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'Major Result' on Sunspot Cycle to be Announced Tuesday

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posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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Would that cause something like a mini ice age? Sorry I'm pretty clueless how this all works....I'm trying to read about how the sun affects the earth but the more I read the more confused I get




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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Sorry- double post
edit on 14-6-2011 by WildWorld because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by WildWorld
 


Low solar activity (few sunspots) during the 'Little Ice Age' led to even colder conditions, especially colder winters in the N Hemisphere. It's possible therefore that we might well experience similar again. Maybe last winter will prove the norm?

However, other conditions are not the same and, notably, human activity has affected many climate processes. So really, we're in new territory.

Meanwhile, more on the announcement here:

Major drop in solar activity predicted



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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Now that we know what the left hand is doing, what is the right hand up too?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by Phage
 


Indeed...

Also means more cosmic particles will get through too, right?


It depends upon if during the "Maunder Minimum" the Earth was also experiencing large fluctuations in it's own magnetosphere.Indeed one may wonder if our own geomagnetic instabilities and the Sun's are not tied to a common cyclic causation such as the interstellar environment or another "outside influence" . Not a big Planet X/ Niribu kinda guy but I do recognize there are forces which do extend over vast distances that have nothing to do with such that may in fact influence our local environment in space.
seed



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:34 PM
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Here is something else i saw about this last year:

Since 1990, Matthew Penn and William Livingston, solar astronomers with the National Solar Observatory (NSO) in Tucson, Arizona, have been using a measurement known as Zeeman splitting to study the magnetic strength of sunspots. The Zeeman splitting is the distance between a pair of infrared spectral lines in a spectrograph taken of the light emitted by iron atoms in the atmosphere of the sun. The wider the distance, the greater is the intensity of the magnetic field.

Penn and Livingston examined 1500 sunspots and found that the average strength of the magnetic field of the sunspots has dropped from around 2700 gauss to 2000 gauss. (In comparison, the Earth’s magnetic field is below one gauss.) The reasons for the decline are unknown, but Livingston said that if the strength continues to decrease at the same rate it will drop to 1500 gauss by 2016, and below this strength the formation of sunspots appears to be impossible.
source


I thought this was really weird last year, but now they are being born out...



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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Penn and Livingston were right, apparently.

Global cooling, here we come.


edit on 14-6-2011 by HappyBunny because: Edited: Someone beat me to it!




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:55 PM
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At least the Global Warming alarmists wil be shut up.

It's a shame that CO2 doesn't drive climate, we could fix this by switching everyone from hybrids to Hummers.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Very interesting...brings up a lot of interesting information.

But still I feel a little lost. It seems a bit inconclusive...

Will there be any more info coming out?


edit on 14-6-2011 by Jugtalicus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
reply to post by WildWorld
 


Low solar activity (few sunspots) during the 'Little Ice Age' led to even colder conditions, especially colder winters in the N Hemisphere. It's possible therefore that we might well experience similar again. Maybe last winter will prove the norm?


Last winter is nothing compared to the 70's. When the 80's rolled around and the weather got warmer, we were glad because we didn't have to wear a hundred layers of clothes just to go outside.

I'm sure many people here remember the global cooling scare. It was going to be Death by Ice.

Funny how the same scaremongers then are the same scaremongers pushing global warming, isn't it?


However, other conditions are not the same and, notably, human activity has affected many climate processes. So really, we're in new territory.


No we're not. Earth's climate goes in cycles, simple as that. The temperature trend for the last 5,000 years (since the Climatic Optimum) has been downward.

Warm=good. Cold=bad. Historically, humans have been the most productive when the climate is mild. Farming didn't, as far as we know, get started until after the last Ice Age. It's hard to be creative and inventive when you're trying to not freeze to death.

edit on 14-6-2011 by HappyBunny because: Added on to last paragraph



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by AGWskeptic
At least the Global Warming alarmists wil be shut up.

It's a shame that CO2 doesn't drive climate, we could fix this by switching everyone from hybrids to Hummers.


Wanna bet they'll figure out a way to claim that we're so powerful we can even alter the way the sun behaves and that this is our fault?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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all i can say is ....



if the image does not fit..here is a direct link...

files.abovetopsecret.com...

and i'm confident that next cycle will do a lot of harm...there is still a missing piece in the puzzle which is yet to be found...it seems the less sunspots and activity..the greater the danger

Solar Maximum with Minimum Sun Spot Activity = 1859 Event?

so i hope authorities carry on with the solar storm protection policies..which i cant see a sign of yet..and i'm afraid we'll never see

edit on 14-6-2011 by heineken because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-6-2011 by heineken because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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And like i kinda expected it was more support for a long lasting grand minimum like maunder: www.space.com...

