I have a QUESTION! Lol, about Blood Types..

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posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 02:51 AM
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Can anyone help me??

I'm trying to find out about Neanderthal vs Cro-Magnon blood types.

as most of us ATSers may already know all primate blood is Rh+, except humans.

apparently blood types don't mutate, thus humans must have extra-terrestrial DNA hence why at least 15% of humans are Rh- (it's a recessively expressed gene, hence the actual presence of Rh- blood cells in our population is closer to a whooping 58%).

so primates are Rh+
humans are Rh-

what factor were Neanderthals?
and what factor were CroMagnons??




posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 03:16 AM
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www.aoi.com.au...

check that out, may answer your question.



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 04:01 AM
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Originally posted by kaleshchand
www.aoi.com.au...

check that out, may answer your question.


You've got to be kidding me......I swear I was just getting ready to post that exact same page!!!!


Well I guess great minds think alike and all that!



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 04:28 AM
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Originally posted by Enkii
Can anyone help me??

I'm trying to find out about Neanderthal vs Cro-Magnon blood types.

as most of us ATSers may already know all primate blood is Rh+, except humans.

apparently blood types don't mutate, thus humans must have extra-terrestrial DNA hence why at least 15% of humans are Rh- (it's a recessively expressed gene, hence the actual presence of Rh- blood cells in our population is closer to a whooping 58%).

so primates are Rh+
humans are Rh-


It is not that primates (and other mammals) are not Rh-, it is that they are nolonger Rh-. Which means that because viruses are the primary selective factor in mammalian evolution, and that Rh negative blood types have a weaker immune response to viruses, that due to a lack of medicine, that particular characteristic has been successfully bred out of all mammals, except us.



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 06:06 AM
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Originally posted by Enkii
Can anyone help me??

I'm trying to find out about Neanderthal vs Cro-Magnon blood types.

as most of us ATSers may already know all primate blood is Rh+, except humans.

Might be a good idea to provide a source for this bit of information.



apparently blood types don't mutate, thus humans must have extra-terrestrial DNA hence why at least 15% of humans are Rh- (it's a recessively expressed gene, hence the actual presence of Rh- blood cells in our population is closer to a whooping 58%).

Now you need to provide source for at least this "blood types don't mutate" claim, as they clearly do mutate, and thus we don't need to have extra-terrestrial DNA.



so primates are Rh+
humans are Rh-

And this is wrong too. I'm not sure about all other primates, but only some humans (far less than 50%) don't have any Rh antigen on the surface of their red blood cells.



what factor were Neanderthals?
and what factor were CroMagnons??


Does it really matter whether they had or didn't have some antigen factor on the surface of their red blood cells? All Rhesus monkeys have it. Maybe all primates apart from some humans have it. What does it matter?

Oh and I'm A-


Oh and looking at distribution of Rh neg blood. It looks to me, like it's a European feature and the tiny fraction you see in other populations is likely due to gene transfer from European populations into them. Thus, it looks like this feature developed in ancestral European populations only relatively recently, and thus Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon were likely Rh pos, unless there was parallel evolution which I find unlikely in this case as Rh neg type does not increase chances of survival in any way.
edit on 12-6-2011 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2012 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by Pythein

Originally posted by Enkii
Can anyone help me??

I'm trying to find out about Neanderthal vs Cro-Magnon blood types.

as most of us ATSers may already know all primate blood is Rh+, except humans.

apparently blood types don't mutate, thus humans must have extra-terrestrial DNA hence why at least 15% of humans are Rh- (it's a recessively expressed gene, hence the actual presence of Rh- blood cells in our population is closer to a whooping 58%).

so primates are Rh+
humans are Rh-


It is not that primates (and other mammals) are not Rh-, it is that they are nolonger Rh-. Which means that because viruses are the primary selective factor in mammalian evolution, and that Rh negative blood types have a weaker immune response to viruses, that due to a lack of medicine, that particular characteristic has been successfully bred out of all mammals, except us.


they were never rh- because its a RECENT phenom



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by rhinoceros

Oh and I'm A-


Oh and looking at distribution of Rh neg blood. It looks to me, like it's a European feature and the tiny fraction you see in other populations is likely due to gene transfer from European populations into them. Thus, it looks like this feature developed in ancestral European populations only relatively recently, and thus Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon were likely Rh pos, unless there was parallel evolution which I find unlikely in this case as Rh neg type does not increase chances of survival in any way.
edit on 12-6-2011 by rhinoceros because: (no reason given)


Hi Rhino,

If I remember right, Neanderthals were Rh-, not Rh+. Not only that, but O- is the universal donor.

www.newscientist.com...

Maybe the Europeans, especially in the Basque country where Rh- concentration is very, very high, got their Rh- from the Neanderthals.

Hey, it could have happened.

edit on 7/9/2012 by HappyBunny because: (no reason given)
edit on 7/9/2012 by HappyBunny because: (no reason given)





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