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A Look at Space: Part 3: Nebulae

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posted on Aug, 13 2004 @ 01:59 AM
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Many nebulae are given the names of insects and other animals! Check a couple of these out here:

Wings of a Butterfly Nebula : M2-9 : A Planetary Nebula
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Description & Source: antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...
"M2-9, a butterfly planetary nebula 2100 light-years away shown in representative colors, has wings that tell a strange but incomplete tale. In the center, two stars orbit inside a gaseous disk 10 times the orbit of Pluto. The expelled envelope of the dying star breaks out from the disk creating the bipolar appearance. Much remains unknown about the physical processes that cause planetary nebulae."
Description: hubblesite.org...
"M2-9 is a striking example of a "butterfly" or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the "Twin Jet Nebula." If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. Ground-based studies have shown that the nebula's size increases with time, suggesting that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1,200 years ago."

A Bright Bug Nebula : NGC 6302 : A Planetary Nebula
external image
Description & Source: antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...
"With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the central star of this particular planetary nebula is exceptionally hot though -- shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. Above is a dramatically detailed close-up of the dying star's nebula recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is in the upper left corner of this view, nearly edge-on to the line-of-sight. Surprisingly, minerals including water ice, along with complex hydrocarbon molecules have been detected in this hot star's dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation Scorpius.
More on this nebula: www.spaceref.com...




posted on Sep, 17 2004 @ 01:50 AM
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sorry for so small picture of NGC 7380.




posted on Sep, 20 2004 @ 03:33 PM
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Cat's eye


ref:
hubblesite.org...



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