So this might be one of the last years we ever get to see sunspots like today in our lifetime.
And last time we had a event like maunder minimum we also slipped into a ice age and experienced significantly higher volcanic activity,



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:26 PM
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These "scientists" really don't know what's going to happen as a result of what they thought might happen, but won't...at least they're not sure.


The sun's new solar cycle, which is thought to have begun in December 2008, will be the weakest since 1928. That is the nearly unanimous prediction of a panel of international experts, some of whom maintain that the sun will be more active than normal.

www.newscientist.com...

Analysis by scientist of detailed sunlight readings taken from 2004 to 2007 by NASA's (SORCE) satellite found that:


...although the Sun was putting out less energy overall than usual, in line with observations showing decreased sunspot activity, it actually emitted more in the key visible-light and near-infrared wavelengths.

www.theregister.co.uk...

Hence, we saw additional warming of the Earth due to the increase in energy from the Sun reaching us in visible wavelengths.

So...a decrease in sun spots sometimes makes for an increase in global temperatures. Yet we are now being told that a decrease in sun spots, likely signaling a solar minimum some have compared to The Maunder Minimum, might actually result in a decrease in global temperatures.

To me what they're saying sounds something akin to the daily meteorological prognostications we are bombarded with, that are either right or they're wrong and hey, sometimes the weather changes right?! They simply don't know! What's more is that so many people make a big deal of these predictions (educated guesses) and try to fool us into believing in consequences of something that may or may not exist.

I think the scientists would be much better off, and suffer less criticism and harm to their reputations, if they simply made their solar observations and left the guessing to the weather folks. At least when the weather guy gets it wrong, the world won't unexpectedly come to an end.

ESV



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Link: Sun's Fading Spots Signal Big Drop in Solar Activity

Some unusual solar readings, including fading sunspots and weakening magnetic activity near the poles, could be indications that our sun is preparing to be less active in the coming years.

The results of three separate studies seem to show that even as the current sunspot cycle swells toward the solar maximum, the sun could be heading into a more-dormant period, with activity during the next 11-year sunspot cycle greatly reduced or even eliminated.

The results of the new studies were announced today (June 14) at the annual meeting of the solar physics division of the American Astronomical Society, which is being held this week at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

So... Even though mankind contributed to some level, could a highly active sun have been the cause of our current global warming issues?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by Section31
Link: Sun's Fading Spots Signal Big Drop in Solar Activity

Some unusual solar readings, including fading sunspots and weakening magnetic activity near the poles, could be indications that our sun is preparing to be less active in the coming years.

The results of three separate studies seem to show that even as the current sunspot cycle swells toward the solar maximum, the sun could be heading into a more-dormant period, with activity during the next 11-year sunspot cycle greatly reduced or even eliminated.

The results of the new studies were announced today (June 14) at the annual meeting of the solar physics division of the American Astronomical Society, which is being held this week at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

So... Even though mankind contributed to some level, could a highly active sun have been the cause of our current global warming issues?

I think it definitely could. The sun has not only been active over last decades, but it has been the most active that it has been since over 8000 years ago. It was not this active since beginning of this interglacial and yet even though it has warmed up some it is still nowhere near previous warm periods.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 


If I add one drop to the ocean I "contributed" to ocean levels rising.

As it turns out thats about how much effect we have on global climate.

I have a problem with any theory that ignores the laws of thermodynamics. But where it gets bad is when any scientist declares the debate as settled, or when they smear differing views, or when they bully periodicals to keep out contrarian views, or when they purposly hide data.

Science, like government, is best when it's out in the open.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by Essan
 

While the "little ice age" occurred during the Maunder Minimum, there are indications that it began significantly (400 years) before.


It's not really known what effect, if any, the solar cycle has on long term climate. While correlations have been found with ENSO events and the cycle, the total change in solar irradiance between solar maximum and solar minimum has been observed at only 0.1%. While, in the long term such a change may have climate effects, internal events such as volcanism would have a much stronger influence.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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So yeah I'm confused. So there will be no increase in solar storms with a peak in 2013?



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