever before.

For the UAE
Marc Rouleau, Coordinator at The Planetarium of the Sharjah Higher Colleges of Technology, said the moon will start turning grey at 9:23pm when it will enter the penumbra (the early shadow of the Earth). The Earth's core shadow called umbra will start covering the moon exactly an hour later at 10:23pm. The shadow will completely cover the moon at 11:22pm. The eclipse will end at 1:03am UAE time after a whopping three hours and 40 minutes

For England
Wherever you live in the UK then the start of totality is not visible and it’s only from the extreme south-eastern parts of England where the Moon rises mere minutes ahead of the time of greatest eclipse at 9.13pm (BST). From the majority of England and Wales the second half of totality will be visible, provided observers have or can get access to a completely unobstructed south-eastern horizon. For Londoners, the moon rises fully in eclipse at 9.13pm and by the end of totality at 10.03pm it has only heaved itself almost five degrees above the horizon

For the USA
none of the eclipse will be visible from North America.




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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What none in north america? you kidding me? Thats a bunch of bs if you ask me. Whats up with that universe? Huh?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1


For the USA
none of the eclipse will be visible from North America.


Figures. It's not fair.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


And no for France raaaah...i always miss them.
Help, i need a plane !



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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For the USA none of the eclipse will be visible from North America.


We need to get to the bottom of this conspiracy, how can some of us see it and not others? Do we have two moons? total joke


Thanks for the info, wish it applied to me. I watched the last lunar eclipse a few months ago, guess I'll have to be happy with that.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by LaTouffe
And no for France raaaah...i always miss them.


The eclipse will be visible in Paris, Lyon, Toulouse, Nice and all other cities in France. The darkness should start to slowly descend at 7.22pm with the Moon totally covered in the Earth's shadow between 8.22 and 10.02pm.
RivieraTimes



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by reesie45
 


mega lulz, ymmd^^



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Hessdalen
 


Seriously, lol, its like the universe has it out for me lately.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:08 PM
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i hopefully will be able to watch this from totality and onwards at my rooftop.

thats if tomorrow happens to be a low day for persistent contrails


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by AnotherYOU
 


Well I think there was one in NA last week. I got a picture Here Last picture on the botttom



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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nasa stats for the vivibility:

eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov...

lots of german infos about teh visibility: www.mondfinsternis.net...



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by Hessdalen
 


Either way take some photos for those of us who cant see.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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This will prove all the moon-tards and sun-tards from the other forum wrong beyond any doubt: If the eclipse happens as calculated then this proves that moon and earth are still perfectly in their orbits, exactly where they belong.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by prof7
 


wrong! it will just prove tptb are using bluebeam to simulate the shadows on the moon.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by alfa1
 
Interesting. I never really considered a time difference in length of a lunar eclipse. If I'd considered it, I wouldn't have thought it would be a 2 hour difference!

Based on OP's informative post:
Australia: 1 hr, 41 min.
India: 3 hours, 40 min.
UAE: 3 hours, 40 min.

I know the moon is at a different angle across the sky based on where you live on Earth, which makes the moon visible for a longer or shorter period of time... but the shadow of the Earth passes more slowly??? Really? Call me stupid or whatever, but it just seems like the shadow is there or it isn't, and you see it or you don't. How can there be a 2 hour difference in the length of time it takes Earth's shadow to do this? We Earthlings are comparatively close together, watching something very far away (even if we are on a sphere.) A shadow moves. We watch it. It takes longer in some places than others. Time is truly relative. I need an astrophysicist, please. And a glass of wine.

S+F OP for hurting my brain.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 02:44 AM
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Haudi Folks

Im really excited about this. A few of us are making a big night of it, we are going about 200kms out of Perth away from the rain and clouds with 5 cameras and one telescope to shoot with different lenses. I will post my hopefully stunning results later on...

Happy days

themuse



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 03:07 AM
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Originally posted by themuse
Haudi Folks

Im really excited about this. A few of us are making a big night of it, we are going about 200kms out of Perth away from the rain and clouds with 5 cameras and one telescope to shoot with different lenses. I will post my hopefully stunning results later on...

Happy days

themuse
SWEET im looking forward to it. ill keep checking in.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by reesie45
 

We leave here in 3 hours and wont be back for about 12 hours. Then I have a feeling my feet might be frozen off and I may be sleepy - but i will post what i can asap. Please dont wait up its going to be a long night!!

themuse



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 03:10 AM
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reply to post by themuse
 


oh nvm i asked where u were located but i see now woops.

But i am looking forward to it.
edit on 15-6-2011 by reesie45 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 03:23 AM
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Originally posted by new_here
How can there be a 2 hour difference in the length of time it takes Earth's shadow to do this?


Its just a result of sloppy journalism really, and ill defined terms.
One set of quotes includes the time when the very first bit of the earths shadow touches the moon, the other (shorter) time refers to just the "total" part of the eclipse when the entirety of the moon is covered.
The time duration is the same for everyone on earth.




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